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Doctor insights on: Alternative Treatments For Myasthenia Gravis

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Dr. Julian Bragg
358 doctors shared insights

Myasthenia Gravis (Definition)

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune condition in which the body produces a protein that blocks information transmission along nerves. This leads to symptoms such as droopy ...Read more


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What is the treatment for myasthenia gravis?

What is the treatment for myasthenia gravis?

Multiple: About 1/3 can see spontaneous remission, 1/3 stabilize on chronic medications, and 1/3 have progressive difficulties. Chronic and/or longterm medications may aid but can have significant adverse impact on life and/or health. In appropriate candidates, thoracic surgery to remove thymus (thymectomy) can possibly cure: http://goo.Gl/3xxmd. ...Read more

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Why is neostigmine preferred over edrophonium as a treatment for myasthenia gravis?

Why is neostigmine preferred over edrophonium as a treatment for myasthenia gravis?

Different uses: Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are the first line of treatment due to their safety and ease of use. Pyridostigmine (Mestinon) is the usual choice. Neostigmine is available but not commonly used. Edrophonium is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor but does not come in an oral form. It is mainly used as a diagnostic agent for MG. ...Read more

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What is the acoustic wave therapy influence on muscles affected by myasthenia gravis?

What is the acoustic wave therapy influence on muscles affected by myasthenia gravis?

Not sure: This doesn't sound like "conventional" therapy, but if it doesn't hurt/cost much/is harmful, then why not try? More conventional wisdom on mg can be found here: http://www.Ninds.Nih.Gov/disorders/myasthenia_gravis/detail_myasthenia_gravis.Htm. ...Read more

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My thyroid function tests show I'm euthyroid,orbital usg is normal. Could it be myasthenia gravis?

My thyroid function tests show I'm euthyroid,orbital usg is normal. Could it be myasthenia gravis?

The problem?: Hi. You haven't told us much. It sounds like someone might have thought you had Graves' disease, and ruled that out. Myasthenia gravis (MG), another autoimmune disease, has vision problems as a prominent feature. MG is just about as rare as hen's teeth, however. There are easy tests for MG. Good luck! ...Read more

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Thyroid function tests show i'm euthyroid, orbital usg is normal. Is it possibly myasthenia gravis?

Depends: There are a number of test that may confirm/deny myasthenia gravis. Acetylcholine receptor antibodies are a good start. If you are having visual issues and are concerned about myasthenia gravis, see either a neuro-ophthalmologist or neurologist. ...Read more

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Myasthenia Gravis, NOW severe osteoporosis &supposed to start Forteo shots daily! I'm scared as I DON'T want MG flare. Do u foresee any risks?

Myasthenia Gravis, NOW severe osteoporosis &supposed to start Forteo shots daily! I'm scared as I DON'T want MG flare. Do u foresee any risks?

No: Don't see any unusual risk from Forteo because of MG. It is important for you to get your osteoporosis treated since a major fracture will be devastating to someone who already has problem with muscle strength. ...Read more

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Myasthenia Gravis HAVE to be on osteoporosis med. I'm severe!Interactions with Reclast (zoledronic acid) IV & MG? Scared once in system what if it flares my MG?

Myasthenia Gravis HAVE to be on osteoporosis med. I'm severe!Interactions with Reclast (zoledronic acid) IV & MG? Scared once in system what if it flares my MG?

Osteoporosis meds: One issue with some medications used in rheumatoid arthritis, is presence of anti-tumor necrosis factor action, which can make MS worse, but this mechanism does not seem salient in osteoporosis drugs, and these would be very unlikely to adversely affect Myasthenia, as Reclast (zoledronic acid) does not affect acetylcholine in any profound way. Discuss further with your doctor, but I do NOT see a problem. ...Read more

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How safe is it to have a baby if I have myasthenia gravis? I know people do it, but what are the risks? Both to me and the baby? Will I have to go off my meds? Will i pass the disease on to my baby? I’d really like to have a baby, but i’m worried. My doc

How safe is it to have a baby if I have myasthenia gravis? I know people do it, but what are the risks? Both to me and the baby?  Will I have to go off my meds? Will i pass the disease on to my baby? I’d really like to have a baby, but i’m worried. My doc

The : The more common kind of myasthenia gravis is an acquired condition: your body is tricked into making antibodies that attack its own acetylcholine receptors on the surface of your muscles, reducing the ability of your nerves to activate them, and leading to weakness. There is another, much rarer type of myasthenia gravis that is not acquired, but genetic. Women with acquired myasthenia gravis won't pass the disease itself on to their children, but since the myasthnia antibodies made by mom can cross the placenta into the circulation of the fetus, the fetus can be affected temporarily (mom's antibodies can stay in the baby up to several weeks after birth). This condition is called neonatal myasthenia gravis. Newborns with neonatal myasthenia can have temporary weakness of limb muscles, breathing muscles, and feeding muscles. They can also have a condition called arthrogryposis, stiff joints with limited range of flexibility because they didn't move as much in the womb as they might have otherwise. This is why it is important to have acquired myasthenia gravis well-controlled throughout pregnancy. There are many different kinds of medications used to control myasthenia. Some of them, particularly the immunosuppressants (like methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetic) are known to cause harm to the baby if taken during pregancy, while breastfeeding, or even prior to conception. Other treatments such as steroids and ivig are less risky (but not zero risk). Women with myasthenia who are considering pregnancy should work very closely with a team including a neurologist experienced in the treatment of myasthenia gravis, an obstetrician and a neonatologist. This is the best way to reduce worry, and risk, as much as possible. For general information about myasthenia gravis, visit the myasthenia gravis foundation of america website at www.Myasthenia.Org. ...Read more

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Who can develop myasthenia gravis?

Women>men: Before the age of 40 mg is 3x more common in women, but at older ages both sexes are equally affected. Familial cases are rare. Congenital mg in children are rarely encountered. Their mothers are asymptomatic, and the condition is often familial. Limb weakness is present but eye movement weakness is the dominant sign. There are also neonatal forms characterized by weak suck, and juvenile forms. ...Read more

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