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Aortic dissection

A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shane Parmer
22 years experience Vascular Surgery
Sure: Typically in the young if a dissection is considered it is related to trauma or a congenital connective tissue disease such as ehler's danlos or marfa ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Trent Proffitt
23 years experience Vascular Surgery
Yes: If associated with inheritable collagen diseases. However, it is usually related to elevated blood pressure.
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Milunski
36 years experience Cardiology
Aortic dissection: Probably the best studies are either a magnetic resonance angiogram (mra) or a computed tomography angiogram (cta) of the chest and abdomen.
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Venkata Chilakapati
22 years experience Cardiology
Aortic dissection: It depends upon extent of dissection and type of dissection.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Craig Carter
39 years experience Thoracic Surgery
No: An aortic dissection is a tear in the lining of the aorta, causing blood to leak into the aortic wall, causing pain and possibly hemodynamic issues. A ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. George T Tsai
26 years experience General Surgery
No: Aneurysm is the dilation of your artery that can rupture if it gets too big overtime. A dissection is when the layers of your artery separate - genera ... Read More
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vasudev Ananthram
31 years experience Cardiology
Minutes to hours: Develops over minutes and progresses over several hours and sometime days.
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ronen Elefant
12 years experience Critical Care
See detail: The Aorta (and all arteries) is composed of three distinct layers that are normally fused. A dissection refers to a separation of these layers, usuall ... Read More
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A member asked:
Dr. Karen Shackelford
25 years experience Emergency Medicine
Depends on size: You should have this monitored regularly and at a certain point your doctor will recommend surgery, if aneurysm continues to grow. Take his advice. I ... Read More
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A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Luke Hermann
24 years experience Emergency Medicine
Severe, abrupt pain: Pain that is abrupt in onset and severe in intensity is the most common symptom with aortic dissection (roughly 90% of cases). Because of the size and ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Fenster
30 years experience Cardiology
Depends: An aortic aneurysm can be the result of inherited conditions like marfan's syndrome. Conversley, aortic aneurysms may appear 'de novo' in those withou ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Timothy Wu
17 years experience Vascular Surgery
Pain: Aortic dissections in the acute stage (less than 3 weeks old) are classically described as a "tearing chest pain that radiates to the back" when they ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Harold Kim
27 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Pain: The overwhelming symptom is of pain, whether the back or chest. If is of a severe, sharp nature. Otherwise, symptoms related to reduced blood flow ca ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Amanda Xi
Dr. Amanda Xi answered
5 years experience General Practice
Serious condition: An aortic dissection is when a tear develops in the inner layer of the aorta [which is a large blood vessel that branches from the heart] and blood en ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Generally not: The 2 vertebral arteries arise from the left and right subclavian arteries and supply the brainstem and cerebellum. Dissection is rare (2.5/100, 000), ... Read More
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A female asked:
Dr. Philip Miller
46 years experience Family Medicine
Weakness: or bubble in either the distal sub renal aorta or actually on the renal artery, a branch of the abdominal aorta. It is important to document the size ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Joshua Moss
17 years experience Cardiac Electrophysiology
Go get evaluated: An aortic dissection does not typically just happen and go away. It is a life threatening event that more typically causes excruciating, tearing pain ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Ellichman
21 years experience Vascular Surgery
Can be: Dissections can be associated with hypertension, atherosclerotic disease and marans disease. All can be inheritable.
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mario Matos-Cruz
38 years experience Thoracic Surgery
No. : Dissections may become aneurysmal. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a full thickness dilatation of the aortic wall. In a dissection, there is a tear of ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
HCM: Not sure what you're asking. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in series with a bicuspid aortic valve has a potential for real trouble if the bi ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Be established: Become established with a cardiologist - i follow many people with your condition. When the time is right - usually at an older age, the valve can ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Scott
38 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
Narrowed heart valve: The aortic valve is between the left ventricle and the aorta. It ensures that blood flows from the heart to the body and not backwards. When the valve ... Read More
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A 52-year-old male asked:
Dr. Nestor Del rosario
33 years experience Addiction Medicine
See MD: It seems you have high risk factors of atherosclerois, heart attack. The most common cause of aortic aneurysm is athersclerosis (historic only, used t ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Severe chest pain: Aortic dissection is heralded by severe chest pain, often radiating from the front of the chest through the chest and into the back, often described a ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Joshua Buckler
18 years experience Cardiology
I : I am not exactly sure what your question is but would be happy to help if you could provide more information. You are likely referring to congenital a ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Indes
19 years experience Vascular Surgery
Chronic and acute: It is usually an acute event in a chronically hypertensive patient or a patient with a chronic disease of the aorta like Marfan's disease. There is no ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Laura Pak
Dr. Laura Pak answered
27 years experience Vascular Surgery
Depends: Aneurysms are dangerous because many people don't know they have them until they rupture. Screening is important for people over 65 with family histor ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mathew Chengot
42 years experience Cardiology
Surgery: Size and location matters in this regard check with your surgeon.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Louis Grenzer
54 years experience Cardiology
Blockage: The valve gets calcified and does not open fully eventually causing a drop in the output of the heart. The heart has to work harder to force the blood ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Lethal: If you think you have an aortic dissection, you should be in the er since the mortality rate until diagnosis rises by the hour.
A member asked:
Dr. Steven Gerndt
31 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Usually not: Typically, an abdominal aneurysm causes no symptoms until it ruptures or rapidly expands. In the event of rupture, the pain is sudden and severe. So ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sergio Schabelman
47 years experience Cardiology
Low BP: Before or after surgery for aortic dissection, the Blood Pressure has to be as low as possible and the first and most important medication given is a ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Banitt
31 years experience Cardiology
Possibly yes: There are some genetic conditions such as marfan's syndrome that can make patients more likely to develop an aneurysm of their aorta and an aortic dis ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Goldman
54 years experience Rheumatology
No: There are different types and different variation. Not all lead to dissection. You need to discuss this with your physician if this is you. Marfan ... Read More
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A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience General Surgery
Concern: Not fear! follow up with ct scans and echoes. Your family has an issue? Marfans aortoannular disease with dilation. You and your children should ... Read More
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Harinder Gill
38 years experience Cardiology
Ao dissection: Typically is of abrupt onset and not preceded by an aneurysm

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