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A 36-year-old member asked:

Can bulemics get cancer of the esophagus.?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology 47 years experience
Reflux: Smoking and alcohol excess are risks for esophageal cancer. Bulemia, induced vomiting, is not an identified risk.
Dr. Matthew Hennig
Thoracic Surgery 19 years experience
Sure...: Anyone can develop esophageal cancer. The main factors that seem to contribute to its development are: -reflux disease and barrett's esophagus -alcohol use -smoking -alcohol and smoking together may actually add to the effects that they would otherwise provide alone. -obesity -male gender -age over 60.

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A 40-year-old member asked:

What are the symptoms of getting cancer of the esophagus?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brett Kalmowitz
Gastroenterology 22 years experience
Several: Difficulty swallowing with food and liquids getting stuck. Unintentional weight loss. Anemia. Black stools. Unfortunately at times there are no symptoms. Stop smoking!
A 35-year-old member asked:

I think i may have cancer of the esophagus. How do I get it checked?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology 47 years experience
Common concern: Is difficulty swallowing, particularly with meat or doughy foods like a bagel, but usually it is there all the time. An esophageal spasm can mimic this, and be quite uncomfortable. You may need imaging and endoscopy. Go to a center that has endosopic ultrasoound. I've had spasms and have been scoped twice. Go and be sure.
A 48-year-old member asked:

Could teens get esophagus cancer?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Eugene Ahn
Specializes in Integrative Medicine
Extremely rare: The scientific literature describes only case reports (individual cases) of esophagus cancer in teenage years, so it is possible but extremely unlikely. Factors which might increase risk include family history, certain nutritional deficiencies not likely to occur in the us or toxic exposures (lye, n-nitrosamines, etc).

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Last updated Nov 26, 2012

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