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inhibitory

A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mary Efremov
42 years experience in Internal Medicine
More info needed: Many medicines work by inhibiting or blocking a substance.. So we need more information for a serious answer.

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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
Impulse control: Impulse control.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Guy DaSilva
34 years experience in Preventive Medicine
Excitatory: Histamine is actually classified as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain responsible for the sleep wake cycle. Too much of it can keep you awa ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Susan Uhrich
35 years experience in Psychiatry
Our own fears: Of being embarrassed or hurt.
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1 thank
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ralph Morgan Lewis
37 years experience in Family Medicine
Both, indirectly: Glutamine is a major precursor of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter, & of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), the most potent inhibit ... Read More
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1 thank
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
32 years experience in Anesthesiology
No: At this time, there is no evidence to suggest this. As one may imagine, few if any studies have been performed in humans to look for this.
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Barry Pierce
38 years experience in Psychiatry
No: Effexor (venlafaxine) blocks serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake receptors.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Haupt
48 years experience in Psychiatry
Just one type: "selective" in this case refers to the fact that the previous generation of antidepressants, the tricyclics, worked on all 3 of the neurotransmitters ... Read More
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1 thank
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shaym Puppala
24 years experience in Internal Medicine
Evidence says not: One meta-analysis* (a study pooling results from multiple other studies) suggested that reboxetine is ineffective & may be harmful. *(eyding d et.A ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Strattera (atomoxetine): Inhibition is the opposite of stimulation, so the effectiveness is reduced.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
TCA/SSRI: Both are, depending on what they are prescribed for. The difference is in tolerability & side-effects.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Koenigsberg
41 years experience in Psychiatry
Most newer ones: Most of the newer antidepressant medications affect specific neurotransmitters. Each does it slightly differently, accounting for the different respo ... Read More
A 40-year-old male asked:
Dr. Edward Kuhnley
44 years experience in Child Psychiatry
Yes. Great Question!: The Amino Acid glutamate plays a central role in nitrogen metabolism & participates in multiple biochemical pathways. Disease examples: autoantibodie ... Read More
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1 thank
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Dexilant (dexlansoprazole): This is a proton pump inhibitor for treating gerd. It does not contain MAO inhibitor.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glen Elliott
42 years experience in Child Psychiatry
Still unclear: We know what they do--block reuptake at the neuron. But, why that helps with depression and anxiety, among other disorders, remains unclear. Especia ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marc Zimmermann
21 years experience in Psychiatry
Depression: These medications are usually a first line medication for depression although they have other uses.
A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Philip Kern
42 years experience in Endocrinology
Neurotransmitters: Neurotransmitters are not easily classified into inhibitory and stimulatory. It depends on where they are acting.
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1 thank
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Austina Cho
25 years experience in Psychiatry
Not safe: GABA antagonists are not routinely prescribed for GABA A receptor upregulation. The main one flumazenil (clonazepam) is used for overdoses from benzod ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Reidbord
35 years experience in Psychiatry
Yes: Triavil is an old medicine that is not often used anymore. It's a combination of Amitriptyline and perphenazine. The latter is a neuroleptic (antips ... Read More
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Szawaluk
30 years experience in Cardiology
Generally : Well tolerated. Common side effects potentially include: dizziness, low blood pressure, headache, diarrhea, fatigue and elevated potassium to name a f ... Read More
A 34-year-old male asked:
Dr. Zafar Khan
57 years experience in Urology
Yes: It is interesting that it is called " stimulation", in fact it inhibits the neuron depending upon the degree of stimulation applied. For example the i ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience in Neurology
I'm curious: Why do you believe you need to take medication that claims to affect dopamine, especially OTC remedy which will NOT cross the brain-blood barrier? If ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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