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Doctor insights on: Abnormal Serum Laboratory Findings Common To Acute Renal Failure

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What is a common predisposing factor for pre-renal acute renal failure post-operatively?

What is a common predisposing factor for pre-renal acute renal failure post-operatively?

Surgery: Blood loss, inadequate volume resuscitation, excess diuretics, poor PO in take. Any thing that removes fluid from the body or reduces renal blood flow, such as low cardiac output. ...Read more

Dr. Fred McCurdy
98 doctors shared insights

Acute Kidney Failure (Definition)

An abrupt loss of renal function as determined (usually) by a rise in the serum creatinine. Definitions vary, a rise in creatinine of as little as 0.2mg/dl in a smaller person could be significant. There is no consistent description. It could be asymptomatic or the patient plagued with edema, lack of urine, sob, protein and or blood in the urine. Pain and ...Read more


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Can drinking water reverse acute renal failure?

Acute renal failure: It depends on the cause of the acute renal failure. If it is due to volume depletion/dehydration, then yes, fluids (either oral or iv), can often help reverse acute renal failure. However, often medications contribute to acute injury and may need to be stopped or adjusted. ...Read more

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How effective is a ureteric stent for treating acute renal failure?

How effective is a ureteric stent for treating acute renal failure?

Depends: If the cause of renal failure is due to ureteral obstruction then very effective! The key is to address the obstruction ASAP in order to avoid any permanent damage to the kidneys. Important to monitor for post obstructive diuresis marked excessive urination after relief of obstruction. But, post-obstructive diuresis/natriuresis are good prognostic indicators of renal function recovery. ...Read more

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How effective is furosemide (Lasix) for treating acute renal failure?

How effective is furosemide (Lasix) for treating acute renal failure?

Lasix (furosemide) and ARF: It really depends upon the cause for ARF. Lasix (furosemide) is however, still the mainstay of therapy in re-establishing urine flow during the recovery phase from an acute renal injury. ...Read more

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Why is a patient with acute renal failure at a higher risk for infection?

ARF and infection: Acute renal failure (ARF) has a frequently reported mortality in 20-80% of the patients. Infection, as a cause or a complication of the syndrome, is a risk factor which adversely determines its outcome. In a study in 2009, infection occurred in four fifths of critically ill patients with ARF treated with dialysis and was in an unadjusted analysis associated with longer los and higher mortality. ...Read more

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What is the difference between acute renal failure and acute tubular necrosis?

Here are some...: Acute renal failure is a general term denoting kidneys not able to good enough to manage water and electrolytes due to acute conditions such as shocks from various reasons, and acute tubular necrosis denotes what can be seen in kidney tissue under microscopic exam if biopsy is done, but not necessary for almost all cases. Clinically, they all tell us kidneys not working enough from acute causes. ...Read more

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How are loop duretics used for acute renal failure and CHF though ther are contraindicaticated in borderline RF and CHF ?

Medicine vs. poison: There's a saying in healthcare: "medicines & poisons r the same chemicals given with different intent". If u r volume overloaded in acute renal failure or CHF, then u need volume reduction. The easiest & fastest way is diuretics, which "force" the kidney to get rid of water, tho side effects can occur (so u have to b monitored). If there is no volume overload in renal failure, skip the side effect ...Read more

Dr. Tarek Naguib
587 doctors shared insights

Kidney Failure (Definition)

The kidneys do several tasks. Dialysis is necessary when one or more of the following occur, that can't be remedied or palliated with medications: 1. Insufficient clearance of daily toxins in food and metabolic waste 2. Insufficient clearance of excess water 3. Dangerous electrolyte imbalance, ...Read more


Dr. Jack Rubin
81 doctors shared insights

Acute Renal Failure (Definition)

Acute renal failure, also known as acute kidney failure, occurs when your body is unable to clear out the products of metabolism that are normally filtered and excreted by your kidneys. Accute renal failure can be caused by the obstruction of urine flow, infection, severe metabolic ...Read more