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Doctor insights on: Addisons Disease And Sodium Potassium Levels

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Dr. David Geffner
262 Doctors shared insights

Addison's Disease (Definition)

Chronic adrenal insufficiency. You may consult this site for more information on this topic. Http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/diseases-conditions/addisons-disease/home/ovc-20155636 For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Drink enough water daily, so that your urine is mostly colorless. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any ...Read more


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Could a person have Addison's disease with a normal CBC? Normal sodium, potassium, and glucose within the general test. Symptoms of fatigue/dizziness.

Could a person have Addison's disease with a normal CBC? Normal sodium, potassium, and glucose within the general test. Symptoms of fatigue/dizziness.

Addisons disease: Why are you thinking this? There are special tests for addisons disease. You need to give mor symptoms. Having fatigue and dizziness can be from many possible reasons. Begin with a very good history. See doctor and start there ...Read more

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If you wanted to rule out addisons just as a guess for safety. Would a serum cortisol, potassium and sodium be ok?

Maybe: If you're sick enough to think you have Addison's, hopefully you're already had your serum potassium assay; it's neither sensitive nor specific. Serum sodium varies a lot and isn't helpful. There's a cutoff value for cortisol that the lab will share that rules out Addison's, but many people fall below and will require further study, such as an ACTH stimulation test. ...Read more

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Why does one have low cortisol and high potassium levels in addison's disease?

Why does one have low cortisol and high potassium levels in addison's disease?

See below: Addison's disease is a state of low cortisol or hypocortisolism. In addition to cortsiol, the adrenal galnd also produces a very important hormone called aldosterone. The latter is responsible for reabsorbing sodium from the urine in exchange for potassium. If such hormone is not produced in sufficient quantity (either isolated or in conjunction with cortisol), potassium levels go up. ...Read more

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Why do I crave salt excessively? I've read among other diagnosis that craving salt is a symptom of addisons disease?

Why do I crave salt excessively? I've read among other diagnosis that craving salt is a symptom of addisons disease?

Possibly: Although salt craving is a symptom of addisons disease, most people who crave salt do not have this disorder, as it is very rare. Major symptoms of addisons also include loss of appetite, nausea, weight loss, lightheadedness when standing due to low blood pressure, skin darkening. If addisons disease is suspected, the diagnosis should be confirmed by an endocrinologist before starting medication. ...Read more

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Ruling out addisons disease what other conditions would cause me to excessively crave salt? I get up in the middle of the night & eat salt by the tabl

Ruling out addisons disease what other conditions would cause me to excessively crave salt? I get up in the middle of the night & eat salt by the tabl

Not common: Sx of addison's disease can include: craving salt, muscle weakness, fatigue, weight loss, low blood pressure. Salt craving can also be seen in bartter syndrome and certain psychiatric conditions. Check w/your doctor for help as severe salt craving is obviously abnormal. ...Read more

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I am currently on hydrocortisone & fludrocortisone for addisons disease. When the dr runs a blood test for Adrenocorticotropic Hormone level & it comes back normal is that because I am on oral steroids?

I am currently on hydrocortisone & fludrocortisone for addisons disease. When the dr runs a blood test for Adrenocorticotropic Hormone level & it comes back normal is that because I am on oral steroids?

Yes: The pituitary gland usually governs how much cortisone should be produced to meet the body's needs via a hormone called ACTH. More ACTH is released to tell the adrenal to produce more when the cortisone level is low and vice versa. When the cortisone level is adequate, the body would produce only the normal amount of ACTH. ...Read more

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Why does blood bicarbonate (sodium bicarbonate) level decrease if you have addison's disease?

Why does blood bicarbonate (sodium bicarbonate) level decrease if you have addison's disease?

Loss of Aldosterone: Metabolic acidosis (increased h+ and blood acidity) due to decreased bicarbonate (sodium bicarbonate) level in addisonian crisis is due to loss of the hormone aldosterone because sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule is linked with acid/hydrogen ion (h+) secretion. Less aldosterone stimulation of the renal distal tubule leads to sodium wasting in urine and h+ retention in the serum, resulting in bicarbonate (sodium bicarbonate) drop. ...Read more

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My cortisol in blood is 4.50 at 12:00 noon. Sodium is 137 and potassium is 5.1.is it normal? Or does it shows adrenal insufficiency?

