A 70-year-old female asked:
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how do you treat a pinched nerve in the back?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Julian Bragg
17 years experience Neurology
Chemistry & Physics: Pinched nerves can be treated by relieving the pressure on the nerve or by using medications to reduce the irritability of the nerve in response to that pressure. This is usually performed with combination treatment including physical therapy, medications (oral or injected), or surgery.
Answered on Mar 27, 2014
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Dr. Bahman Omrani
17 years experience Pain Management
PinchedNerveTeatment: Depends on the cause, most common being nerve compression by adjacent anatomic structures (eg discs, degenerative arthritis). In absence of progressive neurological deficit, a trial of conservative (meds, pt, epidural injections) may be tried. If this fails and/or neurological deficit progressive, surgery may be next best step.
Answered on Aug 3, 2013
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