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Doctor insights on: Apheresis

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Dr. Michael Gabor
14 doctors shared insights

Apheresis (Overview)

Apheresis is is a medical technology in which the blood of a donor or patient is passed through an apparatus that separates out one particular constituent and returns the remainder to the circulation.


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How does platelet donation work via apheresis?

How does platelet donation work via apheresis?

Pheresis: Is essence is a process where blood is "filtered" to extract either cellular products, red cells, white cells or a substance for either re-infusion (cell) or removal a macroglobulin in plasmapheresis in waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. ...Read more

Dr. Michael Gabor
14 doctors shared insights

Apheresis (Overview)

Apheresis is is a medical technology in which the blood of a donor or patient is passed through an apparatus that separates out one particular constituent and returns the remainder to the circulation.


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What does apheresis mean?

What does apheresis mean?

Pheresis: Is essence is a process where blood is "filtered" to extract either cellular products, red cells, white cells or a substance for either re-infusion (cell) or removal a macroglobulin in plasmapheresis in waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. ...Read more

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Who can donate platelets via apheresis?

Who can donate platelets via apheresis?

Platelet Donation: A platelet donor using apheresis must meet requirements for a regular blood donor and: 1) be at least 16 years old 2) be in good health 3) weigh at least 110 pounds 4) have a good vein 5) refrain from taking aspirin, or products containing Aspirin or feldene, (piroxicam) for 48 hours prior to donating. Always check with your local blood donation center first before going to donate. ...Read more

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What should I doing, to prepare my body for an apheresis donation on monday ?

What should I doing, to prepare my body for an apheresis donation  on monday ?

Kindly check out: This link. God bless you for your noble deed! http://m.Redcrossblood.Org/donating-blood/types-donations/platelet-donation. ...Read more

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Kidney transplant needed. Confused about plasma exchange?

Kidney transplant needed. Confused about plasma exchange?

Removes antibodies: Plasma exchange or plasmapheresis is designed to remove antibodies (proteins) from the plasma fraction of the blood, which is then replaced with other plasma or albumin. It is done when the recipient has antibodies targeting the hla antigens in the donor. It may be done before or after the transplant; and is useful to prevent or treat rejections. ...Read more

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Do plasma donation banks make mistakes with blood?

Do plasma donation banks make mistakes with blood?

Of course...: Everything human will have mistakes. So, the answer to the question, "Do people make mistakes?", is always yes. The real question is, "How likely would a mistake be in this particular situation?" Fortunately, blood banks rarely make mistakes, because they use multiple safeguards, and they know a mistake can be fatal. ...Read more

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What is plasma osmolarity? Plasma osmolality?

What is plasma osmolarity? Plasma osmolality?

Conc. electrolytes.: These refer to the concentration of electrolytes in the body/plasma, or the electrolyte-water balance. These measure the same thing, only that osmolality is the number of osmoles per kilogram of solvent or osm/kg, while osmolarity is the number of osmoles per liter of solution or osm/ltr. Osmolality excludes the solute, while osmolarity includes it, so osmolality has a slightly higher reading. ...Read more

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Apheresis plasma return failure and swelling during double red blood cell donation procedure, what does this mean?

Apheresis plasma return failure and swelling during double red blood cell donation procedure, what does this mean?

Vein perforation: The message is just the machine reporting it could not return the plasma (=failure). The swelling most likely means the needle unknowingly punctured the back wall of the vein--so drawing was OK, but return allowed it to leak out and make a bruise (that might be light in color since the RBCs were removed). Local warm compresses should help resolve it quicker. ...Read more

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Peripheral t-cell lymphoma cure: chop induction+ifosfamide/mtx + autologous transplant or romidepsim+brenduximab?

Peripheral t-cell lymphoma cure: chop induction+ifosfamide/mtx + autologous transplant or romidepsim+brenduximab?

Complex problem: Cannot comment with 2 lines of information. Need the entire clinical context. If you seek more detailed information get a formal second opinion. ...Read more

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Life expectancy of myeloma patients after autologous stem cell transplant?

