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Doctor insights on: Aortic Valve Tissue Vs Mechanical

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Aortic valve replacement - tissue or mechanical better?

Aortic valve replacement - tissue or mechanical better?

AVR: Aortic valves can be replaced with either mechanical valves or bio prosthetic, taken from animals and treated to prevent rejection. There are different reasons for choosing either valve such as age and treatment with anticoagulants. Individuals who do not wish to be on meds such as Coumadin (warfarin) may have a bioprosthetic valve, however, younger individuals usually have mechanical valves. ...Read more

Dr. Theodore Davantzis
1 doctor shared a insight

Valve (Definition)

A valve is a structure that regulates the direction of flow. The heart is a special kind of pump. It moves blood by squeezing and relaxing. There are 4 chambers and each chamber has a valve. This keeps blood from moving backwards when the heart squeezes. When a chamber squeezes it lets the blood move forward but when the chamber is relaxed it prevents the blood from ...Read more


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Aortic valve replacement - tissue or mechanical which would you suggest?

Aortic valve replacement - tissue or mechanical which would you suggest?

Depends: Age bleeding risks ulcers, diverticulitis etc travel compliance with medicines we offer all choices and tailor to the specific patient scenario. The mechanical valve patients are treated for life with anticoagulants. ...Read more

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What's the life span of a mechanical Aortic valve ?

What's the life span of a mechanical Aortic valve ?

May be decades: mechanical valves are the most durable of all heart valves. The "biological valves" or "tissue valves" usually last a decade or so but have the advantage or lower risk of clotting and less need for anticoagulation. Patients with mechanical valves general should be anticoagulated with Coumadin (warfarin). People who have a long life span and have low risk with anticoagulation are best for mechanical valves ...Read more

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Why will my tissue aortic valve replacement only last for 7-12 years, especially because my original lasted 65 years?

Why will my tissue aortic valve replacement only last for 7-12 years, especially because my original lasted 65 years?

Foreign material: A tissue (pig or cow) or "bioprosthetic"(synthesized from natural tissue such as pericardium) generally lasts 7-12 years(with some variability) because, unlike your native valve, is foreign to the body. It is susceptible to certain stresses that your own valve wasn't. They are safe, however, and improve the quality of life during those years. ...Read more

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How common is a mechanical aortic valve replacement surgery?

How common is a mechanical aortic valve replacement surgery?

Very: Choices are repair fr some mitral valves. Biologic or mechanical for aortic valves depending on age, bleeding issues, and overall risk assessment. ...Read more

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How much time should one take warfarin after aortic valve replacement tissue valve?

How much time should one take warfarin after aortic valve replacement tissue valve?

Check with your doc: If you have your aortic valve replaced with a tissue valve, some surgeons do not recommend warfarin at all, others may suggest you take a blood thinner for a short while e.g. 1-3 months. If you have any other problems such as an irregular heart beat like atrial fibrillation, you may have other reasons that you would need warfarin. It would be best to check with your doctor. ...Read more

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What is best method for replacing aortic valve damaged due to rheumatic heart disease for 51 year old man?mechanical biological or auto or homograft?

What is best method for replacing aortic valve damaged due to rheumatic heart disease for 51 year old man?mechanical biological or auto or homograft?

Longevity: Repair is the best option but may not be feasible. The tissue valve options are attractive because of minimal anti coagulation but at 51 you would have to plan on at least one reoperation in the future. Mechanical should last a lifetime but will require anti coagulation that may inhibit some of your activities. Discuss in depth with surgeon and cardiologist. ...Read more

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Artificial vs tissue aortic valve replacement. Is it worth it to do tissue when it will have to be redone in 10 to 12 years? Effects of blood thinner?

Artificial vs tissue aortic valve replacement. Is it worth it to do tissue when it will have to be redone in 10 to 12 years? Effects of blood thinner?

Depends.....: Depends on age, lifestyle and need or not for anticoagulant for other reasons. Coumadin (warfarin) is not without risk, while the risk for re-replacement of a tissue aortic valve is not high. So if you are relatively young (<60), don't need Coumadin (warfarin) or don't want to take it, it would be very reasonable to have a tissue valve with the understanding that you will probably require another replacement. ...Read more

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My husband had open heart surgery at 57 for a mitrial valve repair. At 66 he needs his aortic valve replaced He is in excellent health. Can he have a third operation when that tissue valve wears out?

