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Doctor insights on: Anaphylactic Reaction Treatment

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Dr. John Overholt Dr. Overholt
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
22 years in practice
East Tennessee State University James H. Quillen College of Medicine
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What is the treatment for an anaphylactic reaction to tree nuts like pecans?

What is the treatment for an anaphylactic reaction to tree nuts like pecans?

Epinephrine, 911: People with nut allergy should always have an Epinephrine auto-injector and be versed in its indications and usage. Epinephrine is the first line treatment for anaphylaxis and its use in the field should always be followed by evaluation in an emergency room. Studies have repeatedly shown that delayed administration of Epinephrine is the number one predictor for bad outcomes in anaphylaxis. ...Read more

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Dr. Linda Green Dr. Green
Pediatrics - Allergy & Asthma
41 years in practice
Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University
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What is involved with desensitization therapy when one's reaction to bee stings is anaphylaxis?

What is involved with desensitization therapy when one's reaction to bee stings is anaphylaxis?

Venom allergy shots: Venom immunotherapy (venom shots) is recommended for patients with systemic reactions such as anaphylaxis to stinging insects. Once testing has determined which stinging insects someone is allergic to, gradually increasing doses of venom are injected in the allergists office according to varying schedules. Once the maintenance dosage is reached injections are generally given every 4 to 8 weeks. ...Read more

Dr. Amit Uppal Dr. Uppal
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
12 years in practice
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
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Can anaphylaxis go away on its own, without emergency treatment?

Can anaphylaxis go away on its own, without emergency treatment?

No: True anaphylaxis is a life threatening emergency by definition. There are other forms of allergy that are less serious, and some are called "anaphylactoid" but true anaphylaxis requires emergency treatment. ...Read more

Dr. Corey Clay Dr. Clay
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
6 years in practice
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
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Can a person have anaphylaxis and survive without medical treatment (presuming medical treatment isn't available)?

Can a person have anaphylaxis and survive without medical treatment (presuming medical treatment isn't available)?

Yes: A person can survive. Death is usually from cardiac arrest, which is caused by the body's reaction to the trigger. Normal physiological "breaks" will reverse the reaction, but anaphylaxis is deadly because cardiac arrest can occur before the "breaks" go into effect. Even if survived, the next anaphylactic reaction to the same trigger can be even more exaggerated and the luck may run out ...Read more

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Dr. David Shulan Dr. Shulan
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
37 years in practice
University of Toledo College of Medicine
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What could cause an anaphylactic reaction to horses?

What could cause an anaphylactic reaction to horses?

Allergy: Individuals can develop antibodies that activate inflammatory cells when the antibody binds to materials from horses. It can occur with even very small amount of horse exposure. Why individuals develop the antibodies is likely due to ones genes, environmental exposure and time of life when the exposure occurs. ...Read more

Dr. Heidi Fowler Dr. Fowler
Psychiatry
21 years in practice
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine
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Can you have an anaphylactic reaction to a sweat bee?

Can you have an anaphylactic reaction to a sweat bee?

It would be possible: For people to have allergic reactions to pretty much any type of stinging insect. ...Read more

Dr. Paul Williams Dr. Williams
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
24 years in practice
University of Washington School of Medicine
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How long would you stay in the hospital after having an anaphylactic reaction?

Depends on severity: Most anaphylactic reactions would not require hospitalization unless symptoms were not responding to therapy. Most patients with a severe reaction should be observed in the er for at least 4-6 hours. ...Read more

Dr. Stephen Southard Dr. Southard
Internal Medicine
11 years in practice
Tufts University School of Medicine
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Dr. John Chiu Dr. Chiu
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
53 years in practice
University of Vermont College of Medicine
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Does having a large localized reaction (gets worse each time) to insect stings mean I'm at risk for severe or anaphylactic reaction?

Does having a large localized reaction (gets worse each time) to insect stings mean I'm at risk for severe or anaphylactic reaction?

Controversial: Usually a large local reaction to insect stings is not considered significant enough to warrant venom immunotherapy. Although one cannot be certain as to whether an increasingly larger reaction to each subsequent sting would eventually lead to anaphylaxis, it is prudent to carry an epinephrine autoinjector just in case. ...Read more

Dr. Gary Steven Dr. Steven
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
26 years in practice
Medical College of Wisconsin
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What can cause an anaphylactic reaction?

What can cause an anaphylactic reaction?

