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Doctor insights on: Is Hemophilia A Terminal Disease

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Is hemophilia a terminal disease?

Is hemophilia a terminal disease?

NO: The HIV epidemic affected many hemophiliacs but those that survived through that time and those diagnosed after the HIV epidemic was fully realized have an opportunity to have their disease effectively managed. ...Read more

Dr. Jan Lei Iwata
26 Doctors shared insights

Factor Viii Deficiency (Definition)

Factor VIII deficiency (also known as Hemophilia A) is disease of the blood in which a person lacks a protein necessary for clotting. These patients are prone to excessive ...Read more


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I want to know what's the hemophilia disease?

I want to know what's the hemophilia disease?

Bleeding disorder: Classical hemophilia, also called hemophilia a, is a bleeding disorder due to deficiency of clotting factor viii and affects boys almost exclusively. About 1 in 5000 boys are born with it. There are other types of hemophilia too. See this site for more info.
http://www. Nhlbi. Nih. Gov/health/health-topics/topics/hemophilia/. ...Read more

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How can the inheritance of colorblindness and hemophilia differ from other diseases that can be inherited?

X-linked vs. Others: Hemophilia and color blindness are inherited through x-chromosome. This means that females (who have two x chromosomes, which makes them females) are generally less affected. Males are more severely affected (they have one x and one y chromosome which lacks genes). Other modes are autosomal recessive (parents carriers), dominant (parent often affected) or mitochondrial (from maternal line). ...Read more

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Uncle has a type of hemophilia 1 as I do. I want to know what the probablity of my children obtaining this disease and how come?

Uncle has a type of hemophilia 1 as I do. I want to know what the probablity of my children obtaining this disease and how come?

Genetics: You have possibly carrier gene. Double recessive gene will express that is disease hemophelia. It was common in the royal family due to in breeding
read up on tramission of genes and inheritable diseases. There is lot of informaltion available reserch on it and will discuss if any more questions. ...Read more

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(for hw)How do you know if a disease is infectious or not? Are all diseases that exist since birth noninfectious? Is hemophilia infectious?

(for hw)How do you know if a disease is infectious or not? Are all diseases that exist since birth noninfectious? Is hemophilia infectious?

Many viral induced: If a disease is not congenital then it is secondary to a chemical or infectious process. Latter is seen from MMTV virus causing breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer and lymphoma entering Wnt-1 gene. Other diseases caused by infection such as stomach cancer with helicobacter, colon Ca from polyoma virus as well as the leukemias. Well recognized. ...Read more

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I want to know what is the difference between von willebrand's disease and hemophilia?

Different but....: Related. Vwf is a glycoprotein important for primary hemostasis. It cross links collagen at a site of injury with gpib on platelets. Deficiency leads to failure of primary hemostasis (ie, bleeding). Vwf also protects fviii from degradation. Fviii partners with fix to activate fx to ultimately promote clotting. So, while different, fviii & vwf deficiency can have similar presentations. Simplified! ...Read more

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Could people with von willebrand disease or hemophilia get tattoos?

Yes: Like everything else involving body art, it's at your own risk. Your physician might be your best guide here. If you take a factor before other procedures, this would perhaps be a good time. Start with something small. I like well-chosen body art and if this is something you've really wanted for some time, I hope you're able to get it. ...Read more

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If a guy who is not a hemophilia patient, but has an uncle (mother's brother) who has the disease, can he carry the gene?

If a guy who is not a hemophilia patient, but has an uncle (mother's brother) who has the disease, can he carry the gene?

No: No, he cannot. The gene for hemophilia is on the x chromosome. Since a man has only one x chromosome, if he had the gene, it would express itself. That means he would show sings of hemophilia. There are only female carriers of the gene. Males will either have the disease or won't have it. ...Read more

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Is hemophilia a thrombotic disorder?

Is hemophilia a thrombotic disorder?

Probably not: Most people would think of disorders that make people more likely to clot (such as factor v leiden abnormality) as 'thrombotic.' hemophilia makes people less likely to clot. Both types of disease fall into the broad category or 'coagulopathy' - abnormalities of the clotting system. ...Read more

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Does bleeding disorder mean I am suffering from hemophilia?

Does bleeding disorder mean I am suffering from hemophilia?

No: There are many types of bleeding disorders. Factor deficiencies are only one type. Hemophilia is factor 8 deficiency or factor 9 deficiency. There are platelet disorders as well which cause bleeding. ...Read more

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What are some other sex-link disorders other than hemophilia and color blindness?

What are some other sex-link disorders other than hemophilia and color blindness?

See below: There is a long list of such disorders, e.g., muscular dystrophy, agammaglobulinemia, hemolytic anemia, alport type kidney disease, mental retardation and more. See this site for a list.
http://en. Wikipedia. Org/wiki/x-linked_recessive_inheritance. ...Read more

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I had some questions on the hemophilia bleeding disorder? Is bad nosebleeds a mild form of it?

In some cases: Not all conditions of recurrent nosebleeds are due to hemophilia. Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder which can lead to frequent nosebleeds. There are two clotting pathways, the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Hemophilia is involved in the intrinsic pathway. ...Read more

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I have to do a genetic disorder report for class and was debating between color blindness and hemophilia. What are your opinions?

