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sores on tongue after eating

A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Green
9 years experience Dentistry
Avoid those foods: Your complaint is very common and the simple answer is to avoid those foods! canker sores occur as a reaction to some types of allergens, such as cit ... Read More
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3 thanks
Dr. Charles Kattuah
23 years experience Dentistry
Unknown: Canker sores or apthous ulcers are most often attributed to an autoimmune reaction of the mucosa. The causative agents can vary among persons and ther ... Read More
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1 thank

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A 18-year-old member asked:
Dr. Justin Nelson
16 years experience Pediatric Dentistry
Yes/no: Yes = due to long term chewing on it can cause a calluses (whitish) which in turn can become precancerous by definition. No = No worries because I ha ... Read More
A 52-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Loury
39 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Not sure: I would be concerned if the twitching gets worse the longer you eat, improves with rest and recurs when eating is resumed. Same with speech and swall ... Read More
Dr. Behram Dalal
31 years experience Dentistry
There might be: Certain foods or spices you might bf sensitive to. Try to see what foods trigger the twitching. Consider consulting with your physician or dentist.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Lester Thompson
33 years experience Pathology
Just a sensation: While there are pain sensors on the tongue, certain foods may accidentally "fire" the nerves that carry pain. So, it may be that very spicy or bitter ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Paul Carter
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Allergy: Might be food allergy or possibly "oral allergy syndrome" which is related to pollen allergies but caused by some raw fruit and vegetables.
A 59-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
44 years experience Pathology
Angioedema: This is either food allergy or angioedema. Your physician knows how to work up you, and it may not be too soon for you to start carrying an Epinephrin ... Read More
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A 40-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Tongue ulcers: Following eating acidic foods could be a form of food allergy, canker sores (aphthous ulcers) initiated by the high acidity or trauma.
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A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. Nathan Pfister
12 years experience Dentistry
Food allergy: I'd bet food allergy. You ought to see dr who will review food allergies and sensitivities. We like immunolabs test.
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1 thank
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. SCOTT HARWOOD
45 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Allergic Reaction: Sounds like it's probably an allergic reaction to something you ate. An antihistamine like Benadryl (diphenhydramine) would be helpful if it is mild. ... Read More
A 48-year-old female asked:
Dr. Yale Kanter
61 years experience Ophthalmology
Sleep disorder: The coating in the morning can be explained by mouth breathng and the effect of dryness on the tongue. It might be adviseable to see if you have slee ... Read More
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1 thank

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