A 29-year-old female asked:
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would having a bottom tooth prematurely hit the left side of a top tooth cause soreness? only half the tooth gets sore. sometimes it even creates a tiny zap when eating but this is rare.

25 doctor answers
Dr. Stuart Hickerson
32 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: As long as the tooth did not get knocked out your symptoms should improve in a day or so. The attachments that connect the tooth to the gum can get stretched and that can cause soreness.
Answered on Jun 8, 2017
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Dr. Jayang Vora
48 years experience Dentistry
Yes: i would consult my dentist soon. May be it is cracked. Get X-ray done and checked by dentist. Good lucl
Answered on Apr 12, 2015
Dr. David May
Dr. David May answered
30 years experience Dentistry
It is not rare: If you are constantly putting too much pressure on that tooth it will aggravate the nerve and make it hypersensitive and always sore. The tiny zap could be nerve pain, especially if there is any crack in the enamel. Your dentist needs to make sure it does not hit too hard or the pain will continue and could even damage the nerve irreversibly.
Answered on Jun 8, 2017
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Dr. Elton Behner
37 years experience Dentistry
Yes: See your dentist for analysis and adjustment to your bite.
Answered on Jun 8, 2017
Dr. Alexei Buznikov
18 years experience Dentistry
Bite adjustment: Yous should see your dentist to have your bite checked and adjusted before it creates more issues.
Answered on Nov 27, 2017
Dr. Felicia Mata
25 years experience Cosmetic Dentistry
TMJ & Malocclusion: are contributory to this condition. Avoiding further trauma can help the nerve to recover. In the presence of bruxism and clenching habits, it can aggravate the condition and can lead from sensitivity to pulp necrosis.
Answered on Jun 8, 2017
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
36 years experience Pain Management
Premature contact: All tooth symptoms will be relieved after the occlusal adjustment by your dentist. Very common benign procedure.
Answered on Jun 8, 2017
Dr. Jonathan Engel
39 years experience Dentistry
See a dentist: You seem to have a very good sense of your bite. However, there are problems with premature contacts including excessive wear of the tooth and possible change in the bone and gum tissue around the teeth involved. See a dentist to see how this prematurity can be corrected
Answered on Jun 8, 2017
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Hmmm: Several possibilities here: The premature contact could be the result of a habit, a malocclusion, gum problem, nerve problem or something else. See a dentist for a clinical exam, x-rays, bite analysis and appropriate treatment if needed and as required.
Answered on Jun 8, 2017
Dr. Daniel Tamura
40 years experience Dentistry
Occlusal Problem: If your bite is off and a bottom tooth is hitting an upper tooth prematurely it can cause soreness. I would recommend you make an appointment with your dentist and have the area checked out. Your bite may just need to be adjusted or something else may be causing it. Prolonged premature hitting of the upper and lower tooth could lead to complications.
Answered on Jun 8, 2017
Dr. Louis Gallia
45 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Yes: Premature contacts between teeth are traumatic. Over time you can even loosen and lose teeth. See your DDS asap for evaluation.
Answered on Apr 13, 2015
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Yes: It is called exactly that... a prematurity. The fix could be quite simple and painless: a minor bite adjustment by your dentist. Have them take a look.
Answered on Jul 14, 2015
Dr. Arnold Malerman
53 years experience Orthodontics
Yes: Malocclusion can cause soreness. Teeth are designed to come together in a specific orientation. See Andrews Six Keys to Normal Occlusion. Any variation can cause excess force that results in pain. "Zap" may indicate a fracture or 2 dissimilar metal fillings coming into contact. See your Dentist for relief.
Answered on Sep 8, 2015
Dr. John DeWolf
40 years experience Dentistry
Occlusal trauma: This is a pretty common finding and if that's all there is causing your symptoms it is easily taken care of with a bite adjustment. Part of treatment is figuring out why your teeth may be shifting and addressing that issue as well. Good luck!
Answered on Oct 5, 2015
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
36 years experience Dentistry
Yes: Excessive forces on a tooth can make it sore. See a dentist bout this. You may need to have your bite adjusted or the tooth treated with a possible filling, crown or other procedure.
Answered on Oct 28, 2015
Dr. Robert Moretta
39 years experience Dentistry
Injury pain: A tooth can become bruised like any other part of your body. Teeth are held in the bone by a small ligament. When you bite on something too hard or something knocks your tooth, this ligament can become very sore. Try not to chew on the tooth. These types of injuries usually take a few days to feel good again. If it is not better in a couple of days, you should see a dentist.
Answered on Nov 19, 2015
Dr. Debra Rosenblatt
38 years experience Dentistry
See DDS: Go see your dentist and have a bite adjustment if needed. Let your dentist determine the need. What are the variables- did you have a new restoration- ie filling or crown recently placed? Do you grind your teeth? Discuss all with the dentist
Answered on Dec 5, 2015
Dr. Alan Zweig
45 years experience Dentistry
Yes: If you have one pair of teeth that are hitting first, or harder than the others, it is very possible for that to cause soreness. All of the forces of your jaws closing are directed to that one area. See your dentist for a definitive diagnosis.
Answered on Nov 28, 2017
Dr. Mark Miller
48 years experience Dentistry
High contact=ouch: YES! Recent studies found that light premature biting contact of teeth may change tooth sensations. These sensations can lead to hypersensitivity to hot and cold and pain when biting. Fracture lines in teeth that can expand and cause cracking of parts of the tooth and ultimately loss of the tooth.
Answered on Apr 16, 2016
Dr. Maryam Chiani
29 years experience Dentistry
Sore tooth: Absolutely, A premature contact (high) can cause inflammation and soreness of the tooth. Contact your dentist and have him adjust your bite. That should take care of it.
Answered on Jun 5, 2016
Dr. Earl Sandroff
43 years experience Dentistry
Could be cracked: Hitting a tooth or or teeth harder than they like can create discomfort. If you are getting a "zap" when you bite it could mean a toothe has a cracked or is cracking. I would suggest you go see you dentist and let them see. If there is no definitive answer or if they can duplicate your zap then they can treat the problem or continue to just watch it until it goes away or gets worse.
Answered on Oct 9, 2016
Dr. Keith Hollander
36 years experience Dentistry
Bite related pain: Yes, and this can be maddening. Its like if you get a filling and its too thick. See your dentist and the tooth can be subtlety be recontoured to allow them to meet comfortably, usually with having to be anesthetized
Answered on Nov 12, 2016
Dr. Gabriel Malouf
Specializes in Dentistry
Dental Appointment: The solution depends on the severity, timing, and duration of your symptoms. You could need anything from rest (nothing) to orthodontics & surgery; likely something in-between. See your dentist, find the answer and feel better.
Answered on Oct 10, 2017
Dr. Anthony Sharber
38 years experience Dentistry
Sometimes : Changes in occlusion can be related to a lot of causes. See your dentist to do a thorough investigation to find a lasting solution. Good luck.
Answered on Jun 7, 2017
Dr. Howard Schneider
34 years experience Pediatric Dentistry
Cracked tooth: The type of pain you describe could be caused by the tooth having a microscopic crack in it. When you bite down in a way that stresses the crack you feel it. At other times the tooth feels fine. This can be caused by your bite being off (malocclusion), previous trauma, or just normal wear and tear. Treatment may require an inlay or a crown. See your dentist for an evaluation.
Answered on Jun 8, 2017

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