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how do i recover from shin splints while still continuing to train for my marathon

A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Cunnar
27 years experience Family Medicine
That's tough: I'm assuming this was for the chicago marathon. Rest is key. To keep training you can do training in a pool, to take the strain off the lower leg. ... Read More
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Dr. Mark Galland
32 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
X-training benefits: Cross training is a good way to increase overall fitness and prevent overuse injuries (such as "shin splints) in specific body regions. Using various ... Read More
Dr. John Thaler
41 years experience Prosthodontics
Slowly: You cannot heal these fast. They usually result from overtraining or trying to do too much too fast. Also can occur if changing running surfaces and s ... Read More

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A 20-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ario Kiarash
27 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Rest: Shin splints or tibial stress syndrome heals at a different rate in different people. You should avoid running for the next 6 weeks. If you have acc ... Read More
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1 thank
Dr. John Thaler
41 years experience Prosthodontics
Depends: You may take Ibuprofen for the imflammation and pain as needed. Avoid hills totally. Stay on same surface -- not road then grass, or indoor basketball ... Read More
A 20-year-old female asked:
Dr. Blake Miller
13 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Shin splints: I'd be careful with your workouts. You may have a tibial stress fracture. You may want an x-ray and a potential bone scan.
Dr. Bradly Shollenberger
36 years experience Podiatry
Orthotics: Shin splints are often fatigue of the lower leg muscles as they struggle to control the foot. The latest trend in running shoes is ultraflexible and ... Read More
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Dr. Steven Sheskier
39 years experience Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgery
Back off on training: True shin splints are a form of periostitis, inflamation of the muscles where they are attached to the bone.They must be distinguished from stress rea ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Joy Jackson
19 years experience Family Medicine
Shin : Shin splints is an inflammation of the ligaments and surrounding tissue that runs along the bone in the front of your lower leg (the tibia). This is c ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Christopher Hajnik
18 years experience Orthopedic Reconstructive Surgery
Rest: Rest, activity modification, otc pain meds, and ice are your best options.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bertrand Kaper
29 years experience Orthopedic Reconstructive Surgery
Variable recovery: Shin splints refer to inflammation at the point of muscle attachment along the anterior shin. Recovery is dependent on the individual and influenced ... Read More
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mak Yousefpour
18 years experience Podiatry
Yes: unfortunately shin splints are difficult to "cure". Reduce running distance and also avoid running hills. Going up and down really applies a lot of pr ... Read More
A 18-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Roman
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Need rest. : The pain is telling you the bone is damaged and needs rest. If you continue to compete and push the issue could suffer problems down the road. Rest ... Read More
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1 thank
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Victor Khabie
30 years experience Sports Medicine
Rest, ice, stretcg: Need to decrease activity level, stretch, ice, nsaids. Can take months to heal.
A 20-year-old female asked:
Dr. Sheila Liewald
14 years experience Holistic Medicine
Footwear: Look into really changing up footwear and cross training. Try a good sports massage therapist and or acupuncture. It will take 3-6 sessions spaced wee ... Read More
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2 thanks

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