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Doctor insights on: Myasthenia Gravis

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Dr. Julian Bragg
367 Doctors shared insights

Myasthenia Gravis (Overview)

A chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease characterized by varying degrees of weakness of the skeletal (voluntary) muscles of the body.


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What is myasthenia gravis?

What is myasthenia gravis?

Fatigable weakness: Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that disrupts the neuromuscular junction, so that when motor nerves fire the muscle fibers do not reliably contract. It manifests as a "fatigable weakness" (one that gets worse with sustained effort) that can involve the limbs, the cranial nerves (hoarseness, double vision, difficulty swallowing), or, in some dangerous cases, muscles of breathing. ...Read more

Dr. Julian Bragg
367 Doctors shared insights

Myasthenia Gravis (Overview)

A chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease characterized by varying degrees of weakness of the skeletal (voluntary) muscles of the body.


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How does mestinon (pyridostigmine) help myasthenia gravis?

How does mestinon (pyridostigmine) help myasthenia gravis?

Activate muscle: Myasthenia disrupts the connection between nerve and muscle by reducing the number of receptors for a transmitter called acetylcholine. Mestinon (pyridostigmine) prevents acetylcholine from being broken down in the body, giving it more time to diffuse along the muscle and activate the remaining receptors. The net result is to restore effective transmission between nerve and muscle. ...Read more

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Are myasthenia gravis symptoms usually consistent throughout the day?

No, very variable: The hallmark of myasthenia is fatigable weakness that gets worse with activity. If the symptoms do not vary with time of day or activity, alternative (or additional) diagnoses should be considered. ...Read more

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What are the first symptoms of myasthenia gravis?

What are the first symptoms of myasthenia gravis?

Ptosis: Ptosis (droopiness of one or both eyes) or proximal muscle weakness of arm, thigh or neck. ...Read more

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Need expert help here. What are some signs of myasthenia gravis?

Visual: Start out with double vision, droopy eyelids, and may just feel weak. A good evaluation from a neurologist is starting point if this is your concern. ...Read more

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I went for a new member physical test for a merchant mariner job and put not fit for duty due to a new diagnose of myasthenia gravis, what to do?

Myasthenia gravis: This is a autoimmune neuromuscular problem that needs immediate attention. There is good treatment available. See myasthenia gravis foundation at www. Myasthenia. Org for lots of help finding the right doctors etc. ...Read more

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Does mestinon (pyridostigmine) effect diagnostic blood test results for myasthenia gravis?

NO, NOT AT ALL: Mestinon (pyridostigmine) enhances neuromuscular junctional efficiency by enhancing acetylcholine persistence, but is NOT an immune agent like a steroid. The standard testing for myasthenia gravis looks at antibody reactions, and would be positive or negative irregardless of use of Mestinon (pyridostigmine). ...Read more

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Would the severity of symptoms of myasthenia gravis be visible in any blood tests?

May be: Severity of myasthenia gravis is a clinical issue and does not need lab tests. However lab tests are useful in diagnosis. See this site for more info.
http://www. Arupconsult. Com/topics/mg. Html. ...Read more

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Recently diagnosed with myasthenia gravis and about to start mestinon (pyridostigmine). What do I need to know?

Recently diagnosed with myasthenia gravis and about to start mestinon (pyridostigmine). What do I need to know?

Symptom treatment: While myasthenia reduces the effectiveness of muscle activation, Mestinon (pyridostigmine) works to increase it. It works well and starts working quickly, but does not change the course of the underlying disease- typically an immune modifying drug is used in conjunction with it to prevent disease progression. Typical side effects include diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and muscle twitches. ...Read more

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What causes myasthenia gravis?

Autoimmune: We have discovered that the connection between nerve and muscle is compromised by injury to the neuromuscular junction by an antibody that affects acetylcholine transmission. Thus, for whatever reason, the body immune system is attacking itself. ...Read more

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Tested for acetylcholine receptor ab panel; both binding and blocking were 0, but modulating came back at 10. Does this mean I have myasthenia gravis?

AchRAntibodies: Binding antibodies are the most sensitive--they are positive in over 80% of ms patients. Blocking antibodies are positive in about half. Modulating antibodies alone don't support the diagnosis and have a lot oof false positives. In summary the achreceptor antibody panel does not suggest that ou have ms>. ...Read more

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What things can I do to treat myasthenia gravis at home?

