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Doctor insights on: Allergy Seasonal

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Can a 2 month old infant have allergies? Seasonal allergies?

Can a 2 month old infant have allergies? Seasonal allergies?

Rarely: Congestion is a normal response of the airway to inhaled dust, fumes, dry heat, pollen, etc. As well as infection. Airway mucous traps debris particles and works to remove them. Vaporizers help thin heavy mucous in some. Avoid cleaning products with heavy odors, perfumes, and smoke and change ac filters often. A particle filter for babys room may also help.Nasal saline as a wash is helpful. ...Read more

Dr. John Chiu
2,630 doctors shared insights

Allergies (Definition)

Allergies occur when your immune system is triggered by envirionmental factors it should ignore--for example, pollen in the air, or dander on a cat or dog--and creates cells to fight against them. An allergic reaction typically causes itching, congestion, or drainage, and ...Read more


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My nostrils scab up every morning. Started last year and went away after a few months. It's back. No known allergies or seasonal allergies.

My nostrils scab up every morning. Started last year and went away after a few months. It's back. No known allergies or seasonal allergies.

Dryness?: Could be you have dry nasal passages. Try nasal saline spray, Ayr gel, vasoline applied on a qtip, or Ponaris drops. If one or all of these over the counter things don't work..see your ENT ...Read more

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Been treated for uti's which return. usually on omnicef to prevent them when needed. doctors are looking into why this happens (endometrosis, etc). now I have bronchitis like symptoms, fevers, mucus drainage, no allergies, just seasonal and antihistimes d

Been treated for uti's which return. usually on omnicef to prevent them when needed. doctors are looking into why this happens (endometrosis, etc). now I have bronchitis like symptoms, fevers, mucus drainage, no allergies, just seasonal and antihistimes d

Uti's: Recurrent uti can occur after vaginal intercourse,taking baths instead of showers,wearing very tight jeans,or from structural anatomic abnormalities of the urinary tract. A Urologist is best qualified to evaluate and treat you. If bronchitis is not improving a course of appropriate antibiotics should help. ...Read more

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Reduce severe seasonal allergies?

Reduce severe seasonal allergies?

Meds & allergy shots: The best treatment for seasonal allergy is immunotherapy (allergy shots), which can cure the disease altogether. Medications such as antihistamines and nasal steroids are possible treatments as well. ...Read more

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How can I cure seasonal allergies?

How can I cure seasonal allergies?

Go for control: While a "cure" is unlikely, seasonal allergies can be controlled long term by undergoing allergen immunotherapy or allergy shots. They work for 80% of persons and can decrease symptoms and medication need. After 3-5 years of injections, most people have long lasting relief after injections are stopped. Medications help, but as soon after meds are stopped, symptoms return. ...Read more

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How to deal with seasonal allergies?

How to deal with seasonal allergies?

Antihistamines: There are several newer antihistamines that are now over the counter. Allegra, zyrtec and Claritin (loratadine) to name a few. Try these at suggested dosage. If they don't work, see your doctor. ...Read more

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How to deal with your seasonal allergies?

How to deal with your seasonal allergies?

Medications or Shots: For some people over the counter antihistamines control many allergy symptoms like sneezing, runny & itchy nose. For nasal congestion, post nasal drip & headache, a prescription corticosteroid spray is often needed. For some people medications don't completely control symptoms or they must take them continuously. Allergy shots help get rid of the cause of allergy and decrease medication needs. ...Read more

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What to take for your seasonal allergies?

What to take for your seasonal allergies?

See below: There are three main treatment options: avoidance, medications and allergy shots. Medications include oral antihistamines, nasal antihistamines and steroids and limited use of decongestants. ...Read more

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How long do seasonal allergies last, help?

How long do seasonal allergies last, help?

Seasonal allergy: As the terminology says, it would last until the season is over. I suppose what you refer to as seasonal allergy is seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or hay fever like diseases. You should check with your local allergist to see if it is the case and which seasons you are likely to be affected. ...Read more

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Can children grow out of seasonal allergies?

Can children grow out of seasonal allergies?

Sometimes: Some people's allergies get better over years, some get worse, and some are stable. Keeping allergies well-controlled not only keeps kids feeling better and sleeping better, but also doing better in school (it's hard to learn material when you feel miserable)! also, keeping allergies under control decreases the risk of ear infections and sinusitis. ...Read more

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What medicine to take for seasonal allergies?

Several choices: The most effective treatment for relief of seasonal allergies are prescription nasal steroid sprays (qnasl, nasonex, (mometasone) rhinocort, flonase). If symptoms are mild then over the counter zyrtec, claritin, or Allegra can help. It's best to start treating seasonal allergies before the "season" starts. This is a prevention approach. If the above meds haven't controlled symptoms, consider allergy shots. ...Read more

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What can I do to deal with seasonal allergies?

What can I do to deal with seasonal allergies?

Plan ahead: Once symptoms start, they are more difficult to control. Avoidance of pollen is frequently not practical. Medications can be very helpful especially if taken before the pollen starts blowing around. Allergy injections are the best long term treatment. An allergist can assist in an individualized treatment plan. ...Read more

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What are good options for ?Seasonal allergies?

What are good options for ?Seasonal allergies?

Seasonal treatment: Otc medications such as Loratadine started a few weeks before the "season" and continued until the season is complete. More targeted therapy such as eye drops and nasal antihistamines or steroids may do just as well or be added to the Loratadine if necessary. ...Read more

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What are the best seasonal allergy medications?

Several choices: There is no shortage of medications available for treating seasonal allergies. Over the counter antihistamines such as zyrtec and Allegra are good, as well as prescription nasal sprays (stay away from over the counter nasal sprays). Singulair (montelukast) is another option for treating seasonal allergies. ...Read more

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How best to stop your child's seasonal allergies?

How best to stop your child's seasonal allergies?

Immunotherapy: It is difficult to avoid seasonal allergens, so we often use medications first. These due a great job of reducing the effects of the inflammatory response to allergens, but allergy shots work best - they desensitize your child so there is no allergic inflammation in the first place. Further, it is only shots, not medications, that reduce the likelihood of your child developing asthma over time. ...Read more

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How to relieve seasonal allergies in natural way?

How to relieve seasonal allergies in natural way?

Allergy injections: The most natural way to control significant seasonal allergies that is proven by scientific method is allergy injections [allergy shots]. Over time, the injections can decrease a persons sensitivity that last beyond when the shots were stopped. Medications treat symptoms; allergy shots are "disease modifying" season after season after season. The science on supplements, herbals, etc is lacking. ...Read more

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What is the best way to manage seasonal allergies?

Allergy Control: Medications used regularly usually help (claritin, allegra, (fexofenadine) zurtec, etc). It's always helpful to limit your exposure to allergens... Close your windows, encase your bedding, use a certified hepa vacuum cleaner, eliminate fabric softeners and scents, banish pets from the bedroom, etc. See your doctor, allergist or ENT specialist if your symptoms don't improve. ...Read more

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