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A member asked:

how fast of a turnaround can you have when having a crown installed? i'm going to need to get my first crown, and hope it's not going to take a bunch of visits. how fast can this be done?

4 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jonathan Scharf
Cosmetic Dentistry 49 years experience
With : With cerec it's one visit. The conventional method using an outside dental lab will probably be two visits with one to three weeks between visits.
Dr. David Duguid
Dentistry 29 years experience
One visit: Hi jule. In my office it's one visit regardless of the shape your tooth is in. It's about an hour to an hour and thirty minutes using the cerec system. With a good dentist, it's quite easy. Beware of a dentist who says it's not as good. With the cerec system you will get state of the art technology, a precise fit and great aesthetics. One visit, one shot, no goopy impressions or temps.
Dr. Brett Noorda
Dentistry 25 years experience
If your dentist doesn't have Cerec, it should take two visits--one about 45 min and a second 10-15min.
Mar 13, 2013
Dr. Robert Landman
Dentistry 32 years experience
Crown: Cerec 1 visit, using a lab 2 visits- usually. Also time depends upon how easily anesthesia gained, area of mouth being worked on , ie second molar teeth have limited access in most cases, so takes a little longer in order to preserve adjacent tissue... Also for dentists who dont have Cerec, your dentist can prearrange with lab to to get final crown in a shorter turnover time.
Dr. Paul Grin
Pain Management 36 years experience
Total of 2 hours: If a traditional crown requires up to 1-1.5 hours for the first appointment and a follow-up seating appointment of 20-30 minutes, CEREC crown takes a total of two hours of chair time.

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Similar questions

A 34-year-old member asked:

Will I get an injection when getting a crown?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jake Richards
Dentistry 12 years experience
Most of the time yes: When starting a crown it is rare that you would not need an injection at some point. If it is a traditional crown you will come back for it to be placed and then you are less likely to need an injection especially if it has had a root canal.
A 30-year-old member asked:

Can I get a crown if diabetic purely for cosmetic reasons?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Susan Wingo
Endocrinology 33 years experience
Talk to your doctor: In most cases, yes, cosmetic dental procedures can be done safely in people with diabetes. However, if your diabetes is not under good control, or you have certain complications, that could increase the risk of infection or other complications from the dental procedure. Your doctor can help you understand your particular situation.
A 41-year-old member asked:

Can you break a crown?

9 doctor answers25 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jonathan Hoffman
Dentistry 15 years experience
Yes: Occlusal forces can be very strong and often times are too much for the porcelain on crowns to withstand. Even though strong crown materials are getting more esthetic (eg zirconia), gold and all metal crowns usually stand up to strong chewing forces best.
A 34-year-old member asked:

What is better--gold or porcelein crown?

4 doctor answers12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Equal: They both are effective replacements for teeth. Porcelain tends to be a little more expensive (although that might change with the increase in the cost of gold) and is used for teeth that might show in the front of the mouth. Gold, which is easier to fabricate, is used more towards the rear of the mouth.
Dr. Jake Richards
Dentistry 12 years experience
Currently Gold crowns do cost more because of the lab costs but they are more durable than porcelain. They both have their place
Jul 10, 2012
A 29-year-old member asked:

What could cause an alignment problem after crowning?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Ruden
Dentistry 38 years experience
Crown too high: In most instances the crown is too high thus, causing your tooth alignment to become uncomfortable. This could easily be corrected by seeing your dentist to adjust the occlusal interference and thus, improving your alignment.

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Last updated Oct 3, 2016

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