Top
40
Doctor insights on: Acetylcholinesterase

Share
1

1
What is acetylcholinesterase inhibitor?

What is acetylcholinesterase inhibitor?

Blocks the enzyme: Mutliple drugs are available to block the effects of this enzyme which breaks down acetylcholine - essential for muscle movement along with many other functions. Used for myasthenia gravis, alzheimers, glaucoma, etc. ...Read more

2

2
What is acetylcholinesterase inhibitor?

Blocks the enzyme: Mutliple drugs are available to block the effects of this enzyme which breaks down acetylcholine - essential for muscle movement along with many other functions. Used for myasthenia gravis, alzheimers, glaucoma, etc. ...Read more

3

3
What compounds increase acetylcholinesterase activity?

Why do you ask?: Or ... "What are Organophosphates?" if you're playing Jeopardy. ...Read more

4

4
A drug to reduce the activity of acetylcholinesterase.?

A drug to reduce the activity of acetylcholinesterase.?

Enzyme Blocker: Mutliple drugs are available to block the effects of this enzyme which breaks down acetylcholine - essential for muscle movement along with many other functions. Used for myasthenia gravis, alzheimers, glaucoma, etc. Drugs such as edrophonium, neostigmine , physostigmine, pyridostigmine, etc. ...Read more

6

6
Can exelon, (rivastigmine) aricept, or, namenda treat Lewy body dementia?

Can exelon, (rivastigmine) aricept, or, namenda treat Lewy body dementia?

No: No treatment is yet available for lewy body dementia. However, these might help alleviate some symptoms temporarily. ...Read more

7

7
Is cdp choline, magnesium, acetyl L-carnitine and lipoic acid MAO inhibitors?

Is cdp choline, magnesium, acetyl L-carnitine and lipoic acid MAO inhibitors?

NO: In general, MAO inhibitors refer to specific prescription antidepressant drugs & are highly regulated. Many foods & herbs have mild MAO inhibiting actions, such as carrots, chocolate, coffee, ginger, grape & onions,but these effects are not clinically significant & they don't need to be avoided if on a med that interacts with MAO inhibitors: http://www.botanical-online.com/english/vegetalmaois.htm ...Read more

9

9
What are NMDA receptors?

What are NMDA receptors?

See below: Please consult this site for information : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK5284/ ...Read more

10

10
Glutamine excitatory or inhbitory?

Glutamine excitatory or inhbitory?

Both, indirectly: Glutamine is a major precursor of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter, & of gaba (gamma-aminobutyric acid), the most potent inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian brains. ...Read more

11

11
Myasthenia gravis and dopamine levels?

Myasthenia gravis and dopamine levels?

? what is the questi: Myastenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease, the body make antibodies which can interrupt muscular function. Does not directly involve dopamine. Dopamine is a neuromuscular transmitter which can be decreased in parkinson's disease. ...Read more

12

12
What are neuron inhibitors? Examples?

What are neuron inhibitors? Examples?

Come again?: Are you asking about endogenous substances like inhibitory neurotransmitters or exogenous substances (drugs)? Physicians and neuroscientists don't generally think in the terms in which you've framed your question. Put another way, your question is too vague. Try reposting it with a more specific (and longer) description of what question you're trying to get answered. ...Read more

13

13
Which alzheimer's drug is most effective: Aricept or namenda (memantine)?

Which alzheimer's drug is most effective: Aricept or namenda (memantine)?

Early vs later stage: Both relieve symptoms of the disease & focus on neurotransmitters key to memory and learning. Aricept focuses on acetycholine in an attempt to slow its loss because of alzheimer's. Namenda (memantine) focuses on glutamate, blocking the excess produced as a part of the disease. Namenda (memantine) is better suited to moderate to advanced stages of alzheimer's, while Aricept is for early onset through advanced stages. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
14

14
What is the name of the disease when the acetylcholinesterase does not work?

What is the name of the disease when the acetylcholinesterase does not work?

Pseudochol deficient: Pseudocholinesterase deficiency is an inherited enzyme abnormality that results in abnormally slow breakdown of drugs such as succinylcholine (typically used during anesthesia for surgery). The drug thus takes lower to break down and causes a longer than expected effect - sometimes lasting hours as opposed to minutes. ...Read more

15

15
How do cholinesterase inhibitors affect tau proteins and beta amyloid that form in Alzheimer's disease?

How do cholinesterase inhibitors affect tau proteins and beta amyloid that form in Alzheimer's disease?

