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A 22-year-old member asked:

will the hpv vaccine prevent all warts?

4 doctor answers12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Patricia Roy
Family Medicine 40 years experience
No: There are over 100 types of hpv, that cause everything form common plantar warts, vocal cord nodules, and papillomas. The vaccine only protects against 4 strains of hpv., in the case of gardasil, and 2 strains, in the case of cervrix.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Pediatrics 22 years experience
90 % of all genital: No, but it will help prevent 90 % of all genital warts since that many are caused by types 6 and 11 that are included in the vaccine gardisil. The other brand Cervarix dos not have those types and is not indicated to prevent infection with genital warts.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 44 years experience
No: The stains that the vaccine protects you from are the ones that cause cancer, not common warts.
Dr. Carrie Cannon
A Verified Doctor commented
A US doctor answered Learn more
It depends on whether it is bivalent or quadravalent. Types 16,18 without or with 6,11 http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv-vaccine-hcp.htm
Sep 21, 2014
Dr. Carrie Cannon
A Verified Doctor commented
A US doctor answered Learn more
HPV types 6 and 11 in the quadravalent vaccine protect from 90% of genital warts. Dr. Friedlander means it won't protect from other skin warts.
Sep 21, 2014
Dr. Yash Khanna
Family Medicine 57 years experience
No Not All But: It will not protect against two of the most common strains that cause genital warts .But does not provide immunity against all warts may be 90%

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A member asked:

Could my child have measles if he broke out in a rash after getting the MMR vaccine?

4 doctor answers19 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Saul
Pediatrics 60 years experience
Yes: It is not unusual to have a rash after a measles vaccine. This is not measles nor contagous.
A member asked:

Do children experience side effects from the chicken pox vaccine?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Pediatrics 27 years experience
Yes: All vaccines and all medications and all medical interventions have side effects. Fortunately the common side effects of vaccines are mild and pass quickly. They include pain at the injection site, rashes, and fevers. Very rarely, more serious side effects are possible. If you think your child is having a significant reaction to a vaccine (or any medicine), contact your doctor.
A 34-year-old member asked:

How can I prevent swollen ankles and feet in pregnancy?

7 doctor answers21 doctors weighed in
Dr. Amy Herold
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Avoid salt: Swollen feet and ankles are common in pregnancy. As the uterus gets bigger it puts pressure on the blood vessels in the pelvis returning the blood from the legs back to the heart. This can make blood flow slower and increase swelling. Avoiding salt, drinking plenty of water, and elevating your feet can help reduce swelling. Be aware it may not go away until a few weeks after the baby is born.
Dr. Madhu Kandarpa
Nephrology and Dialysis 9 years experience
Check with your obstetrician- need to check blood pressure and urine for any protein.
Sep 8, 2013
A 21-year-old member asked:

I have ametal platein my leg, and need anmri scanof my low back. Will the metal plate prevent me from getting the mri?

3 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Saponaro
Specializes in Radiology
No: Before your MRI you will be asked a series of questions to determine if the MRI is safe for you. The metal plate in your leg should not prevent you from getting an mri. If you become uncomfortable during the scan, you may have to stop and take a break.
A 47-year-old member asked:

Prevent malaria best with doxycycline or mefloquine if travelling abroad?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joel Gallant
Infectious Disease 36 years experience
Depends: The choice of prophylaxis is based in part on where you're going and the resistance patterns of the malaria in the area. The cdc has a good website that discusses this issue based on region or country. When in doubt, see a travel medicine specialist.

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Last updated Oct 10, 2017

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