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Doctor insights on: Alternative Treatments For Vitreous Detachment

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What are possible treatments for vitreous detachment in a 14 year old?

What are possible treatments for vitreous detachment in a 14 year old?

Unusual case: Vitreous detachment is very rare in this age group and usually only comes about from pathology of the eye or trauma. Vitreous detachment usually starts in middle age. There is no "treatment" for this as it is a natural progression in the eye. If this is occurring in a 14 year old, then it must be investigated by an ophthalmologist to rule out concurrent disease. ...Read more

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How do you diagnose retinal tears and vitreous detachment?

How do you diagnose retinal tears and vitreous detachment?

Dilated exam: A dilated eye examination can reveal these problems. Eye drops are used to stop the pupil from constricting when light is shone into them. This helps the doctor get a good view of the entire retina to check for these sorts of problems. ...Read more

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Can you explain to me what posterior vitreous detachment is?

Can you explain to me what posterior vitreous detachment is?

Normal aging: Vitreous detachment is a normal aging process of the gel that fills the back of the eye. Usually it detaches silently but sometimes it happens in a few locations with light flashes, floaters and visual changes. Since these symptoms are the same as retinal detachment these symptoms should always be evaluated by an ophthalmologist when they occur. ...Read more

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If I develop posterior vitreous detachment, how will it be treated?

If I develop posterior vitreous detachment, how will it be treated?

Rule out retina hole: Typical vitreous detachments are a normal aging process of the jelly in the vitreous cavity. If you develope floaters and/or flashes you should seek the care of an ophthalmologist to evaluate you for a retinal tear or hole or a retinal detachment. If no problems are found no treatment is needed. The floaters usually subside, to the most part, over weeks and months but may not totally go away. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: posterior vitreous detachment?

What is the definition or description of: posterior vitreous detachment?

Vitreous separation: The vitreous jelly is normally attached to the back of the eye (posteriorly), to the optic nerve and macula (central retina). When this collagenous jelly separates from these normal attachment areas, it's called a posterior vitreous detachment (pvd). This happens with age (normal and most common reason), trauma, eye surgery, nearsightedness. A retinal tear or detachment can also be concurrent. ...Read more

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What can you tell me about retinal and posterior vitreous detachment?

What can you tell me about retinal and posterior vitreous detachment?

See below: It is difficult to tell whether there is a retinal detachment by the patient him/her self when there are vitreous detachment symptoms. Flashes and floaters are warning signs, but very non-specific. If there is peripheral vision loss that progresses and closes in on central vision, than that is quite likely a retinal detachment. Especially if accompanied or presided by flashes and or floaters. ...Read more

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How long does it take to complete vitreous detachment to pvd full cycle in young high myope population, is da process cycle faster in young myopes?

How long does it take to complete vitreous detachment to pvd full cycle in young high myope population, is da process cycle faster in young myopes?

Full cycle?: The natural progression of vitreous detachment is simple in that the vitreous attachment come off the area of attachment where the retina ends. The vitreous contracts tugging on the retina, causing flashing light symptoms. This usually resolve and the vitreous floater can get smaller. Not really a cycle! Timing is person to person, - can be days to weeks, high myopia is a risk factor ...Read more

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Is vitreous detachment caused by rubbing eye?

Is vitreous detachment caused by rubbing eye?

Possibly: Vitreous detachments can occur spontaneously, or from trauma. Vigorous eye rubbing could possibly cause enough trauma to precipitate a vitreous detachment. ...Read more

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What is posterior vitreous detachment?

What is posterior vitreous detachment?

See below: A posterior vitreous detachment is a condition of the eye in which the vitreous humour separates from the retina.
Broadly speaking, the condition is common for older adults and over 75% of those over the age of 65 develop it. Although less common among people in their 40s or 50s, the condition is not rare for those individuals. Some research has found that the condition is more common among women. ...Read more

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Regular floater or vitreous detachment?

Regular floater or vitreous detachment?

See a retina special: As we age, the vitreous jelly pulls away from the retina (a posterior vitreous detachment). New or worse floaters in your vision or flashing lights or loss of peripheral vision (like a curtain or veil obstructing the vision) could indicate a retinal detachment. These symptoms require an urgent dilated retinal exam. Do not delay. ...Read more

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Can posterior vitreous detachment last for a year or more?

Can posterior vitreous detachment last for a year or more?

Yes, it can: A posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a condition of the eye in which the vitreous membrane separates from the retina. A common symptom is flashes of light (photopsia). There is a small risk of a retinal tear / detachment. Duration of PVD is usually 4-6 weeks, but can be sudden (trauma), days (after cataract surgery), months, or rarely a year or more. Nearsighted people tend to get PVD earlier. ...Read more

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I see a cloudy posterior vitreous detachment. Will it get better?

I see a cloudy posterior vitreous detachment. Will it get better?

Needs evaluation: Hopefully you have been evaluated to be certain there is no underlying retinal detachment. The debris from a vitreous detachment in the absence of a retinal detachment, generally clears up in several weeks but commonly leaves a few spots or strings of stuff that you can see in your vision lasting sometimes for years. ...Read more

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What are the consequences of having posterior vitreous detachment?

What are the consequences of having posterior vitreous detachment?

Floaters: Typically the only consequence of having a posterior vitreal detachment (PVD) is the perception of floating objects in your vision. Rarely, the PVD can be associated with tears in the peripheral retina and holes/swelling of the central retina. Follow up as directed by your eye doctor after the diagnosis of PVD in order to check for these complications. ...Read more

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How commonly does someone need a retinal repair surgery after post vitreous detachment.

