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Doctor insights on: Alcoholic Hepatitis Vs Alcoholic Liver Disease

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Is non alcoholic fatty liver disease reversible?

Is non alcoholic fatty liver disease reversible?

NAFLD: Yes. Usually with weight loss through exercise and diet. Certainly should avoid other insults to the liver with this (ie alcohol). ...Read more

Dr. Liawaty Ho
2 doctors shared insights

Liver (Definition)

This organ plays a major role in metabolism and has a number of functions in the body, including glycogen storage, decomposition of red blood cells, plasma protein synthesis, hormone production, and detoxification. It lies below the diaphragm in the abdominal-pelvic region of the abdomen. It produces bile, an alkaline compound which aids in digestion via the emulsification of ...Read more


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What is non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (or nafld)?

What is non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (or nafld)?

See below: This is a disease where fat is abnormally deposited in the liver. It can lead to inflammation and ultimately cirrhosis. It is the most common liver disease in the US and is related to obesity, diabetes, elevated triglycerides and genetics. ...Read more

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How serious a disease is non alcoholic fatty liver disease?

How serious a disease is non alcoholic fatty liver disease?

Read on: Read this short article: 1.https://www.kaushikmd.com/fatty-liver-on-a-rise-with-diabetes-and-obesity-epidemics/

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How are alcoholic liver disease and viral hepatitis different?

How are alcoholic liver disease and viral hepatitis different?

Different causes: One is caused by alcohol and the other is caused by a virus which infects the liver, hepatitis b and c are the most common causes of chronic viral hepatitis. As both of these affect and damage the liver they may have similar symptoms such a jaundice and evenually cirrhosis. The treatment however would be different. Having a viral hepatitis and drinking would speed the progression of the damage. ...Read more

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Safe antidiabetic in alcoholic liver disease?

Safe antidiabetic in alcoholic liver disease?

Antibiotic: There are numerous antibiotics that would be safe. However, of course every illness has its own prescribed regimen. Also if a hepatic impaired patient does have to take a medicine that can impact their liver then often the dose is lowered and liver function is followed closely. ...Read more

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What is the difference between non-alcoholic atty liver disease and liver cirhosis?

What is the difference between non-alcoholic atty liver disease and liver cirhosis?

12: Liver cirrhosis is the final result of all forms of liver injury which are commonly alcohol, hepatitis c, b, certain drugs etc. Non-alcoholic liver disease is another form of liver injury which is a result of excessive fat deposition in liver cells and can result in liver cirrhosis in later stages. In earlier stages it will be causing liver inflammation also known as steatohepatitis. ...Read more

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Is nonalcoholic steatohepatitis terminal? Is cirrhosis inevitable?

Is nonalcoholic steatohepatitis terminal?  Is cirrhosis inevitable?

Not terminal: Nonalcoholic fatty liver is not terminal but in time can develop into cirrhosis and can morph into very serious liver disease. It's important to avoid any potential liver toxins including alcohol and to adhere to low fat diet. In recent years it is taken much more seriously and should be followed by a hepatologist or gastroenterologist. ...Read more

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Is nonalcoholic steatohepatitis terminal? Is cirrhosis inevitable?

No: Steatohepatitis is reversible. Not easy, but you need to lose weight, reduce your intake of fats, if you are diabetic, control diabetes, exercise. Get vaccination for hepatitis A and B. Consult this site for more information and see a gastroenterologist. http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/tc/nonalcoholic-steatohepatitis-nash-overview ...Read more

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Can lupus cause non-alcoholic fatty liver?

Can lupus cause non-alcoholic fatty liver?

Autoimmune hepatitis: Lupus is associated with autoimmune hepatitis, not nash (non-alcoholic fatty liver). Nash is commonly see in settings of obesity, excessive alcohol intake, diabetes, high cholesterol. Both entities can occur together when respective risk factors for both exist. ...Read more

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Fatty liver NASH wilson's disease, tell me more?

Fatty liver NASH wilson's disease, tell me more?

Confusion: Clinically and under the microscope, wilson's (rare) can look treacherously like alcoholic liver disease or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (nash, very common). In fact, even weighing the copper in the liver can be misleading because the biopsy may be regenerative nodules. A urinary copper check is part of my preferred workup, and consider a genetic check. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (nash) or fatty liver?

NASH symptoms: None. There are the same symptoms of liver failure such as jaundice, itching , fluid retention, confusion, bleeding. Fatigue. This disease is very silent, only gives symptoms as the liver progressively fails. ...Read more

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What is chronic liver parenchymal disease with cirrhosis; varices and ascites?

What is chronic liver parenchymal disease with cirrhosis; varices and ascites?

This sounds serious: To translate, you have liver cell damage and scarring (cirrhosis), which caused abnormally elevated portal vein pressures which caused venous distention in esophagus (varices). You also developed fluid in abdominal cavity, because of the high portal vein pressure. This imaging study is showing advanced stage of liver disease. You must get a specialist to treat you. ...Read more

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What is nonalcoholic steatohepatitis?

What is nonalcoholic steatohepatitis?

Basically: fatty liver caused by elevated lipids. You need treatment because this condition can proceed to cirrhosis and eventual liver failure. ...Read more

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How does someone get non-alcoholic fatty liver disease?

How does someone get non-alcoholic fatty liver disease?

NAFLD: Fatty liver is found in patients who suffer from obesity, diabetes, and other disease processes associated with metabolic syndrome. Some drugs can cause fatty liver. ...Read more

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What is fatty liver disease?

What is fatty liver disease?

See below: Fatty liver is essentially the abnormal deposition of fat in the liver. It can lead to inflammation and ultimately cirrhosis. The causes include alcohol, non-alcoholic fatty liver and medications. Non-alcoholic fatty liver is the most common and is related to obesity, high triglycerides, diabetes and genetic predisposition. ...Read more

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What is the treatment of non alcholic fatty liver diseases?

What is the treatment of non alcholic fatty liver diseases?

Liver heals itself: There is no medication for liver diseases. For the dangerous and deadly fatty liver disease this is treated with a two pronged approach: weight loss and low carbohydrate diet combined with avoidance of all other liver toxins: Acetaminophen and alcohol. ...Read more

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Non alcoholic beer whilst having a fatty liver-safe?

NASH - BEER: Hi ~ Yes, NASH + non alcohol beer is completely OK and wont worsen NASH as long as you dont drink too much since it contains carbs. If you are OBESE please go on carbo reduced diet to reduce fatty infiltration in liver.thanks ...Read more

Dr. Gyongyi Szabo
29 doctors shared insights

Alcoholic Liver Disease (Definition)

Alcohol is absorbed from the intestines and broken down in the liver. Some of the byproducts are toxic to the liver and at high enough levels, can lead to alcoholic hepatitis. This is usually self limiting when consumption is low and sporadic and is reversible. When taken excessively and chronically, it can lead to scarring of the liver, and in some cases lead to ...Read more


Dr. Mark Pack
16 doctors shared insights

Paget Disease Of The Nipple (Definition)

Is a malignant condition that may have the appearance of eczema, with skin changes involving the nipple of the breast. The incidence is approximately around 3%. Most of them are also associated with underlying breast cancer. Biopsy should be done to confirm. Mammogram, sonogram and perhaps MRI breast should be done-depending on the case to ...Read more