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A member asked:

Can drinking sports drinks be bad for a child's teeth? our seven year old son plays soccer and likes to drink gatorade afterwards. he's developed a taste for it at non-sports times too, and i'm worried that it might be bad for his teeth.

3 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dentistry 40 years experience
Carbonated : Carbonated sodas are notorious for causing cavities due to he high sugar content and carbonic acid. Gatorade does not fall into that category, and i believe is more for rehydrating and replenishing electrolytes. I think the sugar content is pretty low, but you can check that out yourself. Make sure he has good oral hygiene habits, brushes twice a day, and visits his dentist regularly. With good habits like this he should keep cavity formation to a minimum.
Dr. Michael Wollock
Dentistry 29 years experience
Brooklyn : Brooklyn park, i am not in agreement with my respected colleague. Plain and simple, sports drinks are horrible for your sons teeth. I see more kids in my upper class location with this issue day after day. I have three kids myself, and they all play serious sports. Unless your son is competing in the olympics he does not need his electrolytes replenished. If i had gatoraid (or any other brand) market my practice as well they market their drinks, i wouldn't have any time to answer these questions. Your son is bathing his teeth in sugar for extended periods of time. This is a recipe for cavities. Stop the sports drinks, start the water, and get your dentist to take a pair of bitewing x-rays. Lets look between his teeth with these pictures to make sure you've contained this before significant cavities have set in. Hope this is helpful, michael i. Wollock, dmd, agd fellow dentistry at suburban square 610-649-0313 www.Dentistryatsuburbansquare.Com.
Dr. Harry Aronowitz
Orthodontics 44 years experience
We : We as dentists are more concerned with sticky foods that stay on the teeth for long periods of time. Snacks that are variations of dried fruit while seemingly nutritious, will cling to teeth and provide sugar to feed the bacteria that are always found there. A sports drink, even if it contains sugar will be washed away by saliva shortly after the last swallow. No question that plain water is best, but even kids will could use the replenishment of electrolytes after strenuous activity.

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Last updated Oct 3, 2016

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