Top
30
Doctor insights on: Antiarrhythmic Medication

Share
1

1
What are the classes of antiarrhythmic medications?

What are the classes of antiarrhythmic medications?

I, II, III and IV: Class I is divided into ia, ib, and ic. These are sodium channel blockers. An example from this class would be propafenone. Class ii agents are beta-blockers (like metoprolol). Class iii are potassium channel blockers - for example, amiodarone. Class IV are calcium channel blockers, like diltiazem. ...Read more

Antiarrhythmic (Definition)

Antiarrythmics treat or prevent the heart from going out ...Read more


2

2
Can you tell me about classes I and II antiarrhythmic medications (and digoxin)?

Can you tell me about classes I and II antiarrhythmic medications (and digoxin)?

Vaughan-Williams: What you are referring to, I believe, is what is called the vaughan-williams classification (circa 1970) of anti arrhythmic drugs. Class I drugs block sodium channels on the cells, class ii drugs block beta-receptors, class iii drugs block potassium channels, and class IV drugs block calcium channels. Digoxin does not fit the vaughn-williams classification, as its properties are different still. ...Read more

3

3
Would you take an antiarrhythmic drug to maintain normal sinus rhythm?

Maybe: It depends. It won't prolong life or prevent strokes, but it may improve the quality of life if atrial fibrillation is significantly bothersome. Cather ablation is another option if drugs don't work or have significant side effects. ...Read more

4

4
How do class 1b antiarrhythmic drugs help in treating ventricular fibrillation?

How do class 1b antiarrhythmic drugs help in treating ventricular fibrillation?

Sodium Channels: Sodium channels are responsible for the action potential, the depolarization of the heart. These drugs decrease the excitability of the heart because they interfere with the sodium channels. So it will help against ventricular fibrillation. ...Read more

6

6
I taken flecainide. Before CABG, flecainide changed to amiodarone for a week. After CABG, may directly converted amiodron to other antiarrhythmic drug?

Antiarrythmic drug: What is your question? Is it may amiodarone could be converted to other antiarrythmic?
If clinical condition warrants a change, yes it could be changed to whatever the best for that situation. ...Read more

7

7
Which anti-arrhythmic medication is best to control frequent, non-sustained, monomorphic ventricular arrhythmias with a structurally NORMAL heart?

May need nothing: Unless causing symptoms or a cardiologist finds some. Underlying abnormality what you describe does not need treatment. Caffeine, lack of sleep, stress, alcohol and decongestants like pseudofed, and energy drinks will all exacerbate the problem. If it needs treatment a beta blocker like Metoprolol or Coreg (carvedilol) are good choices Too much thyroid medication can bring this out as well. ...Read more

9

9
What class of anti-arrhythmic is the drug procainamide?

Class 1A: Procainamide is a Class 1A Antiarrythmic. It is used in patients with certain arrhythmia problems and is part of the ACLS/PALS protocols. ...Read more

10

10
Can AF (without an anti-arrhythmic drug) lead to VF. Does effective rate control prevent VF?

Unlikely: Atrial fibrillation does not usually lead to VF unless the person also has WPW syndrome. If one has not been diagnosed with WPW, the chances of atrial fibrillation going into ventricular fibrillation is very low. Of course, if one has a fast heart rate for a long time, one can develop CHF and then possibly VF, but not because of the AF. Rate control prevents CHF or retards its development. ...Read more

11

11
I'm interested in starting Plexis Slim. However, I do take an anti arrhythmic drug:multaq. Will Plexis slim interact with Multaq?

Yes -- don't use it: It has been associated with cardiac arrhythmias, for which you're being treated. It may also result in kidney damage.
Stay away from all such "snake oil" agents.
They're hyped as "all natural", as if that means 100% safety. Arsenic, lead, and poisonous mushrooms are also all natural.
Anyone trying to sell you something has a conflict of interest. ...Read more

12

12
How do antiarrythmic drugs help in the treatment of ventricular fibrillation?

How do antiarrythmic drugs help in the treatment of ventricular fibrillation?

Channel Poisons.: All antiarrhythmic medications are targeted at the channels that allow sodium, potassium, and calcium into and out of cardiac muscles, myocytes.
They target certain channels at a cellular level to slow or break the abnormal rhythm. They often do nothing to fix or correct the problem. ...Read more

13

13
Do anti arrhythmic drugs work on sinus tachycardia?

Depends on type.: Most of the time sinus tachycardia (ST) isn't a harmful condition, and therefore does not require treatment. Rather, the REASON for sinus tachycardia should be investigated - if it's something ominous, it should be treated. There are 4 classes of antiarrhythmics. For symptomatic ST that interrupts your life, low doses of Class II (beta-blockers) or Class IV (calcium channel blocker) antiarrhythmic ...Read more

14

14
What is the antiarrythmic drug of choice for paroxysmal Afib started before 1yr in 72yr male hypertensive with mild left ventricular hyper trophy?