They don't: The cholinesterase inhibitor group of drugs are not disease modifying agents, and merely improve synaptic connections by preserving the lower levels of acetylcholine in the brain. However, there is no direct or indirect effect on the tau or amyloid presence. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
17

17
What antidepressant medications selectively block neurotransmitters?

What antidepressant medications selectively block neurotransmitters?

Most newer ones: Most of the newer antidepressant medications affect specific neurotransmitters. Each does it slightly differently, accounting for the different response rates amongst them. The SSRI's primarily increase serotonin, the SNRI's both serotonin and norepinephrine, and buproprion mostly norepinephrine alone, and Brintellix affects many of them in different ways and in different places in the brain. ...Read more

18

18
What are GABA antagonists that lead to gaba-a receptor up-regulation?

Not safe: GABA antagonists are not routinely prescribed for GABA A receptor upregulation. The main one flumazenil (clonazepam) is used for overdoses from benzodiazepines in an ER setting. It may cause withdrawal seizures. Your best bet is to detox and enter a drug tx program for alcohol or sedative-hypnotic dependence issues. ...Read more

19

19
Can autoantibodies against glutamine synthetase and/or glutamate dehydrogenase cause glutamate metabolism disorders?

Can autoantibodies against glutamine synthetase and/or glutamate dehydrogenase cause glutamate metabolism disorders?

Still searching: Glutamine synthase is part of the glutamine synthetase family. Ammonia incorporation in animals occurs through the actions of glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthase. Glutamate plays the central role in mammalian nitrogen flow, serving as both a nitrogen donor and nitrogen acceptor. I am unble to find references in my search so far as to autoantibodies to these but see comment. ...Read more

20

20
Does triavil block dopamine receptors in the central nervous system?

Does triavil block dopamine receptors in the central nervous system?

Yes: Triavil is an old medicine that is not often used anymore. It's a combination of Amitriptyline and perphenazine. The latter is a neuroleptic (antipsychotic) medication that mainly acts by blocking Dopamine receptors in the brain. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
21

21
Is histamine excitatory or inhibitory?

Is histamine excitatory or inhibitory?

Excitatory: Histamine is actually classified as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain responsible for the sleep wake cycle. Too much of it can keep you awake. That is why it is used in many commercial sleep aides seen with the letters "pm" attached to some kind of pain killer. A common side-effect of a histamine blocker like Diphenhydramine (benadryl) is drowsiness. ...Read more

22

22
Can autoantibodies against glutamate receptors cause glutamate metabolism disorders?

Can autoantibodies against glutamate receptors cause glutamate metabolism disorders?

Yes. Great Question!: The Amino Acid glutamate plays a central role in nitrogen metabolism & participates in multiple biochemical pathways. Disease examples: autoantibodies to the glutamate receptor kill neurons via activation of the receptor ion channel. Anti-nmda receptor encephalitis is a treatment-responsive inflammatory encephalopathic autoimmune disease associated with anti-nmda receptor antibodies. ...Read more

23

23
Which is most effective in slowing down Alzheimer's: aricept, exelon, (rivastigmine) or reminyl?

Which is most effective in slowing down Alzheimer's: aricept, exelon, (rivastigmine) or reminyl?

No head2head study: So far, there are no head-to-head studies demonstrating that one medication is better than the other/rest. Aricept (donepezil), Exelon (rivastigmine) & Razadyne (nee Reminyl aka galantamine) are all acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI). Namenda (memantine) is an NMDA receptor antagonist which is often used in conjunction w/one of these AChEI to slow down progression of Alzheimer's disease. ...Read more

24

24
What are normal results for amniotic acetylcholinesterase?

What are normal results for amniotic acetylcholinesterase?

