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Duragesic

A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Sacher
32 years experience in Pain Management
Many side effects: Depends what reason you are prescribed the narcotic. If you have chronic severe pain, you may just have pain relief, possibly sedated, somnolent, poss ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Sacher
32 years experience in Pain Management
Varies: Varies from pharmacy to pharmacy.
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2 thanks
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rita Agarwal
34 years experience in Anesthesiology
Talik to your doctor: Monitor for side effects and pain.
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Tyson
38 years experience in Pain Management
Stopping Duragesic (fentanyl): Either a slow taper or abrupt discontinuation with experiencing opiate withdrawal are the two basic methods. Unless there is some reason to stop abrup ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Prem Gupta
47 years experience in neurology
Reasonably effective: Let your pain management physician and your self decide about this option itching at site and premature falling off from site are some times problems.
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vikram Patel
36 years experience in Pain Management
Strongest opiate: Fentanyl is the strongest followed by dilaudid, Percocet and narco. However, over time every opiate produces tolerance and withdrawals if stopped abru ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tom Harrington
41 years experience in Internal Medicine
Duragesic (fentanyl) patch: Upsides- for chronic pain and gives you steady state levels that are not seen with short acting opiods. Downsides- very potent. Not helpful for ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Gross
72 years experience in Anesthesiology
Fentanyl online: No, the delivery and integrity of the patch is of paramount importance and many people tamper with these and can alter sometimes fatally the delivery ... Read More
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9 thanks
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Sacher
32 years experience in Pain Management
Pain docs: Pain specialist.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
48 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Better for what???: Opioids may be all that a person needs for acute pain (broken bone, sprained ankle) but is NEVER the primary treatment of ANY chronic pain. Each of t ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Orrin Ailloni-Charas
28 years experience in Anesthesiology
Hydrocodone: Is a narcotic. It is a synthetic derived from codeine.
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rita Agarwal
34 years experience in Anesthesiology
Different: They are both pain relievers but are different drugs.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Newton
18 years experience in Pain Management
Yes: This is not an easy conversion but most conversions show oxycodone to be much stronger.
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1 thank
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Marx
47 years experience in Pain Management
No & Maybe: Actiq shouldn't be used for non-cancer pain. Tolerance develops rapidly because of the rapid, intense effect. This results in the need for higher and ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vicki Levine
40 years experience in Dermatology
No: This is only availsble by prescription.
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jay Rosenfeld
31 years experience in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
No best: There is no such thing as a "best" medicine that can be generalized. Everyone needs individual assessment. Discuss with your doctor. It is concerning ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Sacher
32 years experience in Pain Management
Can work well: Yes Duragesic patches can work well. It depends on what dosage you are prescribed. One problem with the patch is building up a tolerance to continuous ... Read More
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5 thanks
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Evans Prieston
43 years experience in Pharmacology
Oxycontin: Absolutely. There is no question....It is possible, even easy to get addicted to oxycontin. These drugs are intended for short term use because of t ... Read More
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A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Gofeld
31 years experience in Pain Management
Yes: As any opiod Avinza (morphine) has significant risk for addiction.
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Sacher
32 years experience in Pain Management
Controlled substance: You have to be prescribed the narcotic by a pain specialist.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rita Agarwal
34 years experience in Anesthesiology
All different: They have different uses and modes on administration. Hydrocodone and oxycodone are taken by mouth and last about 3-4 hours. Methadone takes several h ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Einar Ottestad
18 years experience in Pain Management
Oxy: Oxycodone is generally thought to be a bit more potent than morphine. Usual ratios on a mg basis is 3 mg morphine = 2 mg oxycodone. That stated differ ... Read More
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Tyson
38 years experience in Pain Management
Morphine patches: There are no transdermal formulations of morphine currently available to my knowledge. Both morphine and Actiq (fentanyl) are potent opiates that can ... Read More
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A member asked:
Dr. Mark Gujer
25 years experience in Anesthesiology
By itself?: No.. But it can make your eating habits poor from lack of attention.
A 62-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
Minimal: Fentanyl is very short acting and instantly reversible (with Narcan (naloxone) IV) - thus it's an extremely safe drug to use under medical supervision ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Gross
72 years experience in Anesthesiology
Withdrawal effects: The withdrawal effects of a medication, any medication is often the opposite of the therapeutic effects. In this case, diarrhea, anxiety, wakefullnes ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 62-year-old male asked:
Dr. Andrew Oh
Dr. Andrew Oh answered
16 years experience in Pain Management
Adjuvant therapy: There is good evidence that shows anti-epileptic medications, Gabapentin and Lyrica (pregabalin) specifically, can work in conjunction with opioids in ... Read More
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A 35-year-old male asked:
Dr. Martin Morell
28 years experience in Rheumatology
This: Combo could cause respiratory depression and even death, go to pain doctors to look for options. Good luck!
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1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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Personalized answers
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Talk to a doctor
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