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Doctor insights on: Arthroscopy

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Dr. Thomas Deberardino
1,283 doctors shared insights

Arthroscopy (Overview)

Arthroscopy is minimally invasive joint surgery, commonly used for the knee & shoulder, but also for the ankle, hip, wrist, elbow and other joints. A camera with a fiber optic cable is attached to a video screen placed thru a 1 cm incision and other instruments are introduced thru other small incisions to do the work required. The small incisions allow for quicker recovery than open surgery.


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What is a mr arthroscopy?

What is a mr arthroscopy?

MR athroscopy: You may be asking about virtural mr arthroscopy which is an examination of a joint to elaborate on the finding of an MRI arthography exam. This test is done by radiologists to assist doctors in diagnosis. ...Read more

Dr. Thomas Deberardino
1,283 doctors shared insights

Arthroscopy (Overview)

Arthroscopy is minimally invasive joint surgery, commonly used for the knee & shoulder, but also for the ankle, hip, wrist, elbow and other joints. A camera with a fiber optic cable is attached to a video screen placed thru a 1 cm incision and other instruments are introduced thru other small incisions to do the work required. The small incisions allow for quicker recovery than open surgery.


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What will an arthroscopy entail?

What will an arthroscopy entail?

Surgery w/ a camera: Arthroscopic surgery involves using a camera to address problems in and around a joint, such as for knee meniscus tears, ACL tears in the knee, and rotator cuff tears in the shoulder, to name a few. The advantages of arthroscopic surgery are that it is minimally invasive (small incisions) and it allows for excellent visualization of the structures in and around the joint. ...Read more

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What kind of dr do u arthroscopy?

What kind of dr do u arthroscopy?

Orthopedic surgeon: Doctor do arthroscopy usually orthopedic surgeon. Thanks. ...Read more

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What are the main risks of an arthroscopy?

What are the main risks of an arthroscopy?

Failure to improve: As with all surgeries there is inherent risk of infection, bleeding, nerve injury, etc. However with the small incisions and minimal invasiveness of a well performed arthroscopy these risks are quite minimal. Other rare complications include blood clots or compartment syndrome (severe uncontrolled swelling of extremity, culminating in nerve and muscle damage). ...Read more

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What are normal results for an arthroscopy?

Depends on reason: Arthroscopy is a method of performing surgical procedures. Many joints can be treated arthroscopically. Without knowing the specific joint, the reason for surgery, and the procedure performed, it is impossible to give “normal results.” but, in general, for the right indications, the results of arthroscopic procedures are very good to excellent. ...Read more

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What are some considerations of arthroscopy?

Can be limited: Wrist arthroscopy is an excellent, fairly low risk procedure for diagnosing and treating many wrist conditions including, ligament tears, synovitis, mild arthritis and ganglion cysts. It is limited to what can be performed through small portals in the wrist and sometimes other procedures may be needed. ...Read more

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I have an arthroscopy tomorrow, what to expect?

Minimal pain.: Arthroscopy involves the insertion of a fiberoptic tube inside your joint. This allows the surgeon to see what is going on inside your joint and if there are loose bodies, they are removed. If there is a tear in the cartilage, the ligament or the tendon then they are repaired.
The procedure is with minimal pain but some swelling depending on what is done. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: arthroscopy?

Joint Surgery: Arthroscopy is minimally invasive joint surgery, commonly used for the knee & shoulder, but also for the ankle, hip, wrist, elbow and other joints.
A camera with a fiber optic cable is attached to a video screen placed thru a 1 cm incision and other instruments are introduced thru other small incisions to do the work required.
The small incisions allow for quicker recovery than open surgery. ...Read more

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What are some tips and what to expect from an arthroscopy?

What joint ?: Arthroscopic procedures have become very common and often complicated procedures are done thru multiple small incisions. You really need to talk to your surgeon. ...Read more

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What is the main difference orthroscopy and an arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy: It appears that orthroscopy is a misspelling of the term arthroscopy. So there is no difference. ...Read more

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How long will I have to wait to exercise if I'm getting an arthroscopy to repair possible torn?

10 days to 2 weeks: Swelling goes down starting day 4-5.
As swelling goes down, bending improves and pain lessens. You can start light exercise when your knee swelling is mostly resolved and your pain has minimized. For many, this can be as early as 1-2 weeks. For most 2-3 weeks later this should be fine. Let pain and swelling be your guide. Once the meniscus is trimmed, internally your fine and can't hurt it. ...Read more

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I've been diagnosed a mild medial meniscopathy and I'll be practised an arthroscopy. What exercises would you recommend me in the meantime?

I've been diagnosed a mild medial meniscopathy and I'll be practised an arthroscopy. What exercises would you recommend me in the meantime?

Low impact: I would recommend low impact exercise including quad and hamstring strengthening. Avoid deep knee bending and a twisting or turning. Ice your knee after exercise. ...Read more

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What are the risks associated with an arthroscopy?

What are the risks associated with an arthroscopy?

Minimal: The most common risk factor sited for arthroscopy are infection, bleeding, and damage to veins, arteries, or nerves. Other risks include acute swelling, and incision pain. All of these risks are relatively rare and occur at a less than 1% frequency. ...Read more

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How long should I be resting after an arthroscopy?

How long should I be resting after an arthroscopy?

Careful activity: Depends on what was done. Slow return to activity with careful range of motion and strengthening. Start about 48h post op. ...Read more

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Are there any side effects to arthroscopy procedures?

Yes: Side effects include the scars of the procedure, which you can see on the skin, but also include the underlying subcutaneous tissue and joint capsule, scarring around the fat pad, which lies just behind the patella tendon, some reactive capsulitis, occasional numbness, especially the lateral (outside) of the knee, and then the side effects of whatever is done, which should include less pain. ...Read more

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What to do about hip arthroscopies in both hips didn't work?

What to do about hip arthroscopies in both hips didn't work?

Diagnosis: It all comes down to the specific diagnosis for why you are still having problems, only then can treatment options be known. Also, don't hesitate to get a second opinion. A new set of eyes looking at your case can be very helpful. ...Read more

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I am about to have arthroscopy on my shoulder in a few weeks. Why should I have to wait?

I am about to have arthroscopy on my shoulder in a few weeks. Why should I have to wait?

Let me try to help: To wait for surgery there are two main reasons. The first one, were you having some health issue they like to clear before they operate. Second the surgery schedule for either the doctor or the operative room is full. Thank you. ...Read more

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Ihad an arthroscopy a year ago and my kne has locked straight it's been like it for a week now, it has happened before but was able to unlock in 4 days?

Need to be evaluated: Locking is not normal in any knee. Locking in extension is more likely a knee cap problem, but could be a torn cartilage. You should have this evaluated by the surgeon who performed surgery on your knee a year ago. You may need physical therapy but you may need further surgery. The surgeon knows what's going on in your knee and would have a better idea of what could be causing your problem. ...Read more

Dr. Jan Lei Iwata
4 doctors shared insights

Arthroscopic Surgery (Definition)

Arthroscopic surgery involves looking inside of a joint with a very small camera. The joint is filled with water and the camera is placed into the joint, using small incisions. Most orthopaedic surgeons utilize arthroscopic surgery to treat a variety of conditions, including: meniscal and rotator cuff years, joint infections and inflammation, removal of loose ...Read more