What things can I do to treat myasthenia gravis at home?

Not much: About 1/3 can see spontaneous remission, 1/3 stabilize on chronic medications, and 1/3 have progressive difficulties. Chronic and/or longterm medications may aid but can have significant adverse impact on life and/or health. In appropriate candidates, thoracic surgery to remove thymus (thymectomy) can possibly cure: http://goo. Gl/3xxmd. ...Read more

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I am suffering from myasthenia gravis, which kind of doctor treats this best?

I am suffering from myasthenia gravis, which kind of doctor treats this best?

Depends: Generally, start with neurologist. He/she will confirm diagnosis and provide longterm treatments as necessary. In appropriate candidates, thoracic surgery to remove thymus (thymectomy) can possibly cure: http://goo. Gl/3xxmd. ...Read more

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What is myasthenia gravis and how is it treated?

Immune disorder: Which affects to neuromuscular junction connections of nerve to muscle. Associated with progressive weakness on exertion, and can be associated with double vision, problems breathing, and swallowing. Treatment in past involved, steroids, immune agents, and meds that affect the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for myasthenia gravis?

What is the treatment for myasthenia gravis?

Multiple: About 1/3 can see spontaneous remission, 1/3 stabilize on chronic medications, and 1/3 have progressive difficulties. Chronic and/or longterm medications may aid but can have significant adverse impact on life and/or health. In appropriate candidates, thoracic surgery to remove thymus (thymectomy) can possibly cure: http://goo. Gl/3xxmd. ...Read more

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Can you have complete cure of myasthenia gravis?

Yes: Often, people may experience complete remission of mg. The thymus gland is sometimes removed which is believed to help promote complete remission in many people. Best of luck. ...Read more

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Would history of drug abuse be a cause for myasthenia gravis?

No: Myasthenia gravis is a curious autoimmune disease. I've seen nothing in my decades in medicine to suggest that any of the drugs of abuse trigger this sort of autoimmunity. Don't try to find an explanation, but instead by glad that the past addiction is indeed in the past. ...Read more

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Who can develop myasthenia gravis?

Women>men: Before the age of 40 mg is 3x more common in women, but at older ages both sexes are equally affected. Familial cases are rare. Congenital mg in children are rarely encountered. Their mothers are asymptomatic, and the condition is often familial. Limb weakness is present but eye movement weakness is the dominant sign. There are also neonatal forms characterized by weak suck, and juvenile forms. ...Read more

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Who is at risk myasthenia gravis?

Who is at risk myasthenia gravis?

Wide range of people: Myasthenia has been reported in people of all age groups, but it tends to be more common in people aged 50-70 or in women under 40. Conditions that increase your risk for developing myasthenia include: autoimmune disease (thyroid disease, lupus, rheumatoid, type I diabetes), thymoma, and exposure to certain medications (most famously an immunosuppressant and chelating agent called penicillamine). ...Read more

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Can myasthenia gravis be prevented from happening?

MG: Usually not. But people may have less exacerebations if they have strong immune systems. There are not many studies on that. There is also a long list of medications which can cause acute attack of mg. ...Read more

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I live INACTIVE life due 2 having Myasthenia gravis & severe Osteo. SO, on days I do a LOT I'm worn. Normal? Or would it flare it I kept active or no?

See rheuma: I strongly recommend that you consult a rheumatologist to get your disease condition undercontrolled. I don't see why both conditions cannot be improved with today's medications. The less activities the more osteoporosis. Get the right help now. ...Read more

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What is myasthenia gravis?

Fatigable weakness: Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that disrupts the neuromuscular junction, so that when motor nerves fire the muscle fibers do not reliably contract. It manifests as a "fatigable weakness" (one that gets worse with sustained effort) that can involve the limbs, the cranial nerves (hoarseness, double vision, difficulty swallowing), or, in some dangerous cases, muscles of breathing. ...Read more

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What causes myasthenia gravis?

Autoimmune: We have discovered that the connection between nerve and muscle is compromised by injury to the neuromuscular junction by an antibody that affects acetylcholine transmission. Thus, for whatever reason, the body immune system is attacking itself. ...Read more

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How common is Myasthenia Gravis?

Prevalence of MG?: It's estimated that MG is present in between 50-60K individuals in the U.S. It will increase as the age of the population increases. ...Read more

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Is myasthenia gravis hereditary?

Unknown: In most cases, myasthenia gravis is not inherited and occurs in people with no history of the disorder in their family.

