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A 30-year-old member asked:

is it possible for you to have the stretchy mucus and not ovulate?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Melissa Yates
Fertility Medicine 18 years experience
Ovulation: Since looking at mucus is a more subjective measure of ovulation, it is difficult to say for sure. You might consider a home ovulation predictor kit.

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Similar questions

A 36-year-old member asked:

Can the thick stretchy mucus always mean ovulation?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Ovulation predictor: It is just one possible sign. There are a number of possible signs of ovulation. Vaginal discharge can increase in amount & become watery to stretchy. It has been described as a “raw egg white ” consistency. You may have an increased libido. Body basal temperature increases. The cervix becomes softer and higher. Breasts may be tender. About 20% of women experience ovulation pain.
Dr. Les Gurwitt
Dr. Les Gurwitt commented
Obstetrics and Gynecology 56 years experience
Extra estrogen on or around time of ovulation causes "spinnbarkeit"-mucous of cervix that can stretch
May 28, 2013
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Provided original answer
Good info.
May 28, 2013

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Last updated May 30, 2016

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