My husband had open heart surgery at 57 for a mitrial valve repair. At 66 he needs his aortic valve replaced He is in excellent health. Can he have a third operation when that tissue valve wears out?

Sure: The suggestion would be to cross the bridge when you get there. Since he's in good health he probably won't need any more surgeries... There are other minimally invasive valve procedures being developed... So when the time comes for third - he may be a candidate for that. ...Read more

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Had mechanical aortic valve replacement on 2001. Been on warfarin ever since want to get a tattoo on the inside of my forearm. Is this save?

Had mechanical aortic valve replacement on 2001. Been on warfarin ever since want to get a tattoo on the inside of my forearm. Is this save?

Not really: You may not bleed much, but i worry about technique and infection and valve infection is a disaster. You are a lucky beneficiary of american ingenuity and medical care! why take a elective risk? ...Read more

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What is an aortic valve?

What is an aortic valve?

See Below: The aortic valve lies between the left ventricle and the aorta. The left ventricle contracts and sends oxygenated blood to the body, it then relaxes and the aortic valve closes to prevent the blood from returning to the heart. ...Read more

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Where is the aortic valve?

Where is the aortic valve?

Between LV and Ao: The aortic valve is a passive flap valve with three leaflets which opens as the left ventricle (LV) ejects blood into the Aorta (Ao). After ejection, the LV relaxes, and when LV pressure is lower than Ao pressure, the aortic valve flaps closed, preventing blood from leaking (regurgitating) back into the heart. ...Read more

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What is in the aortic valve?

What is in the aortic valve?

Left side: The aortic valve is the outflow valve and it is located on the left side of the heart. It opens to allow blood to leave the left ventricle and it closes to prevent backflow of blood into the ventricle. ...Read more

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What is aortic valve disease?

Aortic Valve: The aortic valve functions as a valve -no surprise here-. So it can either leak or be restricted (stenotic). Both conditions, when severe, need to be corrected. This is usual done by replacing the defective valve with an artificial one. There are many conditions/diseases that can cause the valve to leak or be restricted. ...Read more

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What is an aortic valve disorder?

What is an aortic valve disorder?

Abnormal valve: The aortic valve is the valve leading out of the heart to the aorta. It may be thickened or calcified. It may then become narrowed. It may also leak. It may become infected, causing damage. ...Read more

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Where is the aortic valve located?

Where is the aortic valve located?

Aortic Valve: The aortic valve is an integral part of the heart and is located between the left ventricle and the aorta. It opens when the left ventricle contracts (systole) and allows blood to be pumped into the aorta. It closes when the left ventricle fills (diastole). ...Read more

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What is the size of the aortic valve?

1.5-2: 1.5 - 2 CM squared is a normal aortic valve area, though body size must be taken into account. ...Read more

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What is the function of aortic valve?

Aortic Valve: The aortic valve is an integral part of the heart and is located between the left ventricle and the aorta. It opens when the left ventricle contracts (systole) and allows blood to be pumped into the aorta. It closes when the left ventricle fills (diastole). It's function is to prevent blood from flowing back from the aorta while the heart is filling. ...Read more

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What is another name for aortic valve?

Semi-lunar: It is one of 2 semi-lunar valves (the other is the pulmonic valve) but the aortic valve per se has no other unique name (in english). ...Read more

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What is the purpose of an aortic valve?

What is the purpose of an aortic valve?

Help: When the heart contracts it squirts blood into the aorta; the aortic valve keeps the blood from flowing back into the heart (left ventricle). ...Read more

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Dr. Jeffrey Wint
3 doctors shared insights

Aortic Valve (Definition)

The aortic valve is one of 4 valves in the heart, each of which separates 2 cardiac chambers. It opens when blood is actively ejected from the left ventricle into the aorta artery, to be carried to the rest of the body. It then closes firmly to prevent blood from flowing backwards, while it passively continues to flow forward to body's vital organs. When next heartbeat ...Read more


Tissue (Definition)

The body is composed of tissue that are classically described as beiing derived from three basic embyonic layers known as the endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm that then differentiate into the structures that compose the body such as skin, soft tissues, bone, muscle, organs, etc. Stem cells are not differentiated and have the potential to ...Read more