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A 35-year-old member asked:

Does a lower back ache mean i am in labor?

7 doctor answers19 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jerome Yaklic
Obstetrics and Gynecology 29 years experience
No: It could especially if it is crampy and comes and goes every few minutes. However, it could be due to additional strain in your low back muscles due to your expanding belly and less postural support from your stomach (rectus) muscles. It could also be pain in your pelvis (si joints) from the hip bones "moving" to create more room for your baby to come out. If uncertain see your healthcare provider.
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
No: Not necessarily. Lover back pain is extremely common in pregnancy. It is due to the added weight and strain on the back. Labor typically has a pattern to it. Speak to your doctor.
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Internal Medicine 41 years experience
No: I had lower back pain on and off from about 20 weeks on and my doctor said it was totally normal. I started doing some stretches and it seemed to work.
Dr. Kathryn Mercer
Obstetrics and Gynecology 34 years experience
No: Full term labor is pretty hard to mistake. Early labor may be mild, but once it's in full swing, you should be able to tell. Put your hand on your belly and see if it is hardening with the pains. Another sign is rythmicity: contractions come and go, so the pain goes pretty much away and then returns.
Dr. Eugene Louie-Ng
Obstetrics and Gynecology 26 years experience
No: Not necessarily. If it seems like rhythmic cramping/tightening in the lower back or is associated with that sensation in the abdomen, then it may be labor. Braxton-hicks, or false labor pains, are irregular contractions/pains that are self limited and not regular in nature. Often it is better to have false alarms and be checked for labor than to completely ignore the symptoms.
Dr. Nicholas Fogelson
Specializes in Gynecology
No: One has to be a little more specific. Back pain that comes and goes may be contractions, while continuous back pain may not be. If there is concern its better to be evaluated by a physician.
Dr. Pam Yoder
Specializes in Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Not necessarily: There are many aches reported by pregnant women. Most providers want to hear about recurrent, severe or worrisome aches or pain. One of the more common complaints in late pregnancy is backache. It typically is due to changes in muscles, "swaying" of the spine (lordosis), pressure on the pelvis, etc. Low back pain can also be associated with early labor. If in doubt or high-risk, women should call.

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Similar questions

A 45-year-old member asked:

Lower back ache so what matterss?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Thomas Dowling
Orthopedic Spine Surgery 40 years experience
A good one: Generally it is not the mattress that will solve your back issues unless it only is occurring after you sleep on yours. Then, just a relatively firm one will do and regularly rotate it to keep it longer as they need to be replaced by 7-10 years or sooner if obese. Otherwise it is lifestyle that plays a role: regular exercise, weight control and avoiding smoking with good nutrition & sleep habits.
A 31-year-old member asked:

How to cure a lower back ache?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Walter Husar
Neurology 33 years experience
Cannot cure: You cannot really cure lower back pain; you could manage the discomfort and reduce muscle tension and then exercise to protect the rein jury of muscle.

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Last updated Sep 29, 2020

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