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Doctor insights on: Periodontitis

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Dr. James Wright
632 Doctors shared insights

Periodontitis (Overview)

Periodontitis is a general term for an inflammatory gum disease that has caused some degree of irreversible hard and soft tissue damage. While most treatments will put the disease into remission with rigorous patient home care and there are even some new therapies that can repair some of the damage, it is a major cause of tooth lose! Best to avoid the altogether with regular dental care & homecare


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What is periodontitis?

What is periodontitis?

Disease of gums: It is a disease of the gums primarily caused by a combination of excess bad bacteria, and it's interaction with your immune system. It is often the result of inadequate oral hygiene, and can destroy the fibers that hold your teeth in. It is quite treatable if caught at an early state. Go see your dentist for treatment. ...Read more

Dr. James Wright
632 Doctors shared insights

Periodontitis (Overview)

Periodontitis is a general term for an inflammatory gum disease that has caused some degree of irreversible hard and soft tissue damage. While most treatments will put the disease into remission with rigorous patient home care and there are even some new therapies that can repair some of the damage, it is a major cause of tooth lose! Best to avoid the altogether with regular dental care & homecare


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How does periodontitis differ from gingivitis? How long does it take to cure them?

How does periodontitis differ from gingivitis? How long does it take to cure them?

Severity: Gingivitis is early easily reversible inflammation/infection. Periodontitis is more advanced/severe/destructive, and is more complex to treat. Best advice, see a Periodontist, a gum/bone specialist, for the highest quality, most efficient, treatment available. ...Read more

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Treating Gingivitis (Checklist)

Get additional cleanings if necessary
Once
Consider an electric toothbrush
Once
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I have all the symptoms of periodontitis, but myhygienist says nothing is wrong? Should I still get myself checked?

I have all the symptoms of periodontitis, but myhygienist says nothing is wrong? Should I still get myself checked?

Diagnosis: There are symptoms, and signs. Symptoms are what you the patient experience and signs of disease are what the doctor observes. In a situation like this, the hygienist may not be recognizing the signs. We recommend you contact a board certified periodontist and request a comprehensive periodontal evaluation. Periodontitis is best treated early. ...Read more

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I was diagnosed with periodontitis. I don't want to do surgery so are there any other options?

I was diagnosed with periodontitis. I don't want to do surgery so are there any other options?

Keep teeth?: There are different kinds of gum surgery. There is also laser surgery (lanap).
The real question is do you want to keep your teeth? The correct treatment is based on the severity of the disease. Non-surgical therapy has its limits. A famous quote is...You only have to treat the teeth you want to keep. ...Read more

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What are the tests for periodontitis?

What are the tests for periodontitis?

Thorough exam: You will need to have a thorough clinical examination with the appropriate x-rays. The clinical exam will likely include probing along each side your teeth to help determine if there is a periodontal problem. The x-rays are an adjunct to help determine the presence of bone loss.

Some offices may have you submit saliva for analysis as well as maintain a food intake diary as part of your data. ...Read more

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Do I have a good prognosis after being diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis? I've 25, and have just recently been diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis. I know I haven't taken good care of my teeth, but would like to turn that around now. How likely

Do I have a good prognosis after being diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis? I've 25, and have just recently been diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis. I know I haven't taken good care of my teeth, but would like to turn that around now. How likely

Yes: Aggressive periodontitis has a lot to do with a very nasty bacteria with the initials a.A. It may be localized to incisor and molar teeth or generalized to the whole mouth. These are the two types.

Eradication of the bacteria and repair of the damage, as well as regular maintenance are critical. Laser therapy has been very effective on eradicating this particular bacteria.

Warm regards, drc. ...Read more

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Anything you can do about the bone loss caused by periodontitis?

Anything you can do about the bone loss caused by periodontitis?

Yes: A thorough clinical dental examination with the appropriate x-rays is the first step. Depending on the severity of the periodontal problem, whether it is a generalized problem affecting multiple teeth or an isolated problem such as one tooth will determine what treatment can be offered.

Treatment can range from maintaining the present bone level to more complicated procedures such as grafts. ...Read more

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Is there toothpaste that helps treat periodontitis?

Is there toothpaste that helps treat periodontitis?

