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how can i treat asthma?

6 doctor answers
Dr. Paul Williams
27 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Depends on severity: There are different "types" of asthma and different severities. Treatment depends on frequency of symptoms, how much it impacts your life, need for urgent care and others. There are many treatments available, and asthma is usually controllable.
Answered on Dec 17, 2017
6
6 thanks
Dr. Jack Mutnick
16 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Asthma: See an asthma specialist to get a regimen specifically designed for you. Every asthmatic is a different individual with individual medication needs.
Answered on Feb 24, 2018
10
10 thanks
Dr. Lee Perry
Dr. Lee Perry answered
16 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Inhaled steroids: The most common medications used to treat asthma include short-acting beta agonists (albuterol), both inhaled and nebulized forms, and inhaled corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are used to prevent asthma symptoms, while albuterol is often used to treat break-through symptoms.
Answered on Jul 20, 2017
11
11 thanks
Dr. Sue Ferranti
28 years experience Internal Medicine
Meds...: Asthma is treated with bronchodilator and steroid inhalers. Other medications can be used as well, depending on your symptoms and triggers as well as disease severity. These meds need to be prescribed by a doctor. Good luck!
Answered on May 24, 2017
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3 thanks
Dr. Michael Rupp
20 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Agree: You need to see an asthma specialist. Every asthma patient is different, but treatments are similar in that they focus on reducing inflammation in the lungs which opens up the air tubes and makes it easier to breathe. Every patient should have a spirometry (breathing test) done to assess the severity of their asthma and later response to treatment.
Answered on May 24, 2017
Dr. Michael Sanders
15 years experience Pulmonology
Step wise treatment: Usually, the treatment starts off with a short acting beta agonist, like albuterol. If this isn't enough, then an inhaled steroid is added. Then, if you need more, a long acting beta agonist/steroid combo is added. During the work up, an IgE level and an allergen panel should be done to see if you would benefit from Xolair.
Answered on May 24, 2017

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Dr. Rifat Naghmi
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Asthma: The treatment depends on the severity. Mild cases - only albuterol as needed. Moderate and severe cases - betaagonists and inhaled steroids.
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Dr. Robin Larabee
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