Both interesting: These are both fascinating diseases and the subject of much inquiry. Look on wikipedia and you will find much to talk about. The issues are quite different but the underpinning for each is genetic. The hemophilia has had impacts on history such as the family of queen victoria. Color deficiency has caused some famous accidents. Have fun. ...Read more

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What is hemophilia?

Clotting problem: Hemophilia is a hereditary blood disorder in which the person is deficient in one of the body's clotting factors (factor viii for hemophilia a and factor ix for hemophilia b). Therefore the blood does not clot correctly after an injury. Depending on severity, patients with hemophilia bleed and bruise easily and for a longer time. Some may even bleed into their joints, muscles, or brain. ...Read more

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Is hemophilia lifelong?  

Yes: About 17, 000 people in the United States have hemophilia. The blood of a person who has hemophilia, a rare, inherited bleeding disease, lacks a protein important to proper clotting. Because it is inherteted at birth it is lifelong. ...Read more

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What causes hemophilia?

Genetic defect: Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder due to abnormal gene for clotting factor viii (hemophilia a) or ix (hemophilia b) that is on the x-chromosome and men inherit the defect from their mothers. Women are carriers and are rarely affected. ...Read more

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How is hemophilia spread?

Inheritance/genetics: Hemophilia is a disorder of clotting due to abnormal genes that are inherited from the mother by the son. Daughters are carriers but generally do not suffer from it. An affected man pass the gene to his daughters but can not pass it to the sone. Daughters pass the disease on to their sons. Rarely a new mutation, de novo, may occur to cause the disease that is then spread to the offspring. ...Read more

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How do you get hemophilia?

Hemophilia: Hemophilia is a genetic disease linked to a defective gene on the x chromosome. Chromosomes come in pairs -- women have two x chromosomes while men have one x and one y chromosome. ...Read more

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How common is hemophilia?  

1:10, 000 males: Hemophillia a in about 1:10, 000 males and hemophilia b in about 1:20, 000 males. It is less common in females. ...Read more

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Who discovered hemophilia?

Conrad Otto: Families in which the males bled after minor trauma were known from antiquity, but Dr. Otto in 1803 established the pattern of inheritance and is credited as discoverer. ...Read more

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How serious is hemophilia?  

Very serious: Interferes with blood clotting, so subject can not easily stop bleeding when it occurs. Not just open bleeding, but into joints which when started will only stop when the pressure within the joint equals the blood pressure, so there is severe joint swelling followed by fibrosis (scarring) within the joint. Similarly uncontolled bleeding can occur into the GI tract and/or lungs. ...Read more

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How is hemophilia treated?  

How is hemophilia treated?  

Hemophilia: The treatment of hemophilia depends on what type the patient has, how severely they are affected, and whether any surgical procedures are planned. Without knowing what type of hemophilia you are discussing I can't be more specific. A good source of information is the national hemophilia foundation at www. Hemophilia. Org. ...Read more

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What exactly is hemophilia?

Gene for bleeding: The two common hemophilias are lack of factor viii (hemophilia a) and factor ix (hemophilia b) respectively. Of variable severity, these people are prone to bleed too easily especially from blunt trauma. Treatment consists of replacement of the missing factor and is a complicated business with specialists that are well-equipped to do this. Cure by gene therapy may soon be here for ix. Good luck. ...Read more

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Can you die from hemophilia?

Yes: Hemophilia makes bleeding very difficult to stop. People with hemophilia may not be able to properly stop even minor bleeding, and particularly internal bleeding can be hard to detect until late in the game. ...Read more

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What is acquired hemophilia?  

Bleeding disorder: Acquired hemophilia is when the body spontaneously makes autoantibodies (a signal that tells the immune response to respond to one of the body's normal components) for coagulation factor (these factors help with blood clotting) viii. This is usually in association with various autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. ...Read more

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How is hemophilia inherited?  

How is hemophilia inherited?  

Hemo."A" is X-linked: Hemophilia "a" is a hereditary bleeding disorder where there is a deficiency in clotting factor viii (factor viii is needed for blood clotting). It is inherited on the x-chromosome (sex-linked). Men only have 1 "x", so if their "x" is mutated, they will have the disease. Women have 2 "x's", so they can have 1 mutated "x" and 1 normal "x", and be a carrier of the disease, with mild or no symptoms. ...Read more

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What gives people hemophilia?

Depends: There are two types of hemophilia (besides the a, b, c) - genetic (the most common and well-known) and acquired. Genetic is just that - it's from birth due to a genetic mutation. The acquired form develops later in life and is often caused by an immune reaction from an infection or substance (like a medication) that causes the immune system to attack certain parts of the hematologic system. ...Read more

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How is hemophilia diagnosed?  

Hemophilia panels: There are very specific panels to measure the overall clotting of the blood, and the exact measurement of the clotting factors involved with coagulation. In general hemophilia refers to hemophila a (a decrease in factor viii) or hemophilia b (factor (ix). ...Read more

Dr. Susumu Inoue
123 Doctors shared insights

Hemophilia (Definition)

A disorder in which ...Read more