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A 57-year-old member asked:

are electronic health records more dangerous or less dangerous than paper?

4 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Internal Medicine 35 years experience
? Definition: In what sense? I guess from a privacy standpoint they may be. Safety wise, much better. However, ehr's will only be as good, efficient and accurate as those who put the information into them...
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
More: Ehr's have the flaw that insurance companies and government officials will have full access without your knowledge. Privacy under hippa laws applies only to everyone else. The danger is that your care, personal information, etc. Is easily tapped into by those you might not care to have this data.
Dr. Matt Malkin
Anesthesiology 16 years experience
Depends: Each new technology comes with strengths and weaknesses. Emrs will hopefully save money by making a workup done at another hospital available to other doctors so tests don't get repeated or medical history missed. Will also help collect data for research. Can also suggest or remind docs about things. It's just a tool and it depends on how it is used -discrimination, denial of insurance, privacy.
Dr. Susan Woods
Internal Medicine 35 years experience
Your data for you: Digital information provides greater access to the information -- to the most important person -- you! in practices that use electronic health records and have a patient portal, you may get secure, online access to test results, medication refills, emailing your provider, and perhaps even the clinical note. That less dangerous for you!

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Similar questions

A 38-year-old member asked:

Has anyone hacked into electronic health records?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Keegan Duchicela
Family Medicine 14 years experience
Yes.: Anything stored in an electronic format is "hackable". No system is 100% secure. That goes the same for other sensitive systems like bank records, federal records, etc. There are different levels of security though. Communicating with your doctor through gmail is not as secure as something that is hippa compliant.
A 35-year-old member asked:

Electronic health records should be free to us shouldnt they?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Keegan Duchicela
Family Medicine 14 years experience
They will be.: At some point, the industry will mature to the point where most ehrs will have some sort of patient portal where you can access and view all your medical records through the web. That being said, for legal reasons the storage of your medical records ultimately falls on your doctor. If they're the one recording the info, they need to take responsibility for it.
A 33-year-old member asked:

Has your doctor told you electronic health records are not safe?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Keegan Duchicela
Family Medicine 14 years experience
Depends.: A doctor shouldn't be in the business of guaranteeing anything. Nothing is 100% secure - that goes for banks, amazon, google, and the federal government. But at the very least, your doc's ehr should be "hippa compliant", and you should inquire about the security of their system, how many people have passwords, how often they're changed, etc.
A 40-year-old member asked:

What are rules for destroying paper and electronic health records?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Depends: Active files have no expiration date but can be thinned for convenience. Generally files over 7 years old with no clinic visits can be backfiled or destroyed. There are no rules regarding electronic medical records since there is no space issue at work. I am sure some will be issued with time as the storage space on servers starts to become full.
A 34-year-old member asked:

What are the benefits of converting to electronic health records? My doctor just looks at them instead of me now.

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Keegan Duchicela
Family Medicine 14 years experience
Too early to tell.: While there are some benefits to having an emr - i.e. Readable notes, easy access to labs and imaging... They haven't been conclusively proven to either 1) reduce costs for doctors and patients. 2) improve overall safety for patients. Most of the emrs out there are crud. A few can improve a physician's efficiency (mostly for younger docs). The software hasn't matured yet. Give it 5 years.

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Last updated Jun 8, 2015
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