Life expectancy of myeloma patients after autologous stem cell transplant?

Myeloma : There are many things that go into predicting life expectancy of somebody with myeloma who has an autologous stem cell transplant. The rough estimate for somebody getting a transplant in first remission is about 6-7 years now. However, this is something your oncologist or transplant doctor can talk to you about with more specific information. ...Read more

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Stem cell apheresis for bone marrow transplant? How does this work and is it safe? I thought bone marrow stem cells were inside your bones, so how can you collect them from your blood? Also, can your body make more bone marrow without the stem cells?

Stem cell apheresis for bone marrow transplant? How does this work and is it safe? I thought bone marrow stem cells were inside your bones, so how can you collect them from your blood?  Also, can your body make more bone marrow without the stem cells?

Most : Most bone marrow stem cells are inside you bones, some are floating around. When given a medication/natural substance called gcsf or Neupogen more stem cells are found in the peripheral blood. These can be removed by a machine that filters your blood. An IV is placed in two places, your blood is removed, filtered and returned. You are left with stem cells so you too continue to make blood. ...Read more

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How is plasmapheresis performed?

Using a machine: A cell separator is used. Access to a vein is needed, using either needles or a catheter. Blood is drawn from the person, and goes into a centrifuge which separates the liquid part of blood (the plasma) from the cellular parts. The plasma is collected and replaced with some other liquid as the blood is returned. It can be done either for treatment of disease, or to collect blood components. ...Read more

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How to go about donating platelets by apheresis?

How to go about donating platelets by apheresis?

Platelet Donation: A platelet donor using apheresis must meet requirements for a regular blood donor and: 1) be at least 16 years old 2) be in good health 3) weigh at least 110 pounds 4) have a good vein 5) refrain from taking aspirin, or products containing Aspirin or feldene, (piroxicam) for 48 hours prior to donating. Always check with your local blood donation center first before going to donate. ...Read more

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Pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplantation: what does this mean?

Pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplantation: what does this mean?

Saving insulin: When an islet cell transplant has to be performed it means that the pancreatectomy was total. The pancreas is an exocrine (digestive juice) and endocrine gland from the Islets of Langerhans. When all are removed, islet transplant helps retain endocrine activity including insulin production. ...Read more

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Whats plasma exchange?

Whats plasma exchange?

Plasma exchange: Plasma exchange is when, using a special machine much like a dialysis machine, whole blood is taken from a vein in your arm and spun in a centrifuge so that the plasma floats to the top to be removed, and the leftover blood is returned to your body. It is used to treat a condition known as ttp. Plasmapheresis is when plasma is removed, but Albumin is given back. ...Read more

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Is packed cell blood transfusion help for thalassemia patient?

Is packed cell blood transfusion help for thalassemia patient?

Thalasemia: If indicated -i.e. Significant symptomatic anemia - blood transfusion is given to patient with thalassemia major. Iron cheating agents should be considered if one receives multiple blood transfusion . Pls discuss further in detail with your pediatric hematologist. ...Read more

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Risks of kidney transplant and plasma exchange?

Not very harmful: If someone spoke to you about plasma exchange, then the issue is the presence of anti-donor antibodies in the recipient. The procedure removes the plasma containing the antibodies. The procedure is used either at the time (or just before) the transplant to prevent rejection in sensitized patients. Or, after the transplant if antibody mediated rejection has occurred. ...Read more

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Why don't stroke patients get tpa (alteplase) therapy?

Why don't stroke patients get tpa (alteplase) therapy?

They can: If having a stroke one can receive intravenous tpa (alteplase) up to 3 hours once symptoms begin and up to 4.5 hours in certain cases. After this intra. ...Read more

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In what way can plasma donation sites pay donors?

In what way can plasma donation sites pay donors?

Not recommended: Red Cross and many facilities in US will not accept products from pay-for-donate locations. This is due to the concern that a potential donor might not be totally honest in the history questions if seeking $$ and this could contaminate the blood supply. Volunteer donors have no motivation to not provide direct answers. ...Read more