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colonic diseases colorectal cancer

A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Joseph Accurso
28 years experience in Radiology
Very low: However, I am curious why you ask. I suspect it is because of rectal bleeding (mentioned in your conditions), which is a medical problem you need to ... Read More

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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience in Pathology
Location: Cancers that arise from the epithelium of the large intestine are similar in most ways whether they are in the colon or rectum. Discussions of "colon ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
38 years experience in General Surgery
Can be: Colon cancer and colon-rectal cancer are usually an adenocarcinoma, requiring surgery and sometimes chemotherapy. Colon cancer would occur somewhere i ... Read More
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Gulley
25 years experience in Hematology and Oncology
Sure: The most common kind of colon cancer is adenocarcinoma. There are however many more rate types of colon cancer. You can find out more about these at c ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience in Pathology
Heredity & diet: The cause is not known in most cases. In a small number the cause is clearly heredity, e.g., apc and hnpcc. In the garden variety colon cancer, a di ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Myron Arlen
63 years experience in Surgical Oncology
Genetic mutations: HNPCC or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is an autosomal dominant genetic condition that has a high risk of colon cancer The disease firs ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Gold
43 years experience in Internal Medicine
Sometimes: Some colon cancers are related to specific genetic mutations but the majority are not.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sidney Vinson
26 years experience in Gastroenterology
Yes: Having a first degree family member with colon or rectal cancer increases your likelihood of colon cancer too. This is even more pronounced if that p ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Myron Arlen
63 years experience in Surgical Oncology
Yes: Ulcerative pancolitis, is a chronic disease that inflames the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Specifically, ulcerative colitis causes lesions in the col ... Read More
A 61-year-old member asked:
Dr. Devon Webster
21 years experience in Medical Oncology
Yes: In some people there is a link. Genetic mutations can be passed through families that iincrease risk for both breast and colon cancer. These syndrom ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Crespin
27 years experience in Gastroenterology
Colitis cancer link: Ulcerative colitis can transform to colon cancer. Chronic inflammation can lead to dysplasia. Dysplasia can lead to colon cancer.
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Thompson
19 years experience in Hematology and Oncology
Yes: Yes. Many people are cured with colon cancer. If found early surgery alone may be curable. If more advanced (eg, lymph node involvement or metastatic ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
39 years experience in Geriatrics
Somehow yes: There is some genetic predisposition in families with hx. Of colorectal cancer. Diet also plays a rol ( low fiber diet increases cancer). Familiar po ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sanjay Jain
33 years experience in Internal Medicine
See below: Anus is about 3-4 cm long from skin to the rectum which is the last part of colon. Colon is lined by columnar lining and cancer of this is very common ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Albert Pizzo
59 years experience in Family Medicine
Colon cancer: Yes. For example finding colon polyps while they are still benign and removing them can prevent the polyp from turning to cancer. A healthy life sty ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Browning
29 years experience in Colon and Rectal Surgery
No, not needed: The good news is that you don't absolutely need your colon. For most colon cancers, the amount of colon that needs to be removed will not be missed.
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Addagada Rao
55 years experience in General Surgery
Both inherited: In fap presents as colonic polyps ( gardners syn will have other tumors ) , autosomal recessive due to mutations in gate keeper, tumor suppres gene. ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Dang
13 years experience in Radiology
See below: The colon is part of the gastrointestinal tract. The colon is also referred to as the large intestine. The small intestine is the bowels between the s ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
38 years experience in General Surgery
Yes: The large intestine and the colon are words to describe the same anatomic structure in the abdomen.
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eric Kaplan
41 years experience in Colon and Rectal Surgery
Possible: But less than 20% survive 5 years. Depends on where the metastases are and how numerous and size. Solitary liver mets without evidence elsewhere in th ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Cohen
28 years experience in Colon and Rectal Surgery
Gi cancers: Cancers that arise in the colon orrectum. Generally start as polyps.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Gold
43 years experience in Internal Medicine
Sometimes: Some colon cancers are related to inheritable genetic mutations but the majority are not.
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vijay Laxmi Misra
21 years experience in Internal Medicine
Colon cancer: Colonoscopy prevents colon cancer hence it is recommended as screening test at age 50 for people with average risk and age 40 if there is family histo ... Read More
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