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Doctor insights on: Ach Receptor Binging Ab

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Do ACh antibodies block or destroy ACh receptors?

Do ACh antibodies block or destroy ACh receptors?

Both in a way: ACh or acetylcholine antibodies can be both blocking and binding. They are nearly specific for Myasthenia Gravis. Binding essentially destroys the function. Acetylcholine is essential for nerve muscle and nerve impulse transmission. ...Read more

Receptor (Definition)

An organ, cell or molecule that accepts an outside signal and causes an internal change. Eyes receive light, touch receptors send messages to the brain when stimulated by pressure and estrogen receptors bind Estradiol causing responses of normal breast, ovary and uterus cells to rising and falling levels of the female steroid hormones. Most of the time "receptor" refers to one ...Read more


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Is a rapid heartbeat caused by blocked ach receptors dangerous?

Is a rapid heartbeat caused by blocked ach receptors dangerous?

Depends: Certain drugs and venoms cause reversible or irreversible blockade of acetylcholine receptors. Some cause rapid heart rate. If you're receiving such a drug, it's under the supervision of a physician, so put your trust in that person. Whether the increased heart rate is injurious depends on the specifics of your health history and condition. ...Read more

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I failed my qsart test what is the next step and what could this mean? Acetylcholine receptor ab 0.00 nmol/l <=0.02 12/12/2012 and my antibody norma

I failed my qsart test what is the next step and what could this mean?	Acetylcholine receptor ab	0.00	nmol/l	<=0.02	12/12/2012
and my antibody norma

QSART: Quantitative sudomotor autonomic reflex testing (qsart) is used to diagnose:
painful small fiber neuropathy when nerve conduction test results are normal; disturbances of the autonomic nervous system, which controls the sweat glands, heart, gastrointestinal tract, other organs, and blood pressure; complex regional pain syndrome or reflex sympathetic dystrophy.
A discussion with ur neurologist next. ...Read more

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I read that there are nmda-like receptors in the epidermis. Would the anti-nmda ab test show antibodies to receptors in skin?

I read that there are nmda-like receptors in the epidermis.  Would the anti-nmda ab test show antibodies to receptors in skin?

No : Classically the nmda receptors are in the nervous system and associated with neurologic disease. There are tiny nerve fibers in the skin that have the receptor, not the skin itself, what importance this has in human disease is unknown, but some medical scientists think drugs which act on them may be useful in pain control some day. ...Read more

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Tested for acetylcholine receptor ab panel; both binding and blocking were 0, but modulating came back at 10. Does this mean I have myasthenia gravis?

Tested for acetylcholine receptor ab panel; both binding and blocking were 0, but modulating came back at 10. Does this mean I have myasthenia gravis?

AchRAntibodies: Binding antibodies are the most sensitive--they are positive in over 80% of ms patients. Blocking antibodies are positive in about half. Modulating antibodies alone don't support the diagnosis and have a lot oof false positives. In summary the achreceptor antibody panel does not suggest that ou have ms>. ...Read more

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I just got my thyroid test and noticed my thyroglobulin Ab <20 and Peroxidase =201. TSH receptor antibody 1.6 . What does that signify??

I just got my thyroid test and noticed my thyroglobulin Ab <20 and Peroxidase =201. TSH receptor antibody 1.6 . What does that signify??

See your physician: You don't tell us what your thyroid function tests showed. You have autoantibodies — antibodies that our immune system produces against our own thyroid gland. You probably have thyroid disease and see your current physician first. You may have to see an endocrinologist, a physician who specializes in the diseases of the endocrine system. ...Read more

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What is receptor expression?

What is receptor expression?

Surface receptors: Each cell has a membrane surface with numerous proteins that can interact with other signals- proteins or small molecules like hormones- producing reactions within the cell. The nucleus and other parts of the cell control what receptors are present on the surface and how many. This is the biologic machinery and communication network of all biologic systems. ...Read more

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What is the prevalent cell receptor in our brains?

What is the prevalent cell receptor in our brains?

Glutamine: This is the most common neurotransmitter in the brain, but there are hundreds of types of receptor in the brain overall, and it would be a mistake to say any is the most important. ...Read more

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What are the receptors located in the epidermis called?

What are the receptors located in the epidermis called?

Many types: Which kind are you asking about? There are a variety of sensory, chemical and immune receptors. ...Read more

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Are brca hormone receptors?

Are brca hormone receptors?

No: Brca genes are important in repairing damaged dna. Mutations in these genes allow defective dna to replicate and turn the cells with defective dna into turmors. ...Read more

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What is a hormone receptor for?

What is a hormone receptor for?

