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Auburn, WA
A 33-year-old female asked:

would both brain mri and lumbar puncture be needed to diagnose ms? have l side numbness, spasms around l chest, l leg spasms, t3/t4 lesion on cord foun

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Walter Husar
Neurology 33 years experience
MS Diagnosis: Unfortunately there is not one test that can conclusively diagnose multiple sclerosis. There has to be multiple lesions attributable to the white matter of the central nervous system separated by space and time. Diagnosis is usually made with a combination of history, clinical. Examination and diagnostic testing. Mri usually demonstrates lesions and spinal tap demonstrates immune activity in cns.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 52 years experience
Possible MS: If you have a lesion in the spinal cord but not found in brain, the next approach would be to use spinal fluid, looking at possible oligoclonal bands and other immunological parameters. If negative, repeat brain MRI in 6 months. The sooner this can be confirmed, the sooner meds can start which will eventuate in control and protection. Would start vit d supplementation now, in any case.

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A 22-year-old member asked:

I've had severe neck, back, and throat pain for over a week and occasional headaches and vomit. Dr said its only post nasal drip. What is going on?!

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Dr. Luis Villaplana
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?: I don't know without examine you but i doubt all those symptoms are due to just postnasal drip. Ge another opinion please.
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A 33-year-old member asked:

Would a pinched sciatic nerve cause pain in wrists and numbness/tingling in hands or feet?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ken Starnes
Dr. Ken Starnesanswered
General Practice 9 years experience
Feet maybe, hands no: The sciatic nerve runs from the gluteal region (your rear end) down the back of your leg, then branches to innervate the back of the thigh and leg as well as the outer part of the lower leg and then parts of the feet. An injury may cause those symptoms there, as well as problems with motion. The major nerves that serve the hands are the radial, ulnar and median.
Dr. Ken Starnes
Dr. Ken Starnes commented
General Practice 9 years experience
Provided original answer
Any time. Best of luck.
Jan 16, 2012
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Westerville, OH
A 23-year-old female asked:

I am being treated for chlamydia zithromax 250mg twice today and once daily for the next 4 days one of the symptoms I ve been experiencing is lower back pain which I thought might be associated with PID will the zithromax treat PID or should I schedule an

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Adam Newman
Obstetrics and Gynecology 29 years experience
Wrong dose: The way you are taking the zithromax is not the dosing for chlamydia - for that you need to take 4 250mg tablets at once. That's it. Call your doctor and check out why they prescribed it the way you are taking it.

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Last updated Sep 6, 2014

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