Top
20
Doctor insights on: Alzheimer's Vs Senility

Share
1

1
Differences between senile dementia and altzheimers disease?

Differences between senile dementia and altzheimers disease?

They are the same: It used to be thought that alzheimers only happened to young people-what we now call early onset alzheimers dementia. It was also thought that getting senile happened to all older adults. We now know senility and dementia are not normal aging. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
Dr. Steven Griggs
14 doctors shared insights

Senility (Definition)

Senility = physical & mental changes that ...Read more


Dr. Joel Ross Dr. Ross
4 doctors agreed:
2

2
Is Alzheimer's or dementia hereditary?

Dr. Joel Ross Dr. Ross
4 doctors agreed:
Is Alzheimer's or dementia hereditary?

Yes to some degree: 60% of all pts with Alzheimer's Disease have first degree relative (often a parent) that had AD. There are genetic tests one called ApoE4 which can indicate you are low, medium or high risk in your life to develop this illness. I do not recommend such testing as there are no proven treatments that can slow or prevent Alzheimer's Disease from developing. Stay active mentally and physically! ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
3

3
What is sundowning vs dementia?

What is sundowning vs dementia?

Sundowning is a: Symptom that can occur in dementia patients. It refers to misperceiving the environment or outright halliucinations whch usually occur at or after sundown, hence the name. Dementia is a degenerative illness which effects the brain and inhibits a person's ability to function. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
4

4
Which is deadlier, vascular dementia or alzheimers?

Which is deadlier, vascular dementia or alzheimers?

Depends: A large stroke can lead to vascular dementia and if you had one stroke you are at high risk of having another. Alzheimer's has a more predictable progression in general but everyone is unique so generalizations are difficult. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
5

5
What's the difference between senility, Alzheimer's and dementia?

Good question: Dementia is a general term to indicate loss of cognitive function due to a progressive disorder, and includes many diseases, including alzheimer's which is the most common cause of dementia. Senility supposedly refers to cognitive changes of aging, but is a corrupt term, as 50% of the elderly have relatively normal intellect by the age of 85. ...Read more

6

6
Whats the difference between presenile and senile dementia and altzheimers disease?

Whats the difference between presenile and senile dementia and altzheimers disease?

Dementia: Is a general term for memory loss. Presenile simply means a dementia that occurred before expected. Senile means dementia that has occurred at a "more appropriate" age. Alzheimer's is a particular type of dementia. ...Read more

7

7
Alzheimers versus Parkinson's disease, what's the difference?

Alzheimers versus Parkinson's disease, what's the difference?

Not associated: Both are disorders of "misfolded proteins" which deposit in the brain affecting specific nerve cell populations. The signs and symptoms are very different, such as tremors, gait imbalance, stiffness of parkinson's. The dementias are very different and treatments vary from case to case. It is rare, . ...Read more

8

8
Is sundowning a symptom of alzheimer's dementia?

Is sundowning a symptom of alzheimer's dementia?

Sundowning: Can be a symptom of dementia of any kind when combined with physical problems such as hearing and vision loss. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
9

9
What's the difference between Alzheimer's and senile dementia?

"senile" = outdated: The term "senile" was used in older classification systems and is no longer valid. It implies old age, cognitive impairment, and is very nonspecific. The appropriate descriptive terms for dementia should be the etiology (alzheimer's, vascular, picks, lewy body, and others). ...Read more

See 3 more doctor answers
10

10
What is presenile dementia?

What is presenile dementia?

Early onset dementia: Presenile dementia refers to dementia occurring in younger persons, usually age 65 or younger; since most cases are due to alzheimer's disease, the term is sometimes used as a synonym of dementia of the alzheimer type, early onset. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
11

11
Is there hereditary component of senile dementia?

Yes to DAT and FTD: For early onset Alzheimer's, there are 3 rare genes that increase risk markedly. These are very rare. For late onset, there in one gene that elevates risk some. For frontotemporal dementias, genetics are behind about 40% of those cases. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
7 doctors agreed:
12

12
Is vascular dementia hereditary?

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
7 doctors agreed:

Vascular Dementia: Major risk factors are advancing age, with cardiovascular problems, cholesterol, sugar problems, smoking & alcohol. ...Read more

13

13
What is frontotemporal dementia?

There are 3 types: Named for the brain areas that are affected, the frontal and temporal lobes, there are several different variants of this type of dementia. Some of these types of dementia have prominent problems with words - either slowly losing the ability to speak or losing the ability to makes sense when one talks. There is an impulsive, disinhibited personality variant also. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
14

14
What is frontotemporal type of dementia?

See below: It affects the frontal lobes (front) and temporal lobes (sides) of the brain. Onset is usually earlier than alzheimer's. Initial sx may involve changes in personality, judgement and social functioning. Pick's disease is one of the forms of the frontotemporal dementia. Here's a link to fuller description of the disease http://www.Alz.Org/alzheimers_disease_frontotemporal_dementia.Asp. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
15

15
Is schizophrenia related to other brain diseases such as dementia or senility?

Is schizophrenia related to other brain diseases such as dementia or senility?

Schizophrenia: Not necessarily, check with your treating doctor if you are concerned with memory difficulties. Best. ...Read more

16

16
How is vascular dementia different than other types of dementia?

How is  vascular dementia different than other types of dementia?

Vascular dementia: Vascular dementia may overlap with other types of dementia such as alzheimer's, but results from damage to, or blockages in, blood vessels that nourish the brain. This leads to tiny "infarcts" or deaths of nerve cells in the brain. People with hypertension and/or arteriosclerotic narrowing of these blood vessels are vulnerable to such changes, which happen in a stair-step process over time. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
17

17
In what ways does vascular dementia differ from alzheimer's disease?

In what ways does vascular dementia differ from alzheimer's disease?

Strokes in VaD: Alzheimer's and vascular dementia (VAD) frequently co-exist. The main evidence for VAD is based on clinical or radiological evidence for stroke. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
18

18
Is vascular dementia and alzheimer's the same disease?

No: Vascular dementia is due to multiple infarcts of the brain from abnormalities in blood vessels. Alzheimer's is a degenerative neurologic disease with plaques and abnormal protein deposition. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
19

19
Vitreous degeneration vs pvd--different symptoms?

Vitreous degeneration vs pvd--different symptoms?

Same: Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) occurs when the vitreous gel becomes more like a liquid. The solid component of the gel floats in the liquid component of the gel. This liquefaction process is basically vitreous "degeneration." the symptoms are floaters (black spots, cobwebs, bugs) and sometimes flashes of light. ...Read more

20

20
Neurodegenerative disease (alzeihmer) or dementia or depression in my grandparent?

Without knowing : Your grandparent, i can't say. All dementias are neurodegenerative illnesses in one way or another. And, yes, depression in older patients can present with memory problems. Have your grandparent evaluated by a geriatric psychiatrist to help you figure this out. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer