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A 50-year-old member asked:

what to do if i can sleep?

6 doctor answers18 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michelle Zetoony
Sleep Medicine 18 years experience
Can't sleep: If it is night and you can sleep, the best thing to do is get out of bed and bedroom. Do some quiet activity like listening to music or reading. Do not turn on electronics or eat which can disrupt further. When tired, return to bed. If it is due to thoughts racing, put another thought or word in head to counteract and "bore" you back to sleep.
Dr. Divyansu Patel
Psychiatry 17 years experience
Sleep hygiene: Good sleep hygiene. Use bed for sleep only. No caffeine before bed and no big meal before bed. Listen to soft music. No tv or anything that is activating you mind. You should also see your doctor for medication option.
Dr. Shiroko Sokitch
Holistic Medicine 37 years experience
Sleep: <p>have you spent nights tossing and turning without being able to rest? Some people spend every night that way. I’m amazed at how many people tell me that they sleep only one to four hours a night.</p> <p>sleep is necessary for a healthy immune system, normal hormonal function, and recovery of your body and mind. Not sleeping causes your sleep hormones to become imbalanced, and as they get more imbalanced your sleep gets worse. it becomes a vicious cycle. lack of sleep can lower your serotonin and raise your cortisol levels. It can also contribute to fibromyalgia and other chronic pain problems.</p> <p>when trying to figure out what is causing the sleep problem, as always it is best to consider the simplest things first. Is there a dietary problem? Do you drink coffee or other caffeinated beverages too late in the day or too much? You may not be aware that they interfere with sleep. George was drinking a 12-pack of coke daily. He wondered why he had sleep problems and was always tired? Marissa was drinking a whole pot of coffee every day. Each of these things may not be a part of your awareness; because you do it daily, it’s not usually something that comes to mind. If you eat too late in the day or the meal is too heavy it can contribute to sleep problems. Gina has sensitivity to chocolate (of all things!) and can’t sleep on nights when she has eaten it.</p> <p>some people get busy at night and just don’t go to bed when they need to. If you don’t go to bed at the right time of night you can throw off your body’s natural sleep cycle. Try sticking to a pattern of going to bed regularly, your body will get used to it. Melatonin is the body’s sleep-wake cycle hormone. It seems to have a lot to do with changes in sleep patterns. When you travel to a different time zone melatonin is what causes the jet lag symptoms. By the same token, you can take melatonin if you have trouble with balancing your sleep wake cycle either while traveling or at home.</p> <p>hormonal changes that occur as people age can contribute to increasing sleep difficulty. Progesterone seems to be the main problem here. A low dose of natural Progesterone can help resolve it. Each person is different in her needs however and some people can’t sleep because of thyroid, estrogen, cortisol, or testosterone levels being off. We can use hormone tests to evaluate which hormones might be contributing to the problem.</p> <p>brain chemistry is another factor that contributes to sleep problems. Serotonin, gaba, epinephrine, and Dopamine are just some of the chemicals produced by the brain to affect sleep. We can measure these chemicals now with a simple urine test. Often supplements that include amino acids, vitamins, and herbs will help balance these chemicals naturally.</p> <p>sleep apnea is becoming more and more of a concern. As people who have sleep difficulties are getting tested, they are finding that they are not breathing well at night. There are sleep labs where this can be tested and diagnosed. If you have sleep apnea, a machine called a CPAP can help. It is quite loud and cumbersome so it could contribute to sleep disturbance itself but many of my patients find so much relief that the noise doesn’t bother them.</p> <p>don’t give up if you’ve tried a few different things for sleep without a solution, there are many options that could help. Angela had difficulty for years, and became addicted to sleep medication. When she came to me, we tested her hormones, and her neurotransmitters. It turned out that she was high in cortisol, low in progesterone, and low in serotonin. She began taking supplements to balance her chemistry. Over the course of a few months she was able to begin going off her medications. </p><div class="attribution">also posted <a href="http://www.Hthmc.Com/blog/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">on this blog</a></div>.
Dr. Marshall Nickel
Family Medicine 14 years experience
Insomnia: Insomnia can be due to many things...stress, inactivity, diet, depression, etc. I recommend exercising more during the day (more than 2 hours before bedtime though), consider some relaxation techniques, make sure to read about and follow good "sleep hygiene" (google it). See your doctor if not helping.
Dr.
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Sleep: Sleep disturbance can be due to stress, low mood, alcohol, nicotine an caffeine intake, snoring, ongoing pain , restless legs, poor sleep hygiene or other medical problems. Good sleep hygiene( see link below ), regular exercise would be a good start .Sleeping tablets are also an option but can be addicting. see doctor if nothing helps. http://www.healthnavigator.org.nz/health-a-z/i/insomnia/
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Question vague but: Insomnia has many causes, so an evaluation by a primary care doctor is needed. Getting rid of a problem causing insomnia will usually work, but sometimes no cause is found. Doctors may give medications to help fall asleep &amp; stay asleep. Depression, anxiety, hormonal imbalances, pain, medicines, ambient noise, tinnitus, jet lag, etc... all can cause insomnia. Sleep Medicine specialists may help.

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A 27-year-old member asked:

Will sleeping on the floor cause you have problems with sleep patterns?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine 17 years experience
No: As long as you are comfortable on the floor and can fall into deep sleep, sleeping on the floor shouldn't matter. There is nothing special about a bed except padding and support. But if you like a firm mattress anyway, there may not be much difference to sleeping on the floor if you put a little padding down.
A 41-year-old male asked:

Sweeting during sleep?

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Dr. John Van der Werff
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Cool body: Our bodies need to cool when we sleep and sweating is oneway for it to do so. You might try fewer blankets or sleeping in a cooler room to avoid the sweating.
A 34-year-old member asked:

How can I reset my sleeping schedule and get a good night's sleep?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michelle Zetoony
Sleep Medicine 18 years experience
Get up same time: Start by picking a regular wake up time and stick to it 7 days a week. This will help her nighttime sleep get on a particular schedule. Pick a wake up time typically between 6-8 hours after the goal bedtime. Follow some good sleep tips (national sleep foundation) and avoid extra medication, particularly caffeine and alcohol.
Kailua, HI
A 24-year-old male asked:

What can I substitute for sleep if sleeping is not an option?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Olivia Liao
Ophthalmology 31 years experience
There really is not: Any good substitute for sleep.
A member asked:

I.have sleeping issues in night comforatable sleep is not?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Laura Anissian
Internal Medicine 21 years experience
Sleep issues: How do you mean uncomfortable? pain? trouble staying asleep? falling asleep? Difficult to help you unfortunately as I do not understand your symptoms.

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