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treatment for central retinal artery occlusion

A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Avi Bitton
41 years experience Ophthalmology
Medical evaluation: Most importantly, you must get an immediate, comprehensive medical evaluation to find possible causes and treat them. This is not a purely ocular prob ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Randall Wong
32 years experience Ophthalmology
Not Correctible: A central retinal artery occlusion is not correctable. While the vision lost is usually permanent, some improvement may occur with time. Be on ... Read More
Dr. Damien Luviano
17 years experience Ophthalmology
Not correctable : Occlusion of the vessel can occur from a plaque, clot, emboli, irregular heart beat, etc. Eye can worsen (glaucoma/pain) even if vision improves some ... Read More
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Dr. Richard Scartozzi
18 years experience Retinal Surgery
No good treatments: There are no scientifically proven treatments. If you have one though, you must be worked up for embolic disease (carotid ultrasound and echocardiogra ... Read More
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A 21-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Leaming
Specializes in Emergency Medicine
Eye vessel blockage: If the central retinal artery gets occluded, painless loss of monocular vision is the usual presenting symptom and there is complete loss of vision in ... Read More
Dr. Theodore Wu
21 years experience Ophthalmology
Retina: This is a blocked blood vessel in the eye...Basically a small ischemic stroke.
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
18 years experience Retinal Surgery
See a retina special: A blocked retinal artery (usually from an embolus that traveled from somewhere else in the body like the carotid artery or the heart) can lead to visi ... Read More
A 42-year-old female asked:
Dr. Nestor Del rosario
33 years experience Addiction Medicine
Yes: We have what is called paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and they are more concerning as if not found and diagnosed, they can also cause embolic strokes.
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eric Weisman
35 years experience Neurology
Difficult to answer: If one distinguishes between anterior and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy this is easier to answer as the former is almost always caused by giant ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Matheson Harris
15 years experience Ophthalmology
Related issues: Optic neuropathy is a generic term referring to damage to the optic nerve from any cause including trauma, decreased blood flow, or genetic disease. ... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jon Fishburn
29 years experience Ophthalmology
Nerve vs. artery : Arterial occlusion generally from embolus, inflammatory, which affects the inner retinal lining of the eye. Ischemic optic neuropathy is due to blocka ... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tim Conrad
33 years experience Ophthalmology
Different eye part: Ischemic optic neuropathy is a stroke to the optic nerve and retinal artery occlusion is a stroke to the retina.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Harry Bernstein
36 years experience Ophthalmology
Hereditary tort.: No it cannot be "cured". It is,usually not a cause for concern, although some rare conditions should be checked for. See your ophthalmologist.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Jarstad
36 years experience Ophthalmology
No. It is inherited: Hereditary conditions are by definition genetically inherited. However recent research into stem cell treatment of inherited conditions of the eye ... Read More

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