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Doctor insights on: Neuropraxia

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Dr. Sam Markzar
784 Doctors shared insights

Neuropraxia (Overview)

Neuropraxia is defined as a temporary loss of function of the nerve. Some nerves are purely sensory while others carry both sensory and motor fibers. Traumatic contusion injuries to nerves or nerve compressions can cause Neuropraxia. Sensory nerves like sural nerve in the leg or mixed sensory and motor nerves like the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm & hand are commonly affected nerves.


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Can emg ncs tell the difference between neuropraxia and axonometesis, can it diagnose how long the nerve will take to fully recover?

Can emg ncs tell the difference between neuropraxia and axonometesis, can it diagnose how long the nerve will take to fully recover?

Yes and no: Yes am EMG /ncs is used to differentiate neuropraxia and axonotmesis but the test itself cannot tell how long a lesion will take to recover. The physician performing the test can give the person an idea of how long an injury will take to heal and whether it is likely to heal based on the test results. ...Read more

Dr. Sam Markzar
784 Doctors shared insights

Neuropraxia (Overview)

Neuropraxia is defined as a temporary loss of function of the nerve. Some nerves are purely sensory while others carry both sensory and motor fibers. Traumatic contusion injuries to nerves or nerve compressions can cause Neuropraxia. Sensory nerves like sural nerve in the leg or mixed sensory and motor nerves like the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm & hand are commonly affected nerves.


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What are the tests for neuropraxia?

What are the tests for neuropraxia?

Two tests: Manual muscle strength testing and dynamometry. Emg, nerve excitability test and history and physical exam. ...Read more

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I can feel the pain from nerve damage run down my head or wherever it is at the moment. Is this pain treatable and what damage is this causing?

I can feel the pain from nerve damage run down my head or wherever it is at the moment. Is this pain treatable and what damage is this causing?

Seecondary Headache: Your question is too general, however in your case the most important is to rule out secondary type of headache. These headaches are symptomatic of an underlying cause: head trauma, headache with vascular disorders or without vascular disorders (ex. High CSF pressure) or headaches with non-cephalic infection like viral, bacterial or other. My recommendation is to see headache neurologist. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for neuropraxia?

What is the treatment for neuropraxia?

See below: Neuropraxia is a description of a type of nerve injury in which the outer covering of the nerve called myelin is damaged which causes a delay in nerve transmission. Many of the more common nerve conditions like carpal tunnel and cubital tunnel are typically neuropraxia. A neuropraxia usually has a better prognosis than neurotmesis which is a more serious injury. Sometimes surgery is needed. ...Read more

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30% nerve damage. Dr says I'm in late early stage into beginning of moderate stage. Was glaucoma caught early enough to prevent vision loss long-term?

30% nerve damage. Dr says I'm in late early stage into beginning of moderate stage. Was glaucoma caught early enough to prevent vision loss long-term?

Possibly: If you have already lost vision from glaucoma, it can not be reversed. The goal now is to prevent any further loss by getting exams a few times a year looking at your optic nerve and comparing to your prior photos, measuring how thick your nerve is, and testing your peripheral vision. ...Read more

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What are the tests for neuropraxia?

Two tests: Manual muscle strength testing and dynamometry. Emg, nerve excitability test and history and physical exam. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: neuropraxia?

What is the definition or description of: neuropraxia?

Neuropraxia: Neuropraxia is defined as a temporary loss of function of the nerve. Some nerves are purely sensory while others carry both sensory and motor fibers. Traumatic contusion injuries to nerves or nerve compressions can cause Neuropraxia. Sensory nerves like sural nerve in the leg or mixed sensory and motor nerves like the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm & hand are commonly affected nerves. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for neuropraxia?

See below: Neuropraxia is a description of a type of nerve injury in which the outer covering of the nerve called myelin is damaged which causes a delay in nerve transmission. Many of the more common nerve conditions like carpal tunnel and cubital tunnel are typically neuropraxia. A neuropraxia usually has a better prognosis than neurotmesis which is a more serious injury. Sometimes surgery is needed. ...Read more

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Can emg ncs tell the difference between neuropraxia and axonometesis, can it diagnose how long the nerve will take to fully recover?

