A 46-year-old female asked:
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is bladder disfuntion a sympton of fibromyalgia?

3 doctor answers
Dr. Jimmy Bowen
33 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Fibromyalgia: It is not part of the criteria of signs or symptoms associated with the diagnosis of fibromyalgia.
Answered on Sep 28, 2016
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3 thanks
Dr. Laurence Badgley
52 years experience General Practice
Yes: Many women with fibromyalgia have nocturia, frequency during auto rides, & have even been diagnosed as having interstitial cystitis. IMO the mechanism is sacroiliac joint subluxation causing presacral plexus impingement and bladder parasympathetic stimulation and evacuation.
Answered on Jul 3, 2015
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2 comments
Dr. Laurence Badgley
52 years experience General Practice
Provided original answer
The reason for a "spectrum of disorder" for fibromyalgia is that the cause, pelvic girdle instability due to pelvic ligament laxity, manifests differently in individuals & genders.  The body musculoskeletal tower is constantly stressed by gravity & a body tilted above an unstable pelvis incurs widely ranging chronic muscle spasm leading to varying densities of painful trigger points. The delicate female pelvis is more easily injured & women have an higher incidence of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (inherited trait) that contributes to pelvis instability.  Female pelvices are subject to varying intensities of permanent injury related to frequency of childbirth.  In both sexes, severity of symptoms is a function of musculoskeletal deconditioning & upper body mass borne by an unstable pelvis.  On a Pain Board at Quora.com a medical researcher discusses these dynamics, which are the true cause of fibromyalgia. 
Jun 9, 2013
Dr. Laurence Badgley
52 years experience General Practice
Provided original answer
In the course of examining numerous fibromyalgia patients over the years, I observed that many had unequal leg lengths and varying signs and symptoms of pelvic girdle instability (per Occupational Disabilities Guidelines).  In 2007, I attended the 6th Interdisciplinary Congress on Low Back and Pelvic Pain in Barcelona to present my study of pelvic girdle disorder.  At this meeting, I became aware of the work of Dr. Andry Vleeming and his discoveries about sacroiliac joint function and disorder.  I also met Dr. Vert Mooney (Professor Emeritus of Orthopedics at the University of California at San Diego) and studied his investigations of the sacroiliac joint.  The work of these men and my own clinical observations have taught me that the sacroiliac joint has a normal range of motion and is susceptible to injury more readily than was taught to me in medical school (1960's).  In 2009, I published (Practical Pain Management) my methods of diagnosis of sacroiliac joint dysfunction.  It is possible to prove that the joint is unstable.  An unstable sacroiliac joint causes the overlying body tower to lean to one side, which imposes significant mechanical stress on muscles, tendons, ligaments, and fascia of the upper body tower.  An unrecognized mechanical force parameter is body weight motivated by the ambient gravitational field.  I believe that fMRI and biochemical changes found in fibromyalgia sufferers are all secondary effects and not primary cause expressions.  Widely ranging trigger points are proven sites of ischemia and biochemical change (Dr. Shah), and are true peripheral neuropathic pain generators, which explain the pain of fibromyalgia.  Chronic fatigue, fibro fog, and depression all arise from interrupted sleep secondary to nocturnal pain.  People with unstable pelvises experience increased pain when they lie on the sleep surface because the ground force of the mattress is imposed upon the pelvic ring; traversing to the loosest part of the ring, the injured and subluxing sacroiliac joint, stressing ligaments of this joint.  Sacroiliac joint disorder is a joint movement disorder and is not an inflammatory disorder (per medical literature).  The Occupational Disabilities Guidelines present the methods of diagnosis of sacroiliac joint disorder.  The world literature is of consensus that MRI, CT, and nuclear scans are not helpful for diagnosing sacroiliac joint disorder.  I have published a booklet on Quora.com, on my Pain Board, wherein I present my findings and theories.  In October 2013, I am invited to the 8th Interdisciplinary Congress on Low Back and Pelvic Pain in Dubai to present a novel imaging technique I have invented to image sacroiliac joint subluxation disorder, which is a joint mobility disorder found in between 10 and 30 percent of people with chronic low back pain; as reported in the world medical literature. 
May 28, 2013
Dr. Edwin Perez
18 years experience Anesthesiology
NO: It can be an issue with some of the medications used to treat fibromyalgia but bladder issues need to be addressed.
Answered on Aug 11, 2015

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