A 35-year-old female asked:
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my aunt has 2tumors left side lung which has spread to the lt hip bone. she just finished radiation to the hip and willbe starting chemo. is this normal treatment? why not start with treatment to the lung first? she is stage 4 lung cancer. are the docto

3 doctor answers
Dr. Addagada Rao
55 years experience General Surgery
To prevent fracture: Yes it is normal. Radiation was given to hip first to hip prevent fracture and for pain. Discuss with oncologist with your aunt permission will explain the plan of treatment and prognosis.
Answered on Jun 5, 2019
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
46 years experience Radiation Oncology
Once NSCLC: Spreads, there is no cure. The goal is to treat symptomatic areas to provide comfort. We are encouraged to incorporate palliative care (experts in symptom control) and even get a hospice assessment -- focus on home services, help, equipment, support. A good idea to maximize comfort when cure is not possible.
Answered on Sep 18, 2012
Dr. Carlos Encarnacion
34 years experience Medical Oncology
XRT can be first: I assume your aunt has non-small cell lung cancer which usually does not respond quickly to chemo. If the lesions in the bone are causing pain or are at risk for fracture, we will often give radiation first (usually 10 days) to deal with the acute problem first. Then we give chemo to address the rest. Best wishes.
Answered on Oct 26, 2012
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