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A 22-year-old male asked:

doc is it true that hepatitis b can be treated already?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Lages
Rheumatology 68 years experience
-No: There is no actual treatment for hepatitis B per se except dietary and supportive measures. However, there is treatment for post exposure to Hepatitis B in the form of giving hepatitis B immune globulin and vaccination against hepatitis B.

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A 21-year-old member asked:

Can there be complications with hepatitis a if I have cancer?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Maybe (so get vacc.): Although the great majority of normal, healthy people recover from hepatitis a infection without any long term problems, there are always an unlucky few who have very serious symptoms. A few people die each year from liver failure in the U.S., due to hepatitis a infection. A person with cancer and a weakened immune system or damage to the liver may have more complications from hepatitis a virus.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Can there be complications with hepatitis a if I have diabetes?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Shabbir Hossain
Internal Medicine 16 years experience
Medication related: Some diabetic meds are metabolized or work in the liver. If the hepatitis a affects your liver function, then it's ability to process those medications will be altered.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Is hepatitis b prevalent in the us?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lance Stein
Specializes in Hepatology
Yes: It is prevalent in certain sub-populations such as certain immigrant groups and alaskan natives. There are over 1.25 million hepatitis b carriers in the United States and it is much more common in foreign born immigrants to the us who come from countries with a high prevalence.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Can there be complications with hepatitis b if I am an alcoholic?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lance Stein
Specializes in Hepatology
Yes: All patients with chronic liver diseases need to be counseled to stop drinking. Alcohol will cause the liver damage from hepatitis b and hepatitis C to become more rapid. Two liver problems are always worse than one.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Where in the world is hepatitis b more prevalent?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lance Stein
Specializes in Hepatology
Asia, Eastern Europe: From the who website: hepatitis b is endemic in china and other parts of asia where 8-10% of the adult population are chronically infected. High rates of chronic infections are also found in the amazon and the southern parts of eastern and central europe. In the middle east and indian sub-continent, an estimated 2% to 5% of the general population is chronically infected.

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Last updated Feb 22, 2015

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