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A 25-year-old member asked:

What kind of help should be expected for a child who has dyslexia in school?

5 doctor answers11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bartholomew Vereb
Psychiatry 16 years experience
Depends: Each school district is different. However, in my experience, the more a parent fights for their child, the more services can be obtained. Dyslexia can be conquered. Parents are a child's #1 advocate.
Dr. Glen Elliott
Child Psychiatry 43 years experience
Varies: There are different forms of dyslexia that may require different approaches to treatment. Schools are supposed to have expertise in this area, and some do, but programs outside schools also can be helpful, e.g., fastforward, lindamood-bell, and others. The important point as a parent is not to give up. If what the school offers isn't helping, look for other evidence-based treatments.
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Pediatrics 50 years experience
Diagnosis first: Many neurodevelopmental disorders mimic dyslexia. So 1st step is to get a thorough evaluation. Once you know your child's strengths & weaknesses then you can plan properly form accommodations. The school accommodations are driven by the actual disabilities or deficiencies your child shows in evaluation. The accommodations are meant to ameliorate deficient areas to allow smooth learning.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics 50 years experience
If a child manifests: below-average reading decoding & slow reading progress, (s)he receives Response to Intervention Tier I, extra classroom instruction up to 8 wks. If no progress, (s)he receives RTI Tier II, small-group instruction up to 9 wks. If no progress, (s)he receives RTI Tier III,individual instruction up to 9 wks. If no progress, (s)he is evaluated for eligibility for an IEP, special education services.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics 50 years experience
Provided original answer
For a full explanation of RTI, see Http://www.rtinetwork.org/learn-about-rti/what-is-rti. Public schools now use "lower & slower progress", not an ability-achievement discrepancy, to define a learning disability. Parents can request a MultiDisciplinary Team Evaluation for eligibility for an Individualized Educational Plan at any time during the RTI process, but may not be granted one.
Aug 11, 2014
Dr. William Singer
Pediatric Neurology 51 years experience
Special ed reading: There are several reading programs available to assist children with gaining reading ability. The Orton Gillingham and Wilson reading programs are examples. Your child should get special education supports in addition to regular services.

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A 38-year-old member asked:

How can I help my child be very successful in and out of school?

1 doctor answer5 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Goldie
Pediatric Neurology 48 years experience
By example: Children learn by observing others. Serve as the best example of appropriate behavior. Point out to him the inappropriate behavior of others. Reward good behavior and help him understand his inappropriate behavior.

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Last updated May 4, 2016
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