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A 47-year-old member asked:

Is it unusual to get small blood clots after a tonsillectomy?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Michael Nordstrom
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 38 years experience
Not normal but...: No. Most people after a tonsillectomy experience no bleeding but it is more common in adults. A couple small clots are probably no reason for alarm, however anything more should be communicated to your surgeon. Sometimes it requires treatment. If it is alarming to you or recurrent you do need to talk with your doctor.

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Similar questions

A 43-year-old member asked:

Is it common to get small blood clots after having a tonsillectomy?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Christopher Watson
General Surgery 24 years experience
Yes: Small blood clots are common for up to a week. If large amounts of blood seek medical attention.
A 33-year-old member asked:

How to deal with blood clots after tonsillectomy?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Shawn Sarin
Vascular Surgery 23 years experience
Depends: Where are these blood clots located? Are they at the sight of tonsillectomy or have you been told you have deep venous thrombosis, either way he should contact your ENT surgeon and clear up this issue.
A 45-year-old member asked:

What can be done about a small blood clot?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Alvaro Aranda
Pulmonology 35 years experience
Depends: If too small & not interfering with the main stram circulatory flow, nothing to do if symptomatic blood thinners will be suffice. If not compromising your body will get the adjustment naturally as far as is not growing (blod thinners job).
A 38-year-old member asked:

How do you get blood clots? What in the blood decides to clot up?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Wayne Ingram
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Stasis: Circulating blood loves to "keep moving"!, it also is assisted by muscle contraction and movement and unfortunately a sedentary lifestyle or prolonged periods of inactivity facilitate the "clotting factors" in the blood activating causing clots that rarely "stay home" but travel to distant places like the lungs(pulmonary embolism).

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Last updated Sep 28, 2016

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