Retinal tear 7-15%: Pvd itself doesn't require treatment. However 7-15% of symptomatic PVD cases (floaters, flashes, decreased vision) have an associated retinal tear that only an ophthalmologist will be able to detect. Retinal tears need to be repaired to prevent retinal detachment. ...Read more

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Is vitreous detachment similar to retinal detachment?

Is vitreous detachment similar to retinal detachment?

Yes: The vitreous jelly that fills the eye and attaches to the back wall of the inside of the eye (the retina) will detach from the retina with age (posterior vitreous detachment). At that time or days/weeks later a retinal tear or detachment may or may not occur as well. The latter conditions require urgent treatment before blindness ensues. A vitreous detachment is not treated. ...Read more

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Is there any homeopathic medicine for posterior vitreous detachment?

Collaborative care: For this, you really need the care of a good ophthalmologist to start with. A homeopathic physician would be able to also assess your symptoms from his/her perspective and find the homeopathic medicine that might work well for you in conjunction with conventional treatment. Although there are multiple medicines possible, homeopathic gelsemium is one known to help in retinal detachment. ...Read more

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I was diagnosed with vitreous detachment and retinal detachment. Help me please?

Vitreous detachment: Is normal as we age and doesn't require treatment. Retinal detachment (rd) on the other hand can lead to complete loss of vision in the eye and is not normal. If you feel that you have an rd then usually some type of treatment is advisable to repair it or prevent it from getting worse. I would discuss with your doctor right away since an rd can cause permanent loss of vision. ...Read more

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Can an opthalmologist see retinal tears or vitreous detachment with ophthalmoscope?

Can an opthalmologist see retinal tears or vitreous detachment with ophthalmoscope?

Yes: An ophthalmologist, especially a retina specialist, can see these things with an ophthalmoscope and treat them as appropriate. ...Read more

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Has the injectable diabetes drug, bydureon, (exenatide) been linked to shrinking vitreous or vitreous detachment? This happened to me after 5 months on this drug

Has the injectable diabetes drug, bydureon, (exenatide) been linked to shrinking vitreous or vitreous detachment? This happened to me after 5 months on this drug

Not aware of: Not aware of this occurring, however it is recommended to report this to the manufacturer as they track all possible side effects and would be more than willing to disclose any reactions they have documented on file. You can google the co. And I am sure find a toll free 1-800 "pharmacovigilence#.". ...Read more

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If prior retinal tear, risk at 60 of developing a retinal detachment or a posterior vitreous detachment?

If prior retinal tear, risk at 60 of developing a retinal detachment or a posterior vitreous detachment?

See a retina special: You do have a somewhat increased risk of developing a retinal detachment if you've had a retinal tear (even if it was treated), though you should speak to your retina specialist to gauge your true risk based on your exam. Everyone develops posterior vitreous detachments as we age - that is regardless of having had a tear or not. ...Read more

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After 6 weeks of vitreous detachment, can you still have a detached retina?

After 6 weeks of vitreous detachment, can you still have a detached retina?

Possible: The high risk window for a detachment to occur is about 3 weeks. If you are still having flashing lights or floaters, or develop vision loss six weeks out, get checked by ophthalmologist asap. ...Read more

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Hw long does posterior vitreous detachment usually take in 30-40 age group of high myopes according to your experience? Does pvd last a lifetime 4 dem

4-6 weeks; yes: Most often PVD takes 4 to 6 weeks to complete, but that time can vary greatly from instant to more than one year. Once the vitreous detaches, it does not ever reattach. There would be no advantage to the patient if it did. ...Read more

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Does vitreous degeneration always lead to a posterior vitreous detachment (pvd) or pvd may not happen altogether in presence of vitreous degeneration?

Does vitreous degeneration always lead to a posterior vitreous detachment (pvd) or pvd may not happen altogether in presence of vitreous degeneration?

PVD: Vitreous degeneration almost always leads to a pvd. Most pvds are benign, but a few may lead to a retinal tear or detachment...So they should be seen by your local eye doctor. ...Read more

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Can a person have posterior vitreous detachment on both eyes far apart?

Can a person have posterior vitreous detachment on both eyes far apart?

In time? Yes.: If you are asking can you have first one eye, and then much later experience a PVD in the other eye, then yes, very possible. Usually pvds occur spontaneously, although they can occur from trauma as well. ...Read more

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Docs, could a retinoscope with pupil dilated identify a post vitreous detachment?

Docs, could a retinoscope with pupil dilated identify a post vitreous detachment?

Ophthalmoscope: These conditions can be identified with an ophthalmoscope (a retinoscope is used to measure eyeglass power). Dilation of the pupil is usually necessary. This requires some experience and training which ophthalmologists do have (not really a skill for optometrists). ...Read more

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Could getting posterior vitreous detachment automatically mean you will one day get retinal detachment?

PVD = RD? Sometimes: A posterior vitreous detachment or PVD can occur spontaneously and is perfectly normal. This separation of vitreous from the retina can sometimes result in a tear and/or detachment. This is the exception rather than the rule. Signs of a PVD are new floaters or flashes in the eye. About 15% of patient's with acute symptoms of PVD have retinal tears. A dilated retinal exam is essential! ...Read more

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Can anyone tell me is vitreous detachment after a retinal detachment surgery risking another retinal detachment?

Unusual: Most retinal detachments are preceded by a vitreous detachment. There are some exception, however those are uncommon or rare. As such, it is unlikely to have a vitreous detachment following retinal re-attachment surgery. If there was no vitreous detachment prior to retina re-detachment surgeyr, and no vitrectomy was done, a vitreous detachment could occur with it's risks. ...Read more