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chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting

A 61-year-old male asked:
Dr. Shaym Puppala
25 years experience Internal Medicine
"non-inferior": Sancuso = granisetron in a transdermal patch. A study compared the granisetron patch with granisetron pills. Statistically speaking, there was "non- ... Read More
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A 23-year-old member asked:
Dr. Devon Webster
22 years experience Medical Oncology
It's a toxin: The brain has an area that triggers nausea and vomiting if something toxic gets in the body. This is what prevented early humans from dying after eat ... Read More
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Dr. John Geisler
27 years experience Gynecologic Oncology
Chemo nausea: Chemotherapy can cause nausea and vomiting in several ways. Most commonly it affects the central nervous system causing the nausea and vomiting. Some ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
33 years experience Anesthesiology
Helpful to healing: Too much nausea and vomiting may allow one to be dehydrated and undernourished and to feel just plain miserable. The last thing your body needs while ... Read More
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4 thanks
Dr. Liawaty Ho
23 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Quality of life: For 2 reasons-1.Maintain quality of life. Nausea/vomiting can be very debilitating. Chemo is given either to cure the cancer and/ or to maintain your ... Read More
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A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wesley Marquart
18 years experience General Surgery
Collateral damage: The simple answer is that chemotherapy targets rapidly dividing cells. That's why those agents are used to treat cancer. However, the cells lining th ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ball
19 years experience Pediatric Hematology and Oncology
Expectations : Nausea should be expected. Vomiting can occur. Though, you should have access to plenty of medications for nausea. Many people have flushing or an ... Read More
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Liesa Harte
29 years experience Family Medicine
Azithromycin: Azithromycin can be taken with or without food, so try taking it with food. If that doesn't help, you should notify the provider who prescribed you t ... Read More
A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
52 years experience Rheumatology
See details: You deal with it be first determining the cause. See a gastroenterologist for this issue.
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
25 years experience Psychiatry
No: Appendicitis can start with mild pain around the belly button. The pain worsens over time. It can become sharp with loss of appetite. Nausea, vomiting ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edwin Schuller
45 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: Yes.
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Charles Cattano
39 years experience Gastroenterology
Find cause of nausea: Nausea may be gi-related (food poisoning, peptic disease, gastroparesis, due to biliary ; pancreatic disease, gas/bloat syndrome, small bowel problems ... Read More
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