Negative.: Acetylcholinesterase should not be detectable in the normal amniotic fluid. Its presence is pathognomonic of open neural tube defects and/or other open lesions of the fetus with exposure of neural elements such as teratomas and amniotic band sequences. ...Read more

25

25
What compounds increase acetylcholinesterase activity?

Why do you ask?: Or ... "What are Organophosphates?" if you're playing Jeopardy. ...Read more

26

26
A drug to reduce the activity of acetylcholinesterase.?

Enzyme Blocker: Mutliple drugs are available to block the effects of this enzyme which breaks down acetylcholine - essential for muscle movement along with many other functions. Used for myasthenia gravis, alzheimers, glaucoma, etc. Drugs such as edrophonium, neostigmine , physostigmine, pyridostigmine, etc. ...Read more

27

27
What is the name of the disease when the acetylcholinesterase does not work?

Pseudochol deficient: Pseudocholinesterase deficiency is an inherited enzyme abnormality that results in abnormally slow breakdown of drugs such as succinylcholine (typically used during anesthesia for surgery). The drug thus takes lower to break down and causes a longer than expected effect - sometimes lasting hours as opposed to minutes. ...Read more

29

29
Please help! what is the name of the disease when the acetylcholinesterase does not function?

Please help! what is the name of the disease when the acetylcholinesterase does not function?

Here are some: Perhaps you are thinking of Myasthenia Gravis, where the acetylcholine fails due to immune damage of the neuromuscular junction, but botulism and black widow spider bites also affect acetylcholine transmission, and this chemical drops in Alzheimer's and Parkinsonian dementias. ...Read more

30

30
What are normal results for amniotic acetylcholinesterase?

Negative.: Acetylcholinesterase should not be detectable in the normal amniotic fluid. Its presence is pathognomonic of open neural tube defects and/or other open lesions of the fetus with exposure of neural elements such as teratomas and amniotic band sequences. ...Read more

31

31
Do you know if acetylcholinesterase is a multi-substrate enzyme?

Do you know if acetylcholinesterase is a multi-substrate enzyme?

Enzymolology: That's an interesting question. Many enzymes are capable of processing more than one substrate, but they are not very efficient with multiple substrates. A good example is alcohol dehydrogenase. Acetylcholinesterase is essentially a "one-substrate" enzyme based on its biochemical properties. ...Read more

32

32
How does huperzine differ from other acetylcholinesterase inhibitors?

How does huperzine differ from other acetylcholinesterase inhibitors?

Drug out of China: Huperzine a might have some benefit similar to drugs such as donepezil, rivastigmine, or galantamine, (galantamine hydrobromide) as it too, is a cholinesterase inhibitor. Has received hype in the alternative literature, due to lack of branding and commercial ownership, but it is unlikely to be any better than the above prescription meds. Do not waste money pursuing the "chinese aricept". ...Read more

33

33
What is acetylcholinesterase inhibitor?

Blocks the enzyme: Mutliple drugs are available to block the effects of this enzyme which breaks down acetylcholine - essential for muscle movement along with many other functions. Used for myasthenia gravis, alzheimers, glaucoma, etc. ...Read more

34

34
If acetylcholinesterase is not present to remove acetylcholine, the muscle is in contraction. What is the name of the disorder/disease?

If acetylcholinesterase is not present to remove acetylcholine, the muscle is in contraction. What is the name of the disorder/disease?

Acetylcholinesterase: is always present. Acetylcholine doesn't just cause muscle contraction; it's essential in the CNS as well. You can't have absence in one place & presence in the other. Our bodies don't work that way. An absence of acetylcholinesterase is not compatible with life. ...Read more

35

35
Can a person take ssri /cipralex/ and acetylcholinesterase inhibitor /donepezil/ at the same time?

Can a person take ssri /cipralex/ and acetylcholinesterase inhibitor /donepezil/ at the same time?

Drug Interaction: Checker showed possible mild, clinically insigficant interaction potential. Actual possible sxs- not listed. Answer is yes. ...Read more

37

37
The absence or inhibition of acetycholinesterase at a synapse would lead to what?

The absence or inhibition of acetycholinesterase at a synapse would lead to what?

The most common...: cause of of this is an autoimmune disease called myasthenia gravis. Antibodies are formed that block the acetylcholine from making it across the synapse to bind on its receptors. ...Read more

39

39
Am I dying?

Am I dying?

We all are: A 3-word question with no details... well, life is short on Earth, regardless of whether a person lives 3 days, 3000 days, or 30,000 days. It is not length of one's life that matters, but the quality of the life lived. The goal is not to live a long life, but to live a good life. Even if a person makes it all the way to age 82, that's only 30,000 days. ...Read more

40

40
I have cold?

I have cold?

Symptoms?: The most common symptoms of a cold are sneezing, running nose, congestion and scratchy throat. Additional symptoms can be coughing, headaches, mucus dripping down the back of the throat, loss of appetite and fever (in children). ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer