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A 33-year-old female asked:

33yo. high cholesterol. family history of stroke. is oral contraception even an option for me?

5 doctor answers14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Donald Colantino
Internal Medicine 61 years experience
Birth control: In my opinion, you are young enough to handle the hormones in birth control pills if they are not high in the progestin component, but smoking is an absolute no no, and following a low cholesterol,low saturated fat diet is a necessity. We don't recommend the ingredients in oral contraceptives for menopausal age groups.
Dr. Richard Romano
Internal Medicine 9 years experience
High cholesterol : The question is how high is your cholesterol? There are people with very high cholesterol and have a high risk of atherosclerosis. Increasing that risk with birth control with those patients who need a risk vs benefit discussion.
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology 49 years experience
Agree with Dr. C: How high is your cholesterol. Depending on other lipids and your risk factors you may be no more at risk of stroke than the next person. You should discuss the matter with your doctor to have an appropriate diet. Regular exercise will mitigate some of the risk. If need be do not hesitate to take statins, if your doctor recommends that. Wish you good health!
Dr. Kristen Dall-Winther
Family Medicine 17 years experience
Yes: I agree with one of the other docs; you are young enough to use ocps. I wouldn't suggest being on them for years and years but for the next couple, I think you'd be ok. Generally speaking, we worry more about estrogen than progesterone, so you could choose a progestin-only option for added security. Local use with a Mirena IUD could be a great choice! Lasts for 5 years. Good luck!
Dr. John Berryman
Obstetrics and Gynecology 54 years experience
BCP ?'s: Low dose oral contraceptives at early thirties have arguably less estrogen than not taking them, b/c as one ages, more estrogen is produced secondary to ovarian stimulation to produce ovulation. Estrogen is a vasoconstricter, so in many cases, use of low dose oral contraceptives may decrease the incidence of stroke. Pregnancy is a hypercoagulable state, so may increase chance of stroke.

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Similar questions

A 37-year-old member asked:

Can I take birth control pills while breastfeeding?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Katherine Sutherland
Gynecology 43 years experience
Yes: During breastfeeding, you can use progesterone-only birth control pills. You should avoid estrogen containing pills because they can decrease your milk supply. Other Progesterone only forms of contraception that are useful postpartum are depo-provera, the Implanon implant, and the levonorgesterol iud.
A 37-year-old member asked:

Could my family history influence my high blood pressure increase preeclampsia?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Too some degree: Family history does play a role in tendency towards high blood pressure. But you can exert some control over your risk by sticking to a healthy diet and staying close to your ideal body weight.
A 39-year-old member asked:

My mother told me certain oral contraceptives did not wok for her, will this be the same for me?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Amy Herold
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
No: The definition of "work" with birth control pills is vague, it usually means not getting pregnant. For them to not work can be because they weren't taken every day or other meds were taken that decrease their effectiveness, such as antibiotics. This is not genetic. If "not working" was having side effects, like mood changes, to some types of hormones, that may or may not happen to family members.
A 40-year-old member asked:

Is it safe to take birth control while taking antibiotics?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lonna Larsh
Family Medicine 30 years experience
Yes, but: Most antibiotics and many other medications lower the effectiveness of birth control pills, so it is safest to also use condoms as well.
A 34-year-old member asked:

Can birth control pills cause or help heart problems?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Alan Patterson
Obstetrics and Gynecology 42 years experience
BCPILLS: Can cause rarely ht attack , blood clots, strokes, if you have ht problems you would need to check with both your cardiologist and gyn before using any type of birth control pill , depending on your problem and situation, some people can and some people cannot.

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Last updated May 6, 2019
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