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chemo induced leukemia

A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Benjamin
23 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Treat or observe: Depends on the setting. I was taught in fellowship to treat neutropenia aggressively in a curative situation, and less aggressively in the palliative ... Read More
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Dr. Michael Engel
20 years experience Pediatric Hematology and Oncology
Following : Myelosuppressive chemotherapy, the bone marrow will be compromised in its ability to make neutrophils (a type of WBC that protects against bacterial i ... Read More
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1 thank

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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Thompson
20 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Chemo side effect: Many chemotherapies damage rapidly dividing cells. This includes cancer cells but can also include "gut" cells (=mucositis), hair, or the pre-cursor c ... Read More
Dr. Edward Gold
44 years experience Internal Medicine
Bone marrow suppress: Chemotherapy can suppress the function of the bone marrow, whichnisnwherenyou make your blood cells. This can result in the development of anemia. We ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Liawaty Ho
23 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Supportive care: It is treated mainly supportively-i.e. You need to keep yourself hydrated obviously. You can try gatorade, or pedialyte for hydration. What kind of c ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sanford Archer
38 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Topicals: Oral thrush is a fungal infection of the oral membranes, and usually occurs in people whose immune status are reduced. This can occur in people on an ... Read More
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2 thanks
A member asked:
Dr. Ritesh Rathore
30 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Not effective: Unfortunately chemo related neuopathy is not easy to treat. Standard options include trials of nurontin, Lyrica (pregabalin) or Cymbalta plus pain med ... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Liawaty Ho
23 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Peripheral neuropath: Most commonly presented as numbness/decreased sensation and tingling on your fingers and toes (stocking-glove pattern) . When it is worse it can then ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 62-year-old male asked:
Dr. Simon Grinshteyn
14 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: Yea they can. Most heme/onc docs have their own combination. The zofran (ondansetron) and dexa are often combined as is kytril and dexa. There may ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 59-year-old female asked:
Dr. Philip Miller
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Continue current Rx: which will help with all peripheral neuropathy. I do not recommend increasing or quitting current dosing, without consulting with your prescribing ph ... Read More
A 61-year-old male asked:
Dr. Shaym Puppala
25 years experience Internal Medicine
"non-inferior": Sancuso = granisetron in a transdermal patch. A study compared the granisetron patch with granisetron pills. Statistically speaking, there was "non- ... Read More
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1 thank
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bahman Daneshfar
33 years experience Radiation Oncology
Medication: Begin with basic nausea medicines such as Compazine or phenergan, (promethazine) if not improved then more expensive medications such as Zofran or oth ... Read More
3
3 thanks

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