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pacifier

A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Take Time & think: Some kids don't seem to value a pacifer & won't miss it if its gone.Others are variably attached & parents need to be creative & end use in stages. Fi ... Read More
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A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. Steven Neish
37 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
No rules: There has been much arguing over the years about pacifiers. In the end, though, there are no rules. When you say baby, i assume that you really mean ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
When baby tosses it : Some babies show no real interest in pacifiers & will not miss it if you don't bring it along. Others have a tight self soothing bond & should be left ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Thad Woodard
Specializes in Pediatrics
Few if any cons: In general infants are pacified by sucking and a pacifier can really help infants that are calmed by sucking, in my experience pacifiers rarely interf ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Maurice Lindly
37 years experience Dentistry
Maybe. See below.: I assume you mean in children. The use of a pacifier to stop children from grinding is not what i would recommend. Grinding at night can result from s ... Read More
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A 39-year-old male asked:
Dr. Lois Freisleben-Cook
40 years experience Pediatrics
NO: Do not give a used pacifier to a newborn. It carries a risk of introducing bacteria and fungal elements to an immature immune system. Most hospitals ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. TED FEDER
Dr. TED FEDER answered
39 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Not in a Baby: Using a pacifier before any teeth are present will not affect future occlusion. Pacifiers or thumb sucking over a long time with teeth present can ca ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Arnold Malerman
52 years experience Orthodontics
Hygiene: May be unrelated. May also be from saliva accumulating on lips/cheeks. Make sure you gently and frequently wash child's face with warm water to remo ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Less than thought: A pacifier is often falsely blamed for a high palate or tooth protrusion.The palate is genetic as is some of dental alignment. A thumb sucker puts mor ... Read More
A 39-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Juchau
32 years experience Family Medicine
Pacifiers: Yes please! Pacifiers are wonderful in my opinion. They satisfy babies need to suck, they sooth baby, they help mom and dad. They don't hurt teeth. ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Anthony LaBarbera
27 years experience Pediatrics
Yes: The same as using a pacifier. It can cause rounding of the top front teeth and an over bite.
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Karsant
38 years experience Dentistry
Thumb sucking: It is normal and i would not worry unless it goes beyond two years. Children can change the shape of their palate with thumb sucking. Don't stress it ... Read More
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A 53-year-old female asked:
Dr. Rhonda Simons
14 years experience Family Medicine
Thumb Sucking: Adult thumb-sucking can definitely be tied to an anxiety disorder. In fact, the thumb sucking ; pacifier use could cause you to swallow significant ai ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Laura Webb
12 years experience Pediatrics
Start weaning at 1: Start weaning the bottle at 1 year or a little before. Once your child is drinking cow's milk always put the milk in a cup, not bottle. Then, just u ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Douglas Fronzaglia ii, do, ms
20 years experience Geriatrics
Not really: Just make sure to wash the pacifier often.
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A member asked:
Dr. Michael Coogan
47 years experience Pediatrics
Yes: Swaddling, or snuggly wrapping babies, is an ancient practice that has been shown to calm babies by lowering their heart rates and decreasing self-sta ... Read More
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A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Oscar Novick
57 years experience Pediatrics
Bottle feeding : When to stop bottle feeding is your decision.If you wish you can start weaning your child at 7-10 months.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Klugman
45 years experience Dentistry
Usually not: A pacifier can pull the upper front section of teeth forward. If it is discontinued before age 2, those teeth will move back.
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A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Katharine Cox
44 years experience Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Device: There is a device from Almeda that simulates breast feeding that may work. All the best.
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sathish Adigopula
19 years experience Pediatrics
8m-9m: Usually around 8-9 m. Few babies sleep 5-6 hrs starting from 4 m of age and some babies have a night feed till 12 m of age.
A member asked:
Dr. Marcus Degraw
21 years experience Pediatrics
Yes: There is truly a lot of variables in this question - i.e. How much does the child use a pacy of suck their thumb per day, but for the most part these ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stuart Janousky
36 years experience Pediatrics
Feeding: I recommend getting rid of the bottle before the second birthday. I generally say anywhere from 1 to 2 years is a good age, Most of my patients seem t ... Read More
A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Melissa Gowans
20 years experience Pediatrics
Thumb sucking: Babies tend to put their thumbs in their mouth…their fingers too. As they get older they like to put anything they can hold into their mouths. It's al ... Read More

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