Many things: Any allergen can provoke anaphylaxis in a highly allergic person. Various foods, medications, insect venoms, and sometimes airborne allergens can trigger anaphylaxis. If you have symptoms that you think represent anaphylaxis, you should discuss your concerns with an allergist. ...Read more

Dr. Lee Perry Dr. Perry
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
13 years in practice
Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine
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What is considered an anaphylactic reaction?

What is considered an anaphylactic reaction?

Severe reaction: An anaphylactic reaction is an allergic reaction to a trigger such as a food (peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish) or stinging insect (wasp, honeybee, etc.) that involves multiple body systems at the same time. Thus, you might experience hives/rash (skin), cough/shortness of breath (respiratory), vomithing/diarrhea (gastrointestinal)--these symptoms usually occur within minutes of exposure to a trigger. ...Read more

Dr. Lee Perry Dr. Perry
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
13 years in practice
Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine
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What are the symptoms of having a systemic anaphylactic reaction?

What are the symptoms of having a systemic anaphylactic reaction?

Severe reaction: An anaphylactic reaction is an allergic reaction to a trigger such as a food (peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish) or stinging insect (wasp, honeybee, etc.) that involves multiple body systems at the same time. Thus, you might experience hives/rash (skin), cough/shortness of breath (respiratory), vomithing/diarrhea (gastrointestinal)--these symptoms usually occur within minutes of exposure to a trigger. ...Read more

Dr. Edwin Medina Dr. Medina
General Practice
35 years in practice
Central University of the East School of Medicine (UCE)
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What are the signs and symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction?

What are the signs and symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction?

Shortness of breath: It is a severe allergic reaction in which a given patients immune system reacts violently to a stimulus (antigen). It can produce signs of shock, shortness of breath, wheezing, low blood pressure, confusion, combativeness and if untreated....Death. ...Read more

Dr. Nayla Mumneh Dr. Mumneh
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
25 years in practice
State University of New York Downstate Medical Center College of Medicine
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Is it possible to have an anaphylactic reaction during your sleep?

Is it possible to have an anaphylactic reaction during your sleep?

Interesting: So how do you know? Does it wake you up and how do you feel. Idiopathic anaphylaxis can happen anytime, it may be triggered by exercise, but it rarely happens during sleep. Mastocytosis is also a cause of anaphylaxis, but usually symptoms are daytime. ...Read more

Dr. Lee Perry Dr. Perry
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
13 years in practice
Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine
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What is the difference between getting anaphylactic shock and an anaphylactic reaction?

What is the difference between getting anaphylactic shock and an anaphylactic reaction?

Similar: They are similar, but the word "shock" suggests that the reaction has progressed in severity. ...Read more

Dr. Paul Williams Dr. Williams
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
24 years in practice
University of Washington School of Medicine
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Can you get an anaphylactic reaction just by smelling something you are really allergic to?

Can you get an anaphylactic reaction just by smelling something you are really allergic to?

Not likely: Anaphylactic reactions require ingestion of the allergen. Vapors from foods do not contain the proteins responsible for the allergic reaction. ...Read more

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Dr. Lee Perry Dr. Perry
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
13 years in practice
Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine
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Is it possible to have an anaphylactic reaction to horses and react just by being around them?

Yes: Yes, it is possible to have a severe allergic reaction to horses just "by being around them." an anaphylactic reaction would be very unlikely, however. More likely symptoms might include runny nose, nasal congestion, sneeze and pruritus (itching of the eyes/nose). ...Read more

Dr. Amrit Singh Dr. Singh
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
47 years in practice
Baba Farid University of Health Sciences, Government Medical College, Patiala
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In general, what does epinephrine do, i.e. how does it work to remedy anaphylactic reaction? Thank you.

In general, what does epinephrine do, i.e. how does it work to remedy anaphylactic reaction? Thank you.

In many: ways it helps- acts on a number of receptors causes constriction, or tightening, of the blood vessels, which decreases swelling and also helps to increase blood pressure, increases the heart’s contraction and heart rate, which can help to prevent or reverse cardiovascular collapse. Epinephrine relaxes the muscles around the airways in the lun ...Read more

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Dr. Michael Zacharisen Dr. Zacharisen
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
29 years in practice
Medical College of Wisconsin
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I was wondering if i could have an anaphylactic reaction just from a kiss on the hand?

I was wondering if i could have an anaphylactic reaction just from a kiss on the hand?

Unlikely: Most severe allergic reactions are triggered when the allergen is eaten (ingested), inhaled or injected (bee sting or allergy shot). The hands typically have thick skin and an allergen will not be easily absorbed through the hand unless the skin has lost its barrier function like from a rash. ...Read more