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A 41-year-old member asked:

how important is a nuclear stress test for type b wpw syndrome?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. George Younis
Internal Medicine 23 years experience
Somewhat: Stress testing, i.e. Exercising while hooked up to an ekg, can be important to see if the extra heart fiber that causes this condition stops conducting at higher heart rates. The nuclear portion, which evaluates for ischemia or lack of blood flow, is not very important.
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
Cardiology 51 years experience
Nuclear: If your doctor is concerned that a tachycardia with WPW could cause an ischemic event in you. The doc might order the nuclear stress test to evaluate whether ischemic potential is present. The nuclear images don't particularly bear info on the bypass tract(s).

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A 33-year-old member asked:

Nuclear stress test for type b WPW syndrome?

1 doctor answer5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bennett Werner
Cardiology 44 years experience
Not helpful: A nuclear stress test will provide information regarding the health of your coronary arteries which have nothing to do with wpw. If a stress test is indicated, it's independent of wpw. If WPW is the issue, a stress test will provide no useful information.

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Last updated Jun 10, 2014

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