My cortisol in blood is 4.50 at 12:00 noon. Sodium is 137 and potassium is 5.1.is it normal? Or does it shows adrenal insufficiency?

No: When you check for adrenal insufficiency you need to do a Cortrysin stimulation test That test id done by taking a fasting cortisol then giving you an injection the testing the cortisol at 4pm then looking at the results somewhat complicated ...Read more

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Why do people with addison's disease have low cortisol and high potassium?

Why do people with addison's disease have low cortisol and high potassium?

Several reasons: Low cortisol is the definition of adrenal insufficiency. High k is due to a combination of aldosterone deficiency in true primary ai (addison's) and dehydration. ...Read more

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Why would someone with addison's disease have low cortisol and high potassium?

Addison's disease: Patients with addison's disease have a low cortisol level since the adrenal glands do not produce it. They have high potassium levels because their adrenal glands do not produce aldosterone, which helps the body get rid of potassium in the kidney. ...Read more

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So all of my issues with high white count, high platelets, high potassium, severe anemia, could that be addison's disease?

So all of my issues with high white count, high platelets, high potassium, severe anemia, could that be addison's disease?

Several causes: Probably better to see your doctor as there are several possibilities including infection, bleeding before thinking of addison's. ...Read more

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Can a teen have addisons disease?

Can a teen have addisons disease?

Yes absolutely.: Although rare, addison's does present in teens. If there is a family history of autoimmune diseases, this is even more likely. Addison's can be a life threatening illness, so if you have concerns, please speak to your doctor soon. Signs and symptoms can be non-specific and include fatigue and weakness, but what sets addison's apart is the accompanying skin changes and blood test abnormalities. ...Read more

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What does addisons disease do to a person?

What does addisons disease do to a person?

Weakness, low BP: In addison's disease, one's adrenal glands are not producing enough cortisone, aldosterone, & sex hormones. BP is very low; hr can be fast. Chronic nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea; extreme fatigue & weakness; salt craving; darkening of skin in some places, paleness in others -- the person can look patchy. With hormone replacement therapy, normal life is possible. Http://tinyurl. Com/4ytupea. ...Read more

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What are the demographics of people who have addisons disease?

Varies: The occurrence of addison disease is rare. The reported prevalence in countries where data are available is 39 cases per 1 million population in great britain and 60 cases per 1 million population in denmark. ...Read more

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Why is hemoglobin A1c high in addisons disease?

Why is hemoglobin A1c high in addisons disease?

Thanks for asking!: The risk of having type I diabetes increases in the presence of another autoimmune disease, such as addison's disease. ...Read more

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Can addisons disease be cured? Need expert opinions!

Can addisons disease be cured? Need expert opinions!

Nope: Hi. Addison's disease can be treated, but not cured, much like type 1 diabetes, hypothyroidism, hypopituitarism, etc. Don't forget to talk with your doc about stress doses of your glucocorticoid (probably hydrocortisone or prednisone), and to have an injectable glucocorticoid on hand in case you can't keep anything down by mouth, to buy you time to get to the ER. All the best. ...Read more

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Need a simple explaination for this. What does addisons disease do to a person?

Need a simple explaination for this. What does addisons disease do to a person?

Nothing simple here: Inability to make cortisol renders a person weak, sickly, often dark-complected, interferes with control of blood potassium and glucose, and puts them at risk for dying suddenly when stressed. Once diagnosed, it's managed easily enough but the person does well to sport a tag warning of addisonism so extra cortisol can be given in a medical crisis. Autoimmue form runs with other illnesses. ...Read more

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Is there a connection between addisons disease and diabetes?

Is there a connection between addisons disease and diabetes?