For an effect: The receptor is the area on the surface of a cell to which a hormone binds in order for the hormone to have an effect on the cell. For example, estrogen binds to its receptor on or in the cell and then the cell changes its behavior in response to the estrogen. Most hormones won't do anything unless they first bind to a cell receptor. ...Read more

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What do h2 receptors in the heart do?

What do h2 receptors in the heart do?

H2 receptors: This is an excellent question. After reviewing the literature, I can say that I don't think we really know. There are various things possible that they do but a solid study with consistent results other than in rats or pigs, I couldn't find. ...Read more

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What type of cancer has her2 receptors?

What type of cancer has her2 receptors?

Breast Cancer: Overexpression of the her2/neu receptor is found in app. 25% of breast cancer patients and is associated with more aggressive cancers. This overexpression may also be found in patients with ovarian-, stomach-, and uterine cancer. Herceptin (trastuzumab) is a drug used to target these cancer cells and suppress their growth. ...Read more

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Is stanozolol a beta receptor antagonist?

Is stanozolol a beta receptor antagonist?

Stanozolol: Stanozolol is a synthetic anabolic steroid derived from testosterone.

It is banned from use in athletes but has a role in some medical conditions.

Please look up stanozolol in Wikipedia on the internet. ...Read more

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Where are the muscarinic and nicotinic receptors?

See below: Acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter, acts on two different types of receptors to produce different effects. You may consult this site for more information in this topic:
http://pharmacologycorner.com/acetylcholine-receptors-muscarinic-and-nicotinic/ ...Read more

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Opioid receptor subtypes, can you tell me about this?

Opioid receptor subtypes, can you tell me about this?

Evolving science: When I was in med school, specific receptors were just being discovered, and they knew that Mu receptors were the main pain receptor in the brain, while kappa receptors were in the nerve endings, nerves and spinal cord. There are also delta, epsilon and sigma receptors that function to help peristalsis in the bowel, and are involved in cough and in mood. It is now known there are subreceptors too. ...Read more

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What are the main beta receptors blocked by beta blockers?

What are the main beta receptors blocked by beta blockers?

Depends on drug: The receptors we are generally attempting to block with these medications are the beta-1 receptors in the heart. Medications such as metoprolol and atenolol work specifically on this receptor. There are also nonselective beta blockers such as labetalol, Propranolol and Carvedilol which work on this receptor as well as the beta-2 receptor. Carvedilol, in particular, also affects the alpha-1 recept. ...Read more

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Is there an androgen receptor blocker that only bind to pituitary?

Is there an androgen receptor blocker that only bind to pituitary?

No: There are ARs found all over the body. It's a type of nuclear receptor, that is, it binds to T or DHT in the cytoplasm and then translocates into the nucleus. ARB's like casodex will block AR's wherever they are. Enzalutamide has a greater affinity, prevents translocation & binding to DNA. You may be talking about LHRH agonists or antagonist for prostate cancer. Firmagon (degarelix) blocks in the pituitary. ...Read more

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Could taking one Suboxone pill ruin your opiate receptors at all?

Opiopid receptor: Suboxone, just like other opiates, can cause a change in opiate receptor physiology. Most opiates do this at the mu receptor whereas Suboxone also causes changes at the kappa opioid receptor. The change does not seem to be permanent and things can return to normal after a period of drug free interval which can vary between individuals. ...Read more

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Explain what happens when the antigen binds with t cell receptor?

Explain what happens when the antigen binds with t cell receptor?

T cell activation: In most cases, antigen must be "shown" to the t cell receptor along with a protein called mhc. If the cell with the antigen/mhc also has the proper co-stimulatory proteins, the t cell is activated (like needing 2 keys to fire a missle). If the extra proteins are not present, the t cell may cease to function. If the t cell was already activated, it can produce chemicals and/or kill the other cell. ...Read more

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Does Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine) permanently destroy neuron receptors?

Does Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine) permanently destroy neuron receptors?

No: To my knowledge, there are no reports of Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine) causing permanent damage to nerve cells. If you are concerned about an adverse reaction, talk to the doctor who prescribed. ...Read more

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What are acetylcholine receptor antagonists and what are they used for?

What are acetylcholine receptor antagonists and what are they used for?

Neuromusculat ransmi: Acetylcholine is an import neuromuscular transmitter that controls muscle functions and bodily and organ movements inside. So using antagonists can block these processes and cause trouble especially with the function of our smooth muscles of the bowel(constipation)bladder(urine retention) and eyes(blurred vision). ...Read more

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Will a GABA antagonist binded to the GABA receptors sites ever unbind?

Yes.: Receptors are bound, unbound and replaced all the time. ...Read more

Dr. Robert Skversky
551 doctors shared insights

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