Wishful thinking: Perio disease is the result of acid from the bacteria in your mouth destroying the bone around your teeth. The most destructive bacteria are anaerobic (live with out oxygen). There is not a mouthwash made that can get to those bacteria. Same goes for toothpaste. Remove the plaque, and the acid goes with it. Bone never grows back. Treatment is maintaining your bone level with great cleaning ...Read more

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What can I do to treat mild periodontitis?

SRP: Scaling and root planing is usually appropriate to treat mild periodontiis. ...Read more

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How is chronic periodontitis treated?

How is chronic periodontitis treated?

Chronic TLC: While there are many different treatments for periodontal disease, they all involve regular dental visits. Treatment could include deep cleanings, a change in oral hygiene, surgery, antibiotics and other care. Your dentist or periodontist will direct you as to which options are best for your oral health. ...Read more

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Is gingivectomy always necessary for treating periodontitis? My dentist recommends gingivectomy for my periodontitis, but I'm afraid of the pain involved. Are there alternative treatments? .

Not Always!: The fact is, gingivectomy is not a commonly used treatment for periodontitis. Depending on why you have excess gingival tissue, there may be alternative treatments! Scaling and root planing and lanap or conventional surgery are other options. ...Read more

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What are some treatment options for periodontitis?

Depends: It depends on what stage your periodontitis is diagnosed (mild, moderate or severe) and what kind of osseous defect around the tooth (vertical or horizontal).
Scaling/root planing with or without local antibiotic delivery is effective for mild-moderate periodontitis. Osseous surgery or regenerative procedures using bonegraft, membrane or emdogain is effective for moderate-severe periodontitis. ...Read more

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How do I get rid of the small gaps between your teeth after periodontitis?

Restorations: Continued treatment of the gums to try and fill in the gaps is usually not predictable. Your best option is to see your restorative dds. With bonding or veneers, the gaps can disappear. ...Read more

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I have periodontitis. Everytime I eat, the food gets collected like a lump beneath the teeth, on the left side. It happens only on the left side. Is it dangerous?

I have periodontitis. Everytime I eat, the food gets collected like a lump beneath the teeth, on the left side. It happens only on the left side. Is it dangerous?

Cure is difficult: Control is really what you want and need to do.

Your dentist should evaluate and determine the best course of action.

Periodontal disease is a bacterial infection that, for best results, needs to be controlled on a daily basis.

I have successfully used perioprotect (non-surgical periodontal therapy) for mild to moderate periodontal treatment.

For information: http://perioprotect. Com. ...Read more

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When was juvenile periodontitis discovered and by whom?

When was juvenile periodontitis discovered and by whom?

Dentist: See a dentist. ... Juvenile periodontal disease, gum disease, is the early onset of oral disease and can be a precursor to other disease. Children need to be protected against gum disease and the loss of teeth by beginning proper oral care as infants. ...Read more

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What are methods used to prevent further bone loss due to periodontitis?

What are methods used to prevent further bone loss due to periodontitis?

Control perio: Periodontal disease is incurable, but treatable and maintainable. You must be diligent about following treatment protocols and maintenance schedules, and home care instructions. The key is keeping the bacterial count down by proper oral hygiene and professional periodontal treatment at your dentist's or periodontist's office. ...Read more

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What is periodontitis?

Disease of gums: It is a disease of the gums primarily caused by a combination of excess bad bacteria, and it's interaction with your immune system. It is often the result of inadequate oral hygiene, and can destroy the fibers that hold your teeth in. It is quite treatable if caught at an early state. Go see your dentist for treatment. ...Read more

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What are the tests for periodontitis?

Thorough exam: You will need to have a thorough clinical examination with the appropriate x-rays. The clinical exam will likely include probing along each side your teeth to help determine if there is a periodontal problem. The x-rays are an adjunct to help determine the presence of bone loss.

Some offices may have you submit saliva for analysis as well as maintain a food intake diary as part of your data. ...Read more

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Could I do something about periodontitis?

Could I do something about periodontitis?

Floss! Floss! Floss!: Attempt to correct periodontal issues by flossing daily. Skipping days is like not flossing at all! Don't floss to remove food, floss to clean the side walls of each tooth. If you see bleeding, then you probably need to observe how much of the tooth surface you are actually wiping clean. Toothbrushing is way overrated. If it worked you wouldn't have gum disease! have a dentist monitor efforts. ...Read more

Dr. Arnold Malerman
504 Doctors shared insights

Gingivitis (Definition)

A form of gum disease ...Read more