Connection: There is a condition called polyglandular syndrome consisting primarily of autoimmune thyroid, adrenal and type 1 diabetes. In general, whenever you have one autoimmune disease, you are at higher risk of developing another autoimmune disease. ...Read more

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Is addisons disease a genetic hereditary problem?

Is addisons disease a genetic hereditary problem?

Addisions is genetic: In 2012 the answer is usually yes. Tuberculosis caused dr. Addison to describe the condition. Now it is any failure of the adrenal glands. Today it does run in families where autoimmune diseases occur. (thyroid, diabetes, adrenal, celiac, etc). ...Read more

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Is smoking marijuana bad if you have addisons disease?

Is smoking marijuana bad if you have addisons disease?

Yes, Yes.: If you smoke majuana (unprescribed by md) that is bad. If you have addison's disease and smoke marijuana that is more bad. I wish you can decide to fight these 2 disorders and reclaim the healthy life you deserve. Get help for both problems. Life can be good. ...Read more

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I have addisons disease. They want me on prednisone of hydrocortisone. Which one has less negative side effects? Thanks

I have addisons disease. They want me on prednisone of hydrocortisone. Which one has less negative side effects? Thanks

Either should be OK: If the dose is adjusted properly, either hydrocortisone or prednisone can be used for Addison's disease, keeping in mind that prednisone is about 5 times as potent. Prednisone has the advantage of a longer half life so twice a day works well. For hydrocortisone, some people need to take it 3 times a day to avoid having symptoms of fatigue for part of the day. ...Read more

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What is it like to have addisons disease?

Many things: Hi. Addison's disease is primary adrenal failure, usually of autoimmune etiology. The patients feel fatigue & malaise, dizziness on standing, nausea, loss of appetite, weight loss, low BP, high pulse, darkening skin, low blood sodium, high blood potassium, hi ACTH & low cortisol. In the untreated state, any severe illness, infection, trauma, etc can be lethal. Treat with Cortef (hydrocortisone) & Florinef. ...Read more

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Do you know anything about addisons disease?

Yes: What you need to know, as an ordinary person, is that in the us it is usually due to autoimmunity, in the rest of the world it is often due to tuberculosis, it is rare, most people who think they have it are actually responding to life stress, it is easily ruled in or out with labs provided the practitioner knows what he/she is doing, and patients must take rx and carry a needle and information. ...Read more

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What is primary adrenal insufficiency (addisons disease)?

What is primary adrenal insufficiency (addisons disease)?

Adrenal cortex: The adrenal cortex makes lots of hormones. Very important are cortisol and aldosterone which help maintain life and salt balance. Addison's disease is caused by adrenal cortex damage rendering it unable to make these hormones anymore, mostly autoimmune cause in us. Patients often have a bronzed look. Hydrocortisone replacement is a lifesaving necessity. Fludrocortisone may also become necessary. ...Read more

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Can I still smoke marijuana if I have addisons disease?

Can I still smoke marijuana if I have addisons disease?

I suppose: And you can still shoot heroin too but why would you. ...Read more

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Do infertility and addisons disease usually go hand in hand?

Do infertility and addisons disease usually go hand in hand?

Links between both: Maybe, not always. Women with primary ovarian insufficiency (early menopause) are much more likely to develop addison's disease and need to be tested. The connection works the other way, with women with addison's disease having lower fertility than women the same age without addison's, but not all are infertile. 1 report of a man with addison's with low sperm, improved with treatment of addison's. ...Read more

Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
382 Doctors shared insights

Adrenal Insufficiency (Definition)

Adrenal insufficiency is either an absent or abnormally low production and/or secretion of hormones produced by the adrenal gland. Hormones produced by the adrenal glands include those involved with salt regulation, sugar metabolism, and sex hormones ...Read more


Dr. Madhu Kandarpa
1,327 Doctors shared insights

Potassium (Definition)

Potassium is an essential electrolyte, important in the functioning of many organs including the heart, kidneys, muscles, nerves, and digestive system. Deficiency can be caused by diseases such as kidney failure, vomiting, and diarrhea, or by ...Read more