Yes and no: Yes am EMG /ncs is used to differentiate neuropraxia and axonotmesis but the test itself cannot tell how long a lesion will take to recover. The physician performing the test can give the person an idea of how long an injury will take to heal and whether it is likely to heal based on the test results. ...Read more

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How long does it take to recover from neuropraxia due to a dislocated knee?

How long does it take to recover from neuropraxia due to a dislocated knee?

As much as 18 months: Neuropraxia's are stretch injuries to the nerve. The nerves can slowly regenerate and probably by 18 months your are maximized. You need to be followed by your orthopedist and if they recommend a neurologic workup you may get ncv/emg studies done to assess the nerve function. ...Read more

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How long does it take to recover from neuropraxia after a dislocated knee?

How long does it take to recover from neuropraxia after a dislocated knee?

Time varies: Nerve healing has many variables including the severity of the nerve injury and the different nerve injured. Some injuries are so severe that full recovery never occurs and some are minor and recover faster than expected. Neuropraxia of an intact nerve will have a period of calming followed by recovery of the nerve at a rate of approximately 1 mm / day and will depend on the length of the nerve. ...Read more

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I od'd 3 months ago and lost feeling in my fingers, left hand, following a week on life support. Diagnoses was neuropraxia. Could this be permanent?

I od'd 3 months ago and lost feeling in my fingers, left hand, following a week on life support. Diagnoses was neuropraxia. Could this be permanent?

Can not tell yet: If you compressed a nerve in your arm it takes a long time to recover. For instance compression at the elbow takes many months. Nerves grow back imm per day. Only time will tell good luck. ...Read more

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Can nerve damage heal?

Can nerve damage heal?

Yes: If the damage does not cause the nerve to be completely cut, then healing can occur. If a nerve has been cut, it will need to be reconnected in order to grow. Nerve grows about 1 mm/day, so depending on where the injury is, it may take over a year for recovery. It is difficult after a nerve is cut to get 100% recovery, but some return of sensation can be expected after repair. ...Read more

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Can nerve damage repair itself?

Can nerve damage repair itself?

Sometimes: A broad question, because there are many ways a nerve can be damaged: compression (carpal tunnel), crush, cut, etc. A "bruised" nerve can heal itself; it grows back at about 1 inch/month. If the nerve is divided, it may occasionally heal, but more often needs surgical repair--and this doesn't always result in return of function. ...Read more

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Does a m r I show nerve damage?

Does a m r I show nerve damage?

Not really: An EMG is the best test for nerve damage. The MRI can show evidence of compression or damage but cannot quantitate it or really confirm its extent. In most cases. ...Read more

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Can nerve damage reverse itself?

Variable: Generically, if only the coverings of a nerve are involved (myelin), and healing begins, it will take about 4 weeks. If the central portion of the nerve fibre is involved (axon), recovery is the speed of finger nail growth (.1 mm daily). Depends on location, causation, and whether successful treatment is available. ...Read more

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How permanent can nerve damage be?

How permanent can nerve damage be?

Very permanent: Your question is not open to an answer because you offer no specifics. What nerve? How severe is the involvement? ...Read more

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How to know if I have nerve damage?

Nerve damage?: Please consult with your primary care physician or a neurologist for a thorough exam. ...Read more

Dr. Olav Jaren
1,343 Doctors shared insights

Nerve Damage (Definition)

A complete nerve transection will leave an area totally numb. The distribution of the numbers depends upon where the nerve was cut. A partial nerve injury may leave the area tingly or incompletely numb. Finally even if the nerve is not cut the swelling and bruising to the tea can affect the nerve as well. Usually we consider sharp penetrating injuries as likely having nerve lacerations when sensation is lost. A hand surgeon can examine the hand and pinpoint the site or extent of nerve injury and recommend ...Read more


Dr. Mitchell Cohn
571 Doctors shared insights

Nerve Injury (Definition)

Nerve injury is a general term for any problem with the nerve that results form injury. It can present as pain, numbness, ...Read more