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Dermatosclerosis

A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Venkata Chilakapati
22 years experience Cardiology
Dermatosclerosis: An autoimmune disease that affects the blood vessels and connective tissue; fibrous connective tissue is deposited in the skin.

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A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
48 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Bad disease: Scleroderma is a progressive disease that affects the skin and connective tissue (including cartilage, bone, fat, and the tissue that supports the ner ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Morris Westfried
45 years experience Dermatology
Thickened skin: It is a thickening of the skin usually on the upper back and back of the neck. More common in diabetics and heavier people. Treatment is difficult as ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Morris Westfried
45 years experience Dermatology
Diabetes: It is associated with diabetes and usually involves the back of neck. It is difficult to treat although to is often asymptomatic.
A 25-year-old member asked:
Dr. Joseph Eastern
43 years experience Dermatology
Clarify: There is no specific disease called "dermatosclerosis." do you mean scleroderma? If so, treatment options include drugs such as penicillamine, immuno ... Read More
A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Dermatosclerosis: Dermatosclerosis = scleroderma = autoimmune disease affecting connective tissue & blood vessels. It causes skin to thicken asymmetrically due to ... Read More
A 21-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pierre Moeser
Specializes in Rheumatology
Hard skin: Scleroderma literally means "hard skin." it is a connective tissue disease that primarily involves the skin which becomes fibrotic (hardened). Changes ... Read More
7
7 thanks
A 21-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jackie Lam
16 years experience Family Medicine
Anyone: Anyone can get it, but it's more common amongst female.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pierre Moeser
Specializes in Rheumatology
Unknown: The precise cause is unknown but there is a genetic predisposition in certain individuals. Viruses, certain drugs, and environmental factors have been ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 21-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alain Ades
38 years experience Gastroenterology
Scleroderma: There is no treatment. The symptoms can be helped by various medications. Bu medical center has the best program in scleroderma research.
2
2 thanks

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