About 3 to 5 percent of affected individuals have other family members with myasthenia gravis or other autoimmune disorders, but the inheritance pattern is unknown.

For more info please review the following:
http://www. Myasthenia. Org/whatismg/faqs. Aspx. ...Read more

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How serious is myasthenia gravis?

How serious is myasthenia gravis?

Usually very serious: Myasthenia gravis is typically seen in the young and the elderly. In the latter group, they typically have ocular mg, that is there symptoms are confined to the eye muscles. In the young, symptoms include muscle weakness, breathing difficulties, swallowing difficulties, visual problems (double vision, droopy eye lids), problems chewing. Symptoms worsen during the day. If not treated, it can be fatal. ...Read more

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Who is at risk myasthenia gravis?

Wide range of people: Myasthenia has been reported in people of all age groups, but it tends to be more common in people aged 50-70 or in women under 40. Conditions that increase your risk for developing myasthenia include: autoimmune disease (thyroid disease, lupus, rheumatoid, type I diabetes), thymoma, and exposure to certain medications (most famously an immunosuppressant and chelating agent called penicillamine). ...Read more

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Who can develop myasthenia gravis?

Women>men: Before the age of 40 mg is 3x more common in women, but at older ages both sexes are equally affected. Familial cases are rare. Congenital mg in children are rarely encountered. Their mothers are asymptomatic, and the condition is often familial. Limb weakness is present but eye movement weakness is the dominant sign. There are also neonatal forms characterized by weak suck, and juvenile forms. ...Read more

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How is myasthenia gravis diagnosed?

How is myasthenia gravis diagnosed?

Myasthenia: An intravenous injection called a tensilon test, blood testing for acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and an electrophysiological test called an electromyelogram can all be used to help make a diagnosis of myasthenia. ...Read more

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What causes mg (myasthenia gravis)?

Immune system: Myasthenia is caused by the immune system attacking a protein in the junction between nerve and muscle. This usually happens spontaneously, but can be triggered by drug exposure or by certain types of tumors. ...Read more

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Will myasthenia gravis ever go away?

MG Remission: Yes remission can occur for several year at a time. ...Read more

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Myasthenia gravis can wayfaring cause mg?

It is not possible: Myasthenia gravis can cause weakness in your neck, arms and legs, other muscles. MG is caused by antibodies blocking acetylcholine, but it is not caused by wayfaring. Take care. ...Read more

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What can I do if I have myasthenia gravis?

See specialist: Myasthenia gravis is a potentially life threatening but treatable condition. It has to be treated by a neurologist preferably one who whose sub specialty is neuromuscular disease. ...Read more

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How will myasthenia gravis affect the body?

Fatigable weakness: The hallmark of myasthenia is "fatigable weakness", meaning that muscles get weaker with prolonged use. Typical symptoms include double vision, droopy eyelids, or weakness of the limbs, all worse with activity or at the end of the day. It can also cause difficulty speaking, swallowing, and breathing, which can be extremely dangerous. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of myasthenia gravis?

What are the symptoms of myasthenia gravis?

Weakness: Characteristically, it is a disease affecting nerve and muscle connections, and may initially present with double vision, drooping of eyelids, and weakness involving arms and legs. Repetitive usage of muscles can result in increased weakness and increased lid drooping and double vision. If the problem intensifies, difficulty with breathing can occur, and this may become critical. ...Read more

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How do medications treat myasthenia gravis?

Two ways: Some medications are designed to enhance the neuromuscular junction connection, and prolong presence of acetylcholine. Since myasthenia is an autoimmune disorder, steroids and other immune agents can address the underlying causation. ...Read more

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What can you tell me about myasthenia gravis?

Weakness: An immunological disorder of the neuromuscular junction, affecting efficiency of nerve muscle impulses, by making acetylcholine surge ineffective. Repetitive contractions are increasingly weak. May affect eye muscles predominantly, with double vision, and lid drooping, but can also affect arms and legs, and ability to breathe. Thymectomy may help, meds also useful. ...Read more

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What canworsen my myasthenia gravis symptoms?

What canworsen my myasthenia gravis symptoms?

Medications: Infections and medications can cause worionsening og mg. Medications like certain antibiotics, anesthetic agents, muscle relaxants, Botox injections etc. Decrease immune system related to multiple factors like lack of sleep, overexhaustion etc. ...Read more