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cymbalta and alcohol use

A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
Not a good idea: Taking cymbalta (duloxetine) and drinking alcohol can increase risk of liver damage.

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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
Please don't.: Taking alcohol with Cymbalta (duloxetine) can increase risk of liver damage.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Meredith Moroff
19 years experience in Psychiatry
Maybe: Alcohol and Cymbalta (duloxetine) are both metabolized by the liver. That means when you use them both, the alcohol stays in your system longer than i ... Read More
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1 thank
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Matt Vukin
15 years experience in Psychiatry
Variable: Alcohol can potentiate side effects of your medications. This is might effect one person more severely than another. The combo of alcohol and Cymbal ... Read More
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40 thanks
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
39 years experience in Psychiatry
No, it is not: Both are central nervous system depressants. They can both suppress the breathing centers in your brain. You could get super drunk, uncoordinated, bla ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gregory Seagraves
16 years experience in Pharmacology
Alcohol and Cymbalta (duloxetine): An occasional drink may be ok. However, frequent drinking while on Cymbalta (duloxetine) may potentate the risk of liver damage.
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Marx
47 years experience in Pain Management
Flirting with Death?: This combination can be fatal if you're not lucky. These drugs are commonly found with inadvertant overdose deaths.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
48 years experience in Addiction Medicine
No and I suspect: that the fact you are asking this of a stranger online, rather than the doctor(s) who are prescribing these medications for you means that you KNOW th ... Read More
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jane Kang
Dr. Jane Kang answered
20 years experience in Psychiatry
Yes: Alcohol becomes abuse when it starts affecting your life negatively:if you having problems at work or showing up late or missing work; if it is making ... Read More
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Pacita David
29 years experience in Psychiatry
Not recommended: Psychoactive medications can cause significant central nervous system dysregulation when alcohol is consumed. Not only would you experience potential ... Read More
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1 thank
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robin Dretler
42 years experience in Infectious Disease
Alcohol poisoning: Caffeine causes one to stay more awake while drinking which raises the risk of drinking excessively. Usually intoxication makes one sleepy, but caffei ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gregg Albers
40 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Antidepressants: About 50%of drug and alcohol users also have a psychiatric problem, depression being the most common. Antidepressants will help reduce the symptoms o ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gerald Neuberg
37 years experience in Cardiology
Yes: Yes if there are no other issues. Just drink in moderation. One drink a day can be good for the heart. More can raise blood pressure in addition to ot ... Read More
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Pacita David
29 years experience in Psychiatry
Not recommended: Psychoactive medications, especially ones that tend to be sedating, such as Seroquel, (quetiapine) can cause significant central nervous system dysreg ... Read More
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Matthew Smith
39 years experience in Psychiatry
Many: None are absolute contraindications. The interactions that your doctor might be concerned about would be sedation orthostatic (standing up ) effects, ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Krishna Kumar
54 years experience in Psychiatry
Alcohol Abuse: I admire you for caring for your Health! Naltrexone is used to treat Alcoholism. Naltrexone will not cause to "sober up" It is not a cure for Alcoholi ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Alcohol: Alcohol can interact with medication and cause either additive effect (toxicity) or lowers potency of medication. The only safe medicine that comes to ... Read More
A 55-year-old male asked:
Dr. John Moranville
35 years experience in Psychiatry
Yes: trazodone is definitely a better alternative for sleep. Chronic use of benzos leads to tolerance and rebound insomnia. Just make sure you taper and do ... Read More
A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
39 years experience in Psychiatry
Not with depression: You should not be drinking alcohol if you have depression and especially not if you have blackouts. Gabapentin and alcohol are both central nervous sy ... Read More
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1 thank
A member asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience in Psychiatry
Not recommended: Of course no one can stop you from drinking whatever you want to -- but combining zoloft (sertraline) with alcohol is not recommended.
A member asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience in Psychiatry
Alcohol & Depression: Alcohol in any form -- including beer and tequila -- is a depressant. Combined with prozac, (fluoxetine) you could have much more sedation or intoxic ... Read More
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1 thank
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Singer
50 years experience in Pediatric Neurology
Individually safe: Individually each of these medications is safe in moderate doses. Mixing alcohol and either presents risk. Speak to your doctor about this.

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