A-fib drugs: There are options for treating atrial fibrillation. 1) Use beta blockers &/or calcium blockers to control the heart rate, but this does not prevent a-fib episodes. 2) Anti-arrhythmic drugs vary in effectiveness and side effects: amiodarone, sotalol, flecainide, and dofetilide are used. 3) An ablation procedure is another strategy. Get a consult on HealthTap to look at your particular case! ...Read more

15

15
How does a phycisian decide which anti-arrhythmic drug is best for patients abnormal heart rhythm?

How does a phycisian decide which anti-arrhythmic drug is best for patients abnormal heart rhythm?

Depends: Depends on the rhythm being treated, the underlying condition of the heart, and co-morbid conditions like kidney or liver disease. ...Read more

16

16
What is the definition or description of: antiarrhythmic?

What is the definition or description of: antiarrhythmic?

Rythm treatment: Antiarrythmics treat or prevent the heart from going out of normal sinus rytm. ...Read more

17

17
Why lidocaine can be used for antiarrhythmic, while the bupivacaine not?

Why lidocaine can be used for antiarrhythmic, while the bupivacaine not?

Therapeutic profile: The anti and proarrhythmic effects of bupivacaine have been studied (pubmed id 9605693). Similarly, the local anesthetic properties of class I arrhythmics (function through sodium channel blockade like local anesthetics) have been compared with Lidocaine and bupivacaine. Toxicity of bupivacaine must be understood in the context of complex cardiac effects. See pmid3408033 and tinyurl. Com/bjdzske. ...Read more

18

18
Are propranolol and Sectral (acebutolol) both anti-arrhythmic?

Mildly: They're not actually classified as anti-arrhythmic medications, but are often used for benign arrhythmias such as PSVT and PVCs. ...Read more

19

19
Is there any antihypertensive that doesn't cause impotence (ed) & have an antiarythmatic effect for a 32yrs old male?

Is there any antihypertensive that doesn't cause impotence (ed) & have an antiarythmatic effect for a 32yrs old male?

ED and BP meds: Most anti-hypertensive medicines cause no erectile dysfunction (ed). The major class of drugs that cause ed are beta-blockers. If you are one of those agents, that may be reponsible for your ed. Types of BP meds that can treat some arrhytmias are calicum channle blockers, Diltiazem is one of them and beta blockers. You should see a urologist to see if there are other causes for ed other than meds. ...Read more

21

21
If a72hypertensive male with no significant Echo changes with paroxysmal Afib on cordarone (amiodarone) 200mg what to change to class1c antiarrythmic what is best?

Cardiologist to answ: This is a complex question to answer in this setting. You should talk to a Cardiologist or use Healthtap Prime to discuss in detail. Class 1C antiarrhythmics are not appropriate for most cases of Afib. That being said, fleacainide is probably the most widely used Class 1 drug. Class 4 drugs like Diltiazem are more appropriate for this condition. Again, talk to a Cardiologist. ...Read more

24

24
What is a "medication HA"?

What is a "medication HA"?

I think: Medication headache....a type of frequent or daily headache. I'm not positive though. Need to see what the context the phrase was used. ...Read more

25

25
What is best pain medication?

What is best pain medication?

There are none...: Even the strongest opiates only "take the edge off" for people in chronic pain. Meds are only one part of dealing with the pain. A useful tool, but pain is so necessary for survival that we are not "allowed" to monkey with it much. In acute pain, the transition from miserable to less miserable can be great. In chronic pain, it's just part of the plan. ...Read more

26

26
I need refills on my medications?

Not here: For that you will likely need the prime service of healthtap. Easier to call your pop imo ...Read more

27

27
Are expired medications effective?

Sometimes: Sometimes they are. For the most part, expired drugs simply lose potency once past their expiration date. There are, however, some drugs that actually become harmful if taken after they expire. As such, it is best to throw out any medications you have after a year. ...Read more

28

28
Which pain medication works better?

No answer: The best drug is the one that works with the lowest side effect incidence. That will change between patients. ...Read more

29

29
Safest medication to take for pain?

ASPRIN: Actually no one has decided on 'safest'. Asprin has been around since before you were born and unless you take too much (yes, too much of anything isn't good) most people are okay with it. If the pain it too severe for asprin you need to know what causes it. Good diagnosis is called for. See the dr. ...Read more

30

30
How can I dispose unused medications?

How can I dispose unused medications?

Several options: You can take them to your local pharmacy for proper disposal. Some medically oriented charities will also take medication for distribution to the disadvantaged. ...Read more

Find us on Facebook