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Unionville, TN
A 24-year-old female asked:

what type of hysterectomy is usually recommended after several failed leep procedures?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Yonatan Mahller
Obstetrics and Gynecology 12 years experience
Total Hysterectomy: Total hysterectomy meaning uterus and cervix. This would mean leaving the ovaries in the body. Some advise also removing the fallopian tubes.

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Similar questions

A 34-year-old member asked:

How do I know if hysterectomy is right for my cervical cancer?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Zisow
Obstetrics and Gynecology 47 years experience
Maybe: Assuming that you have "non-invasive cervical cancer" and if you are done having children, hysterectomy is fine. If not, there are other options available to preserve your potential fertility. Your general gynecologist should be able to direct this care for you unless you have "invasive cervical cancer", in which case you should consult with a gyn oncologist.
A 21-year-old member asked:

How do they decide whether to sample lymph nodes during a hysterectomy for uterine cancer?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Patrick Weix
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
They usually just do: Most surgeries where the uterus is removed for uterine cancers will have some lymph node sampling. This sampling is not usually done when the pre-operative diagnosis is a pre-cancerous condition, even though cancer may be found on the final pathology evaluation. Surgeries to place radioactive implants to treat cancer do not involve lymph node sampling.
A 22-year-old member asked:

If I need a hysterectomy, does that mean my sex life is over?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Denise Elser
Specializes in Gynecology
Absolutely not: After a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus), the vagina continues to function as a sexual organ. A total hysterectomy, which removes the uterus and cervix may leave the vagina slightly shorter, but should still be long enough. If the ovaries are removed in a woman who has not yet undergone menopause, then estrogen therapy may be indicated to keep ph, vaginal moisture and pelvic blood flow healthy.
A 38-year-old member asked:

Can you get ovarian cancer after a hysterectomy?

2 doctor answers14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Devon Webster
Medical Oncology 22 years experience
Yes: "hysterectomy " technically means removal of the uterus, not the ovaries and the uterus. A bso (bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy) means removal of both ovaries and fallopian tubes. Even if the ovaries have been removed, there is a very small chance that ovarian cancer can develop from cells that line the abdominal cavity. This chance is much less than 1 in 100.
Dr. Michael Thompson
Hematology and Oncology 20 years experience
I agree with Dr. Webster, and this is likely getting too detailed for HT, but cells similar to (related to development in the embryo) ovarian cells may be in the peritoneum (abdominal lining). A cancer of those cells is called primary peritoneal carcinoma and is treated similar to ovarian cancer.
Dec 16, 2011
A 31-year-old member asked:

Are menopausal symptoms common after a hysterectomy, when you still have your ovaries?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Maritza Baez
Family Medicine 17 years experience
Yes: Yes. Menopause happens when the hormones in your ovaries run out. So as long as you have ovaries (it doesn't matter if you don't have a uterus), you will eventually go through menopause.

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Last updated Jan 5, 2019
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